The announcements, information, policies, rules, regulations, and procedures set forth in this Catalog are for information only and are subject to continual review and change without notice.

USFSM is committed to the principles of equal education, equal access, and equal employment opportunities without regard to race, color, marital status, sex, religion, national origin, disability, age, or Vietnam or disabled veteran status as provided by law and in accordance with the University’s respect for personal dignity. These principles are applied in the conduct of University programs and activities and the provision of facilities and services.

In this section...


 


Undergraduate Admissions

Location: SMC C107
Telephone: 941-359-4331
Website: usfsm.edu/admissions/

USF System Regulation USF3.018 Admission to Baccalaureate Programs of University of South Florida System Institutions

USFSM Office of Admissions assists prospective students with learning about the opportunities available to them at the University. The office is responsible for processing applications for admission for new undergraduate students, former students returning, and reviews transfer credit completed at other regionally-accredited institutions for determination of transferability.

Admission to USFSM requires evidence of ability to handle academic work, capacity to think creatively, and strong motivation. The minimum admission requirements are designed to help identify applicants whose academic background indicates potential for success at USFSM; however, satisfaction of minimum admission requirements does not guarantee acceptance. The admission of new students at all levels is on a selective basis within curricular, space, and fiscal limitations. The selection process may include such factors as grades, test scores, pattern of courses completed, class rank, educational objectives, past conduct, school recommendations, personal recommendations, and portfolios. Preference for admission in any term will be given to those applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest promise of academic success. The University encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes and from all cultural, racial, religious, ethnic, and age groups.

Requests for waiver of the $30.00 application fee are considered by the Director of Admissions if payment of this fee creates severe financial hardship and serves as a deterrent to application.

Students are admitted to USF Sarasota-Manatee in accordance with the mission and goals of the University and within enrollment limitations established by the Department of Education and the Florida Legislature.


 


Admission Criteria

General Admissions Requirements

USFSM includes the minimum admissions requirements in the Undergraduate Catalog and the Florida Board of Governors’ website (6.002 Freshmen and 6.004 Transfer Students). Satisfaction of these requirements does not guarantee admission. USFSM gives preference to applicants whose credentials indicate the greatest promise of academic success and graduation. USFSM considers applicants for admission using the same criteria and minimum admission requirements in effect for the term of entry. No pre-admission consideration is given to an applicant with a disability (USF System Policy 0-108 Disability and Accommodations).

Applicants must submit a completed application for admission that is available on-line, a nonrefundable $30 application fee payable in U.S. dollars and, if English is not the applicant’s primary or native language, scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). USFSM waives the TOEFL or IELTS requirement if the applicant has an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree/certificate from a Florida public college/university with completion of English composition 1 and 2, or meets the Board of Governors’ minimum SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing score or ACT scores in Reading and Writing.

Performance in course work at any of the USF System Institutions attempted as a non-degree-seeking student does not qualify an applicant for admission to USFSM’s undergraduate degree program except if completed as part of the approved Pathways programs offered through INTO USF or other approved program.

Prior to registration, each student accepted for admission must submit a signed medical history form, including documentation of appropriate immunizations as required by USF Policy 33-002. New undergraduates, including both freshmen and transfers, must complete the appropriate Orientation/Advising/Registration program before the first day of classes of their term of entry.

Freshman Admission Requirements

Admission is competitive and based on a variety of factors, including the strength of high school curriculum, record of academic achievement and ACT or SAT scores. USFSM also values special talents and abilities in and out of the classroom.

Applicants must also meet the State University System of Florida (SUS) minimum number of academic units of high school credit.

See website: http://www.flbog.edu/forstudents/ati/ftcs.php

To receive priority fall admissions consideration and to be considered for merit-based scholarships from the Office of Admissions, students must submit an admissions application by January 2 and have a complete application with official supporting documents by January 15. For additional information about the awarding process and requirements, please visit the Admissions website.

