Mission

The faculty of the Department of Social Sciences are engaged scholars and teachers who are dedicated to rigorous investigation and analysis of our social world and to developing critical thinking skills in our students that can be used to understand and address pressing social issues.  Through our research, we contribute to knowledge creation in our fields of study as well as the betterment of our communities.  Through our teaching, we educate students in the principles, theories, and methodologies informing the social sciences and encourage students to apply these skills in the communities in which they live.  The programs offered by the Department of Social Sciences emphasize research interpretation, application, and communication skills called for by many professions and graduate programs.

In this section...


 



 


Criminology

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 45.0401
Major Code CCJ
Department Code CJP
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/criminology/

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology provides students with the skills and knowledge needed in the wide variety of agencies that comprise the criminal justice system: these include law enforcement, detention, the judiciary, corrections, juvenile justice, probation and parole.  Also, the undergraduate program prepares criminology students to pursue a graduate degree in criminology or related disciplines.

Mission

The undergraduate program in Criminology introduces students to the theory, issues and methodology of the causes of crime and the criminal justice system. The program provides students with the critical thinking skills necessary for the consumption and production of criminological research. Upon graduation, students must be able to delineate the main theoretical explanations of crime and delinquency, demonstrate knowledge of research methods used in the fields of criminology and criminal justice, and provide an understanding of the structure and process of the U.S. system of criminal justice. Criminology students are required to take a capstone course where they produce a research paper to demonstrate their competencies in the above areas.  An Accelerated BA+MA Criminal Justice Program is available to students who meet specific requirements.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the B.A. degree in Criminology develops the ability to do the following:

  1. Summarize, apply and evaluate the structure of the U.S. system of criminal justice.
  2. Summarize and critique the theoretical explanations of crime and delinquency.
  3. Research Methods: Summarize, evaluate and critique research methods used in the fields of criminology and criminal justice.
  4. Critical Thinking: (a) Formulate vital questions and problems clearly; (b) Gather and assess relevant information; (c) Identify assumptions, alternatives and implications; (d) Develop well-reasoned conclusions and solutions.
  5. Communication: Communicate reasoning effectively; produce clear, concise, correct and convincing writing appropriate to the discipline.

Policies

Students majoring in Criminology must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS, as well as the following:

  • A minimum of 30 credit hours in the major coursework taken within the USF System

Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites or program prerequisites for the Criminology degree.

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in Criminology, although students may elect to take more.

Required Degree Core (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I 3 PR: C (2.0) or better in High
School Algebra or
Elementary Algebra CPT
score of 72 or better
6AMM, SMMA
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 None
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing
CCJ 3701 Research Methods in Criminal Justice I 3 PR:  CCJ 3117 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; Junior Standing
CCJ 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar (Variable Topics) 3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3701 6ACM, SMCC; Should be taken in the last semester at USFSM

Required Degree Electives*

The remaining seven (7) courses (21 credit hours) may be chosen from any upper-level Criminology courses.  Below is a sample listing of courses offered at USFSM, but this list is not conclusive.

*Students accepted in the Accelerated BA + MA Criminal Justice program may take up to 12 credits of graduate level electives to meet this undergraduate requirement.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3621 Patterns of Criminal Behavior 3 Junior Standing
CCJ 3336 Prisoner Reentry and Recidivism: When Inmates Come Home 3 None SMCD
CCJ 3644 White Collar Crime 3 None
CCJ 4604 Abnormal Behavior & Criminality 3 PR: CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
 CCJ 4910  Directed Research  1-3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
CCJ 4930 Critical Issues in Policing 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CJE 4114; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4933 Selected Topics in Criminology 3 PR:  CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI May be taken multiple times, as long as topics differ.
CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology 3 PR:  CCJ 3701 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; Senior Standing Cannot be used for core capstone credit.
 CCJ 4940  Internship For Criminal Justice Majors  3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; No more than 9 hours of CCJ 4940 will be accepted toward the elective hours required for the major; Senior Standing; S/U
CJC 4010 American Correctional System 3 PR: CCJ 3024  or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJC 4166  Alternatives to Incarceration  3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 PR: CCJ 3024  or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 4610 Criminal Investigation 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; CI
CJL 3110  Substantive Criminal Law  3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3502  Introduction to Courts  3 None
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
DSC 3013 Terrorism & Homeland Security 3 None
DSC 3594 Introduction to Intelligence Analysis 3 None

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the Criminology degree allow for electives outside the major.  Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies.  Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement a Criminology degree: Biology, Political Science, Psychology, History, Sociology or Spanish and Latin American Studies.