General Transfer Requirements

The Florida Statutes and Florida Board of Governors’ Regulation 6.004 govern transfer admissions.

1. Transfer applicants must be in good standing, have a 2.00 grade-point average, and be eligible to re-enroll at the last regionally accredited institution attended as a degree-seeking student.

2. All transfer applicants must meet satisfactory academic progress criteria as determined by the U.S. Department of Education. USF System Institutions have specific transfer admission requirements which may include a completion of specific percentage of courses attempted. An excessive number of course withdrawals and/or failed and repeated courses could negatively affect admissibility as a transfer to USFSM.

3. Transfer applicants must submit official transcripts from all post-secondary colleges and schools where credit was attempted and/or earned.

4. USFSM Admissions computes grade-point averages based on grades earned in courses acceptable for transfer credit; incomplete grades compute as failures.

5. Transfer applicants must have completed two credits of one foreign language or American Sign Language in high school, or the equivalent of eight to ten semester hours in the undergraduate institution(s) attended or demonstrate equivalent foreign language competence as described in BOG Regulation 6.004. USFSM exempts transfers from this admissions requirement if they received an Associate in Arts degree prior to September 1, 1989, or if prior to August 1, 1989, they enrolled in program of study leading to an associate’s degree from a Florida public college or university and have maintained continuous enrollment until they are admitted to a university. A student establishes continuous enrollment by taking a course at least one term in each twelve-month period beginning with the student’s first enrollment in the Florida College System and continuing until the student enrolls in a SUS Institution.

Lower-level Transfer Requirements:

Fewer than 30 Transferable Semester Hours

USFSM accepts lower-level transfer applicants who have earned at least 12, but fewer than 60 semester hours of transferable college credit following graduation from high school.  Applicants with less than 12 transferable credit hours are considered as freshman in the application process and must meet FTIC admission criteria. Lower-level and mid-level transfer applicants must meet all requirements explained below under the Mid-Level Transfer Student and Upper-level Transfer Requirements section.

30 or More, but Fewer than 60 Transferable Semester Hours (Mid-Level Transfer Students)

Lower-level transfer students with 30 or more but less than 60 transferable semester hours (AKA Mid-level transfer students) who have successfully completed (C or higher) at least one transferable English composition course and one transferable college level mathematics course that consists of three (3) semester credit hours are not required to submit ACT/SAT scores. Mid-level transfer applicants are required to meet the state foreign language requirement (passing two years of the same foreign language) prior to admission to USFSM, and are required to submit an official high school transcript if the foreign language requirement was completed in high school. Mid-level transfer applicants who do not meet the above requirements must submit an official high school transcript showing a minimum 2.50 GPA on a 4.00 scale recalculated by USFSM.  In addition, they must submit official SAT or ACT scores and meet minimum criteria.  The minimum SAT scores are 500 in Evidence-based Reading and Writing and 500 in Mathematics.  The minimum SAT scores on the SAT taken prior to March 2016 is a 460 in Critical Reading and 460 in Mathematics.  The minimum ACT scores are 19 in Reading, 19 in Mathematics, and 18 in English.

Upper-level Transfer Requirements

USFSM grants admission to graduates of state approved Florida public college or universities who hold the A.A. degree/certificate. Florida Administrative Rule 6A-10.024 (Articulation Between and Among Universities, Community Colleges, and School Districts) governs the admission of A.A. degree/certificate degree transfers from Florida public colleges and universities. Undergraduate transfer students who have not earned the A.A. degree/certificate from a public community/junior college or state university in Florida or who have attended another college after receipt of the A.A. degree/certificate from a public community/junior college or state university in Florida must have an overall 2.00 grade-point average on a 4.00 scale in all college-level courses attempted and acceptable to transfer.

Associate in Arts degree holders who are not exempt from the foreign language requirement and all other upper-level transfer students admitted without meeting the foreign language admission requirement must satisfy the foreign language requirement prior to graduation.

Undergraduate transfer students who have not earned the A.A. degree from a Florida public institution or who have attended another college after receipt of the A.A. must minimally meet the requirements below to be considered for admission; however, satisfying these minimum requirements does not guarantee admission.

1. Be in good standing, have a 2.0 grade-point average, and eligible to return to the last regionally-accredited institution attended as a degree-seeking student or a non-regionally accredited institution participating in the State Course Numbering System (SCNS) with SCNS approved transferable credits;

2. Passed two years of the same foreign language in high school or 8 to 10 semester hours of the same foreign language at a previous college or university. Students who entered a Florida College System institution prior to August 1, 1989 and maintain continuous enrollment until the time of their USFSM entry as degree-seeking students may be admitted without the required foreign language study;

3. Meet the minimum grade-point average required by the program if entering a limited-access program and transferring 60 or more semester hours;

4. Applicants whose native language is not English must present a minimum score of  79 (Internet-based test) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or 6.5 on the  IELTS.

Upper-level transfer applicants for admission to a limited-access major must meet program requirements prior to admission to the University. Please refer to the requirements listed in the College sections of the catalog.

USFSM also considers applicants who do not fully meet the minimum requirements as stated in #1 and #2 above but who have important attributes, special talents, or unique circumstances that may contribute to a representative and diverse student body.  A  committee considers these undergraduate transfer applicants for admission on the basis of other demonstrated evidence of promise for academic success.  These applicants should also submit appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation, and responsibility that indicates potential for academic success at USFSM.


 


Admission Denial

Any applicant who does not meet minimum admission requirements and/or is denied admission to USFSM may submit an appeal in writing within 30 days of notification for reconsideration of the admissions decision for review by the Director of Admissions. The request must provide new reasons/evidence why this reconsideration is warranted based on extenuating circumstances and/or appropriate alternative evidence of academic achievement, ability, motivation, and responsibility that indicates potential for academic success. In addition to the admission criteria, other factors may be considered including, but not limited to, improvements in high school record, family education background, socioeconomic status, graduation from a lower performing high school, graduation from an International Baccalaureate program, geographic location, military service, special talents, and/or abilities, or other special circumstances. After a thorough review of the student’s profile by the appropriate committee, the committee may conclude that the applicant should be admitted if it is deemed that the student can be successful academically and graduate from USF System institutions. Student-initiated petitions that are denied by the Appeals Committee may be further appealed to the Dean who makes the final decision. Academic services and/or programs designed to enhance the success of any student admitted based on a profile exception must be outlined in the Committee’s recommendation for admission.

Undergraduate applicants—freshmen or transfers—who are denied admission as a degree-seeking student may not enroll as a non-degree-seeking student.

Applicants denied admission to USFSM who have a disability as defined by Board of Governors Regulation 6.018 and Section 1007.02, Florida Statutes may request a reasonable substitution of any requirement for admission in a letter of appeal of the decision as provided by the protocols of USFSM.  On appeal of a denial of admission, USFSM may provide reasonable substitution for any course or high school unit requirement for any person who has a documented disability.  The applicant may be required to provide documentation as detailed in Board of Governors Regulation 6.018 or Section 1007.264 Florida Statutes that the failure to meet the admission requirements is related to the disability, and USFSM may request other pertinent documents as needed to determine eligibility for substitution under this subsection.

USFSM may refuse admission to a student whose record shows previous misconduct that is deemed not to be in the best interest of the University community. The Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities or designee, will review all applications in which prior legal or behavioral conduct issues are noted. When necessary, this officer will contact appropriate parties having knowledge of the applicant and/or the misconduct and make a decision as to whether admission of the applicant would be in the best interest of USFSM. Any applicant denied admission under this Regulation may submit a written appeal to the designated office within ten (10) days after the notification of the denial of admission.