 


 


Criminology, BA+MA Accelerated Program

Qualified undergraduate criminology majors who want to pursue a master’s degree in Criminal Justice may apply to participate in an accelerated program. The BA+MA program allows undergraduates to take up to 12 graduate level credits that will count toward their BA in Criminology and a MA in Criminal Justice.

Qualifications for Admission to the BA+MA

  • 72 undergraduate credits that include 12 upper-level Criminology credits
  • Overall GPA of 3.33 or higher
  • Upper-level GPA of 3.5 or higher in the Criminology major
  • Endorsement of the BA+MA Admissions Committee

Qualifications for Progressing from the BA to the MA

  • Students must obtain a minimum grade of “B” (3.00) in each graduate course that will also count toward the undergraduate degree.
  • Upon satisfactory completion of all requirements for the undergraduate degree, students will be automatically admitted into the graduate program with up to 12 elective graduate elective credits already accomplished.
  • The BA+MA program is unique to USFSM; therefore, undergraduates in the program will be restricted to USFSM course sections and will require a permit to enroll for graduate credit.
  • Undergraduate students in the BA+MA program will pay the graduate per-credit rate for any graduate courses they take.

Application Process

  1. Students may apply to the accelerated BA+MA program after they have completed 12 upper-level credits of their BA degree requirements, but before they have fewer than 12 elective credits (4 courses) remaining.
  2. Before applying to the accelerated BA+MA program, students should confer with the criminology program coordinator, their academic advisor, and the financial aid officer if appropriate.
  3. If encouraged to apply, student should submit an electronic USFSM graduate application. And then proceed to submit the other required documents:
  • A sealed official undergraduate transcript(s);
  • Two letters of recommendation, addressing issues relating to past academic performance or work experience
  • A 1-2 page Statement of Purpose, indicating your reasons for seeking a master’s degree in Criminal Justice and the particular areas of criminology or criminal justice that interest you.

Send the required documents to:

USF Sarasota-Manatee
Office of Admissions
8350 N. Tamiami Trail, C107
Sarasota, FL 34243

Students will be charged graduate tuition for a full-time course load when taking graduate courses while working toward their BA.

 


 


Interdisciplinary Social Sciences

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 45.0101
Major Code ISS
Department Code IDS
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/interdisciplinary-social-sciences/

The B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS) is designed to provide an interdisciplinary integration of the social sciences for students who are interested in a holistic educational experience. ISS students design a program of study according to their interest by selecting a concentration in Applied Aging and Wellbeing; Crime, Law, and Justice; Environmental Studies; Governmental and Global Affairs; or Social Relations and Policy in addition to their core ISS coursework.  ISS students complete an internship course intended to provide work experience in their chosen concentration as well as an opportunity to apply the program’s emphasis on critical thinking and real-world problem solving.

Mission

The curriculum for the ISS degree at USFSM educates students in research methodology and statistics, critical observation, analysis of society, awareness of diversity, and the creative synthesis of disciplinary knowledge to address current social issues.  It encourages students to integrate diverse perspectives and develop the type of comprehensive understanding necessary to deal with the complexity of real-world problems.  In doing so, the ISS program aims to foster critical thinking skills that can be applied across countless job contexts, which are in demand by employers from a diverse range of occupations.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the principles, methods, and theories informing an interdisciplinary analysis of the social sciences.
  2. Demonstrate conversance with the important principles, methods, and theories of at least two social science disciplines.
  3. Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate research from at least two social science disciplines.
  4. Demonstrate appropriate techniques of analysis, qualitative, and/or quantitative, by synthesizing and evaluating published research and making recommendations for future research.
  5. Develop an effective written research paper.

Policies

Students majoring in ISS must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites for the ISS degree program.

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in ISS, although students may elect to take more.

  • Students must declare one (1) area of concentration when they declare the ISS major.
  • The ISS core courses are sequenced and must be spread over a minimum of four (4) terms; therefore students should begin taking core courses in the first semester of upper-level work.
  • While students are required to take a minimum of fifteen (15) credit hours in their concentration, they may elect to take more.
  • A minimum of 30 hours in the ISS major must be the 3000 or above level.
  • All transfer courses must be approved for use in ISS.  No transfer courses with grades below C are acceptable for credit in the ISS major.