A non-degree-seeking student dismissed from USFSM for violations of academic integrity or the USF System’s Student Code of Conduct is not eligible for admission as a degree-seeking student to USFSM. If a student dismissed from USFSM subsequently earns a degree from a regionally accredited institution, the student may apply as a degree-seeking student to USFSM. If extenuating circumstances contributed to the dismissal and the student meets current admissions requirements, the student may submit a request for waiver of this rule to the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities or designee, for an academic violation, or for a violation of the Code of Conduct.


 


Admission International

International undergraduate applicants who are not permanent U.S. residents (BOG Regulation 6.009) must submit applications for admission, application fees, and all required supporting documents by the published deadlines. Applicants living outside of the United States are encouraged to submit required documentation no later than three (3) months prior to the date of desired entry to USFSM or the deadline for the degree program, whichever is earlier.

Supporting documentation includes the “Financial Support Requirements” form to show proof of availability of financial resources sufficient to cover all educational, maintenance, personal, and travel expenses while attending USFSM without financial assistance from the USF System; all transcripts identifying subjects and grades from the first year of secondary work to the time of application or graduation when applying as an entering freshman or a transfer with less than 60 hours of transferable postsecondary credit; appropriate diploma(s), certificate(s), degree(s), mark-sheet(s) and/or examination(s) passed, from the home country, as evidence of United States equivalent qualifications and academic preparation for the degree program requested; and “Transfer Clearance Form” signed by the International Student Advisor, if currently enrolled in a U.S. Institution. Each International applicant must submit a signed health history form, including proof of immunizations as required by USF Policy 33-002, and proof of adequate health insurance coverage as required by USF Regulation 6.0162.

All foreign, post-secondary transcripts must be evaluated and/or translated, if applicable, by one of the credential evaluation services identified on the USFSM website and published by the appropriate international admissions office. Documents signed by a notary or other public official with no educational affiliation will not be accepted.

Applicants whose native language is not English must demonstrate English proficiency by meeting the minimum test score requirements on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) as follows: 79 on the internet-based test (IBT) or a score of 6.5 on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). The TOEFL or IELTS requirement may be waived for an undergraduate applicant, if the applicant falls into one of the following categories: has submitted SAT or ACT test scores sufficient to validate English reading and writing proficiency as determined by the Board of Governors of the State University System of Florida, earned an Associate of Arts degree or higher from a domestic regionally accredited institution; has or will be graduating from a domestic high school; or English is the native language in country of origin, pursuant to approved list of countries posted on the USFSM website.


 


Admission Process

Admission is granted for an entry term and program as designated in the Official Acceptance Notice from USFSM. Students must enroll for the term to which they are admitted to validate their admission. Official notification is considered a hard-copy acceptance letter on official letterhead that is addressed to the student.

Deferment of Admission

Students who do not enroll for the admitted term may request a Deferment of Admission for a new entry term that starts within 12 months of the originally requested term. Applicants who request new entry dates must meet the admissions requirements and selection criteria in effect for the new term requested. Entry into selected degree programs may not be available for every term.

Provisional Admission

An applicant receiving a provisional admission as a degree-seeking student must submit any missing admission credentials, such as official transcripts or test scores required to substantiate eligibility for admission before the beginning of the second term of enrollment. Undergraduate applicants—freshmen and transfers—who do not meet the applicable institutional admissions requirements may be admitted through a profile assessment by a committee under authority delegated by the Florida Board of Governors when there is evidence that the student can be expected to be academically successful. This alternative review may be utilized for applicants who have important attributes, special talents, or unique circumstances that will contribute to a representative and diverse student population.

Students admitted to USFSM through a profile assessment because they do not meet the BOG admission requirements (BOG Regulation 6.002, (2)4.(b)) must be reviewed annually by the Director of Student Success, or designee, to ensure that their rates of retention, academic success and graduation remain near or above USFSM’s average. USFSM is responsible for required reports regarding students admitted under this section. The success of students admitted under the profile assessment process shall be reviewed by the Board of Trustees.