Degree Core (15 credits, should be taken at USFSM)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISS 3311 Applied Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 PR: STA 2023 Should be taken in the first semester of the major
ISS 3010 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 None Should be taken in the first semester of the major
ISS 3300 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3 PR: ISS 3010 with a grade of “C” or better; CP: ISS 3311 with a grade of “C” or better
ISS 3937 Interdisciplinary Inquiry 3 PR: ISS 3300
ISS 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar in ISS 3 PR: ISS 3937 6ACM, SMCC

Theoretical Foundations Requirements (6 credits)

Take two (2) of the following courses:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 PR: LDR 2010 or 3331 with a minimum grade of C-. For USFSM students, LDR 3003 can serve as equivalent to LDR 2010. See Advisor.
POT 3003 Introduction to Political Theory 3 None
SYA 3110 Classical Theory 3 PR: SYG 2000; CI

Concentrations (15 credits)

Take five (5) courses from one concentration below.  A maximum of three (3) courses may be taken from a single department.

 

Environmental Studies (EVS) 

The concentration in Environmental Studies provides students with a greater understanding of environmental conditions as well as the policies that are both causes and effects of current environmental realities.

Course
Number
Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None SMCD
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
INR 3011 Globalization 3 None
INR 3038 International Wealth and Power 3 None SMLE
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 Junior Standing
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval

 

Government & Global Affairs (GGA)

The concentration in Government & Global Affairs explores the philosophical, institutional, administrative, and behavioral forces that shape global, national, state, and local governments and politics.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary
Era
3 None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 None
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 None
CPO 4034 Politics of the Developing Areas 3 None Topic:  Latin America
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 3703 International Economics 3 PR: ECO 2013, ECO 2023
INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 3 None
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
INR 4083 Conflict in the World 3 Junior or Senior Standing
INR 4403 International Law 3 None
INR 4931 Selected Topics 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 2041 American National Government 3 None SMSS
POS 2080 The American Political Tradition 3 None SMSS
POS 3182 Florida Politics and Government 3 None
POS 3078 Veterans’ Reintegration and Resilience 3 None SMCD
POS 3931 Selected Topics 3 None
POS 4624 Constitutional Law II 3 PR: POS 2041
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 None
POS 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions 3 None  SMSS
REL 3613 Modern Judaism 3 None
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI

 

Crime, Law, & Justice (CLJ)

The concentration in Crime, Law, & Justice encourages a global perspective in an analysis of the interrelationships among the social, political, and psychological factors that contribute to our understanding of criminal behavior, social justice, and the legal system.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary Era 3 None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 None
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 None
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3110 Substantive Criminal Law 3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3502 Introduction to Courts 3 None
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
EUH 3412 The Roman Republic 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
INR 4403 International Law 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
POS 4624 Constitutional Law II 3 PR: POS 2041
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 None
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 None
REL 4171 Contemporary Christian Ethics 3 Junior Standing or CI  SMLE
SOP 4751 Psychology Applied to Law 3 PR: PSY 3213
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Applied Aging & Wellbeing (AAW)

The Applied Aging & Wellbeing concentration is designed to provide students with a holistic understanding of issues related to health and wellbeing across the life course, with particular attention to our aging population.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ANT 4462 Health, Illness, and Culture 3 PR: ANT 2410; CI
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3 None SMSS
DEP 4053 Developmental Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
EDF 3802 The Dynamics of Unity 3 None SMLE
EXP 4304 Motivation 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
EXP 4680C Cognitive Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
GEY 3323 Community Resources for the Older Adult 3 None  SMCD
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4360 Counseling for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None
GEY 4641 Death and Dying 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
GEY 4692 Professional Development and Engagement in Aging 3 PR: GEY 3601, GEY 3625, GEY 4612 6ACM, SMCC
GEY 4900 Directed Readings in Aging 1-3 CI
GEY 4917 Directed Research in Aging 1-4 CI
GEY 4935 Special Topics in Gerontology 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 None
PSB 4004C Physiological Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
SOP 4777 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3024, STA 2122 and a General Biology course
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Social Relations & Policy (SRP)