 


Admission to Limited-Access Degree Program

USFSM has established limited-access undergraduate degree programs of study, which are approved by the Florida Board of Governors and the State of Florida Articulation Coordinating Committee. USFSM offers limited-access degree programs in the College of Business, School of Education, and in partnership with the USF Tampa College of Nursing (http://health.usf.edu/nursing).

Upon admission to USFSM, transfer students, especially those from Florida’s public colleges and universities, shall have equal opportunity to enroll in limited-access baccalaureate programs.

In addition to the minimum requirements for admission, applicants seeking entrance to limited-access programs must meet additional requirements published and announced by each limited access program. The USFSM School of Education requires a 2.5 overall GPA and the USFSM College of Business requires a 2.75 overall GPA.

All applicants who seek direct admission must meet the criteria of the requested limited-access program including the overall GPA to be eligible for admission.


 


Application Process

The USFSM application for admission is available on-line and is required for the following:

  • First time in college applicant for admission to a baccalaureate degree program;
  • Transfer applicant pursuing a baccalaureate degree program;
  • Former USF System institution student who has not been enrolled in a USF System institution during the twelve (12) months or three consecutive terms prior to the new term of admission;
  • Student who has been academically dismissed from the institution;
  • Continuing or former USF System student applying for a second degree or another level of study, i.e. graduate degree program, if required by an institution within the USF System;
  • Graduate applicant; or
  • Non-degree seeking.

When to Apply

Applications for admission and non-refundable application fees for USFSM must be submitted by the published application deadline for the requested term of entry or the degree program, whichever is earlier. (see Academic Calendar) USFSM may begin admitting students as early as 12 months prior to the requested date of entry. If the application, fee, or application materials are received after the published application deadline, or after the enrollment limits or program limits are achieved for the requested term of entry, USFSM reserves the right to process the application for the next available semester.

Application Fee

A $30.00 non-refundable application fee must be included with the application.

Immunity Proof Requirement

Prior to registering for classes, all students born after 1956 are required to present documentation of proof of immunity to MEASLES (Rubeola) and RUBELLA (German Measles). It is further required that all students must present proof of immunity to Hepatitis B and Meningitis or decline immunization by signature. Students living in USFSM housing must be vaccinated against meningitis. The option to decline immunization is not permitted. (See Immunization Policy) Temporary medical exemptions must be submitted by the attending physician and include reason for exemption and duration of exemption.

  • For religious exemption applications, contact Student Health Services.
  • For off-campus term exemptions, contact Registrar.

Transcripts and Other Documents

Official transcripts, test scores, and other required credentials must be received directly from the issuing institution or agency. The applicant is responsible for requesting all required credentials and ensuring that they are received by USFSM Office of Admissions. All documents and credentials submitted are the property of USFSM. Originals or copies of the originals will not be returned to the applicant nor forwarded to any third parties.

USFSM reserves the right to request the testing agency to validate any applicant’s admission materials including transcripts and test scores such as SAT, ACT, TOEFL, or IELTS used in the admission process if, in the judgment of University officials, there is reason to warrant this validation.

An application for admission, residency affidavit, or supporting documentation submitted by or on behalf of a student containing false, fraudulent, or incomplete information may result in the denial of admission, or future semester registration and/or rescission of admission, credit, or degrees awarded by USFSM.

Change Term of Entry

Applicants may request admission for a different entry term that begins within 12 months of the original date of application without submitting a new application or paying another application fee. Any request for changes of the entry term or change to another institution in the USF System must be submitted in writing, and must provide the names of any college(s) attended and/or college work attempted that is not reflected on the original application. Also, official copies of transcripts must be received by the application deadline for the new term of entry or the degree program, whichever is earlier. If the new term of entry begins more than 12 months after the original application, a new application and fee must be submitted.