The concentration in Social Relations & Policy provides an examination of the causes and consequences of human behavior, relations among groups, and social policy, with particular attention to issues related to human diversity.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 None
AMH 3572 African American History since 1865 3 None
ANT 4302 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 3 PR: an anthropology course or a women’s studies class
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
ECP 3203 Labor Economics 3 PR: ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with a grade of “C” or better SMLE
EDF 3802 The Dynamics of Unity 3 None SMLE
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 Junior Standing
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 3078 Veterans’ Reintegration and Resilience 3 None SMCD
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 PR: None
REL 4215 Ancient Israel and the Development of the Hebrew Bible 3 None
REL 4291 Women and the Bible 3 None
SOP 4004 Social Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
SOP 4777 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3024, STA 2122 and a General Biology course
SOW 3101 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 None
SOW 3102 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 PR: SOW 3101, SOW 4341, SOW 4522
SOW 3203 Introduction to Social Work 3 None
SOW 3210 The American Social Welfare System 3 None
SOW 4522 Multicultural America in a Global Society 3 None
SSE 4380 Global and Multicultural Perspectives in Education 3 PR: EDG 3604, EDG 4620 SMCD
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
SYD 3700 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 None
SYD 4410 Urban Sociology 3 None
SYD 4601 Community Building and Social Change 3 None SMCD
SYD 4800 Gender and Society 3 PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010
SYG 3235 Latina/Latino Lives 3 PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010 SMCD
SYO 3120 Sociology of Families 3 None
SYP 3060 Sociology of Sexualities 3 None
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the ISS degree allow for electives outside the major.  Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies by showing an area of expertise in addition to their ISS concentration. Students may elect to pursue any of the following minors that is not included in their ISS concentration:  Biology, Criminology, English Literature, Business and Technical Writing, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Leadership Studies, or Spanish and Latin American Studies.


 



 


Criminology

The minor in Criminology (CCJM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
The following two (2) required courses (6 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 None
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024
Any four additional courses with the following prefixes: CCJ, CJC, CJE, CJL, CJT at least 12

 


 


Economics

All students, regardless of college, can earn a minor in Economics (ECOM) by satisfactorily completing 15 credit hours in Economics: two principle courses and three upper-division courses of the student’s choosing.  It is possible to complete the minor entirely online; the principle courses will be offered both online and in a traditional face-to-face setting.

Required Courses (6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 None SMSS

Electives (9 credit hours)

Choose any three additional courses from the list below:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ECO xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
ECP xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
ECS xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
  • Students may select any 3000-level or above course with an ECO, ECP, or ECS heading for the minor, so long as the total number of upper-division hours is 9.

 


Environmental Science and Policy

The minor in Environmental Science and Policy (ESPM) consists of the following six (6) courses (18 credit hours).

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None  SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None  SMCD

 


Gerontology

The minor in Gerontology (GEYM) consists of a minimum of five (5) courses (15 credit hours).  The following three (3) required courses (9 credit hours) plus two additional GEY courses at the upper level (6 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None

 


Political Science

A minor in Political Science (POLM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
Any two (2) of the following courses (6 credit hours) plus any four (4) upper-level courses with the following prefixes: CPO, POS, POT, INR (at least 12 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 None
INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations 3 None
POS 2041 American National Government 3 None SMSS
POT 3003 Introduction to Political Theory 3 None

 


 


Sociology

A minor in Sociology (SOCM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
The following two (2) required courses (6 credit hours) plus any four (4) upper-level Sociology courses with the following prefixes: SYA, SYD, SYG, SYO, SYP (at least 12 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 None  SMSS
SYA 3110 Classical Theory 3 PR: SYG 2000; CI

 



 


Environmental Science and Policy

The Certificate in Environmental Science and Policy (ESP) is designed for individuals working in fields such as education, government, law, and urban planning who seek a greater understanding of environmental conditions as well as the policies that are both causes and effects of current environmental realities.

Policies

  • Students can pursue a certificate in Environmental Science and Policy while pursuing another degree or as a non-degree-seeking student.
  • Non-degree students must have a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • Students wishing to apply for the ESP Certificate should contact their academic advisor.
  • Students must earn a B (not B-) in each course taken for the certificate.

Program of Study

A certificate in Environmental Science and Policy consists of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None  SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None  SMCD
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