Articulation Agreement

Statewide Articulation Agreements Website
Articulation Between and Among Universities, Community Colleges, and School Districts

An articulation agreement, in effect since April 13, 1971 and later adopted by the Florida Legislature in statute form as Florida law, governs an effective and orderly transfer of Florida college students into the State University System (SUS).

The agreement defines and establishes the Associate in Arts degree from a Florida public college as the basis for all articulation rights. 


 


Dual Enrollment

Dual enrollment in USFSM classes is open to academically qualified students currently enrolled in a public high school in Sarasota County who are recommended by their principal or designee.  Dual enrollment students may take a limited number of courses at USFSM which are creditable toward their high school diploma.

Students wishing to enroll in the Dual Enrollment coursework at USFSM must:

  1. Have at least Junior standing at a Sarasota County public high school or approved entities at the start of the term in which they wish to enroll.
  2. Submit proof of a minimum of 560 on SAT Evidence-based Reading and Writing and a 530 on SAT Math, or a score of 21 on ACT Reading and 21 on ACT Mathematics, or a PERT score of 123 on Math, 106 on Reading and 103 on Writing.
  3. Have an unweighted, recalculated high school grade point average of 3.30 or better on a 4.00 scale and satisfied any course prerequisites. The GPA is recalculated from courses completed in English, Mathematics, Natural Science, Social Science, and Foreign Language.

Dual enrollment students who enroll in summer courses are required to pay for all costs for that term.

For additional information on dual enrollment and the application and approval process, contact the USFSM Office of Admissions and Financial Aid.


FUSE Program

Freshman applicants who are not offered admission or transfer students with less than 30 transferable credit hours can apply to join the USFSM FUSE Program at one of the Florida College System (FCS) partner schools. Students admitted to the FUSE Program will be placed on an academic graduation path that provides a seamless transition to USFSM. Students on a defined academic path will be advised on course pre-requisites, GPA requirements, tests, and any other additional criteria necessary for admission into limited access majors. FUSE students will also have access to specific USFSM and USF System events and activities. For more information, visit http://catalog.usfsm.edu/fuse/.


 


Readmissions of Returning Former Students

A degree-seeking undergraduate who has not enrolled at USFSM during the last 12 months must complete a new Application for Admission and pay the $30.00 non-refundable application fee to USFSM by the deadline for the term of requested re-entry.

Undergraduate students returning to seek a baccalaureate degree must be in good academic standing and eligible to return to the USFSM as well as the last institution attended as a degree-seeking student. For all college-level academic courses attempted at any institution since last enrolling at USFSM, the applicant’s transfer GPA must meet or exceed the GPA required of new transfer students at the time of readmission.

Former students who have attended one or more institutions since their last enrollment must request official transcripts of all work attempted at the other institution(s) be sent to the Office of Admissions. Acceptability of transfer credits toward completion of degree programs will be determined by the college of the student’s major.

The Academic Regulations Committees (ARC) have the Power to Approve (PTA) petitions for undergraduate or non-degree seeking students that fail to maintain a 2.00 GPA and are Academically Dismissed (AD) from USFSM. (Refer to the Academic Probation and Academic Dismissal Policies.) Academic Regulations Committees also may approve the readmission of students who qualify for Academic Renewal to have portions of their academic record not counted in the determination of the GPA for graduation purposes. (Refer to the Academic Renewal Policy.)


Summer Beginnings Program

USFSM’s Summer Beginnings Program is a transitional program, designed to offer a comprehensive and cohort-based summer experience prior to an incoming freshman’s first fall semester. Students in this program take college-level coursework during the summer term and engage with both student life and academic support initiatives designed to prepare them for success throughout their time at USFSM.

 

 


 


Transfer Credit Evaluation

The receipt and evaluation of transfer credits is the responsibility of the Office of Admissions, which will evaluate the acceptability of total transferable credits. The college of the student’s major will determine the transfer courses applicable toward the degree and assign equivalent courses to the transcript. In some cases, course equivalents may also be determined by specific colleges that offer the same or similar courses as part of their programs of study.

Transfer credits are accepted only from those institutions that are accredited by one of the six regional accrediting agencies at the time the credits were earned. Credits earned at an institution when it is/was in candidacy status will be considered for transfer credit once the awarding institution receives full regional accreditation. If an applicant is applying from a non-regionally accredited school, courses approved for transfer by the Articulation Coordination Committee may be considered for transfer credit. However, the admission decision will be based on the student’s prior work, if any, at a regionally accredited institution. Students may submit a request in writing to the Director of Admissions for courses from non-regionally accredited institutions to be accepted for transfer credit; submission of course syllabi and other information will be required.

  1. Courses that are remedial, occupational, or vocational in nature are not accepted as transfer credit to USFSM unless specifically determined by the University. In addition, USFSM reserves the right to evaluate courses or deny transfer credit, if not applicable to the degree program.
  2. Associate in Arts (AA) degree holders from a Florida public accredited institution will be awarded up to 60 semester hours of credit and recognized as having completed the USFSM’s General Education and University Success Requirements. For AA degree holders awarded by an out-of-state or private in-state institution, the USFSM Office of Admissions will conduct a course-by-course transfer credit evaluation.
  3. Articulated Associate in Science (AS) degree holders from a Florida public accredited institution will be awarded 60 semester hours of credit toward an approved USFSM BSAS program including credit for appropriate transferable General Education Courses they have completed per Florida’s Statewide Articulation Manual. For AS degree holders awarded by an out-of-state or private in-state institution, the USF System institution’s designated office will conduct a course-by-course transfer credit evaluation.
  4. All courses from a Florida public college or university with the same State Common Course prefix and last three numbers as a USF System course are automatically transferred and the transfer student will not be required to repeat these courses unless a college minimum grade or age-of-record policy is involved. Excluded are graduate courses, studio courses in art, internships, practica and performing arts courses in dance, acting, vocal and instrumental music.
  5. Credit is not awarded based on GED test scores.
  6. Military service school courses will be evaluated with reference to the recommendations of the American Council of Education (ACE) when official credentials have been presented. However, such recommendations are not binding upon USFSM.
  7. For ROTC and military science courses the maximum credit may vary with each college. A student must confer with his/her academic advisor to determine the credit for his/her major.
  8. USFSM awards credit-by-examination based on the minimum guidelines as established by the Articulating Coordinating Committee (ACC) available on the FACTS.org website, pursuant to Florida Statute 1007.27(2), and approved by the State Board of Education and Board of Governors. Per USF System Policy 10-017 (Credit by Examination), the USF System will accept a maximum of 45 credit hours earned through any combination of the examinations provided by the Advanced Placement (AP), Advanced International Certificate of Education Program (AICE), International Baccalaureate (IB), College Level Examination Program (CLEP), DANTES/DSST, Excelsior College, CAPE, General Certificate of Education (GCE), German Aibitur, and Global Assessment Certificate (GAC) exams.
  9. A maximum of 30 semester hours of extension, correspondence, and military service education credits may be counted for the purposes of meeting transfer admission criteria and applied toward a degree program.
  10. Grades earned in transferred courses are included in the student’s grade point average for the purposes of admission to limited access programs, awarding of honors at graduation, and class ranking of baccalaureate students but transfer grades are not included in computing the student’s grade point average.
  11. A degree-seeking student must obtain prior written approval from the college of the student’s major for courses taken at another regionally-accredited institution to be applied to the student’s degree program.
  12. Credit earned from an institution outside of the United States (which is not accredited by an acceptable domestic regional accrediting body) must be reviewed for equivalency on a U.S. scale by one of the credential evaluation services identified on the USFSM website and published by the appropriate international admissions office.

 


Undergraduate Degrees Offered

Majors

Program College Degree Type
Accounting COB B.A, B.S.
Applied Science, Cyber Security and Information Technology* COB B.S.A.S.
Applied Science, Leadership Studies* CLASS B.S.A.S.
Biology CSM B.S.
Communication Sciences & Disorders* CSM B.S.
Criminology CLASS B.A.
       Criminology, Accelerated BA+MA CLASS B.A.
Cyber Security and Information Technology* COB B.S.
Elementary Education CLASS B.A, B.S.
English CLASS B.A.
Finance COB B.S.
General Business Administration COB B.A, B.S.
General Studies CLASS B.A., B.S.
History CLASS B.A.
Hospitality Management CHTL B.S.
       Hospitality Management, Accelerated BS+MS CHTL B.S.
Interdisciplinary Education CLASS B.A.
Interdisciplinary Social Science* CLASS B.A.
Management COB B.A, B.S.
Management Science COB B.S.
Marketing COB B.A, B.S.
Pre-Engineering, Mechanical CSM A.A.
Pre-Nursing CSM A.A.
Professional and Technical Communication CLASS B.A.
Psychology CSM B.A.
Risk Management and Insurance COB B.S.

* Curriculum is 100% online.

Minors

Program College
Accounting COB
Applied Statistics CSM
Biology CSM
Business Analytics COB
Business Informatics COB
Business Operations and Quality Management COB
Criminology CLASS
Economics CLASS
Education CLASS
English CLASS
Environmental Science and Policy CLASS
Finance COB
General Business COB
Gerontology CLASS
History CLASS
Information Technology COB
International Business COB
Leadership Studies CLASS
Management COB
Marketing COB
Political Science CLASS
Professional and Technical Communication CLASS
Psychology CSM
Risk Management/Insurance COB
Sociology CLASS
Spanish and Latin American Studies CLASS

Certificates

Program College
Environmental Science and Policy* CLASS
Hospitality Management CHTL
Incredi-Bull Critical Thinking ALL
Information Technology* (various specializations) COB
Leadership Studies* CLASS
Professional and Technical Communication* CLASS

* Curriculum is 100% online.


 


Honors Program

The USFSM Honors Program offers students an extra challenge in their undergraduate study, instruction in the ways of scholarship, and the opportunity to pursue independent research.  Through the mentored experience of writing an undergraduate thesis and discussing it in an academic presentation, honors students have the opportunity to present original arguments with scholarly authority and integrity. Satisfactory completion of the Honors Program is noted on the diploma and the transcript, as well as on a certificate.

Undergraduate students in any major, who have a strong academic inclination, are invited to apply to the USFSM Honors Program. The Program may be completed as a Four-year Track or a Two-year Track, as described below.

Four-year Track

The Four-year Track is designed for students who enter USFSM with less than 30 credits. Students may apply for admission to the Honors Program as they apply to USFSM.

Students in the Four-year Honors Track will complete an Honors orientation program in their first semester at USFSM. Following the Honors orientation, students begin their Honors work in their second semester at USFSM by combining a one-credit Honors course (IDH 2930) with a selected course from the USFSM general education curriculum to create an Honors-enriched course. Four-year Honors students must complete at least 3 Honors-enriched courses during their first two years at USFSM to remain in the Honors Program. General education courses eligible for Honors-enrichment are listed below:

  • BSC 1005: Biological Principles for Non Majors
  • BSC 2010: Cellular Processes
  • BSC 2011: Biodiversity
  • CHM 2020/CHM 2045: Chemistry for Liberal Studies I
  • CHM 2045: General Chemistry I
  • CHM 2046: General Chemistry II
  • CHM 2414: Science of Cooking
  • ECO 2013: Economic Principles (Macroeconomics)
  • ECO 2023: Economic Principles (Microeconomics)
  • ENC 1101: Composition I
  • ENC 1102: Composition II
  • HUM 1020: Introduction to Humanities
  • MAC 2311: Calculus I
  • PHY 2053: General Physics I
  • PHY 2054: General Physics II
  • POS 2041: American National Government
  • PSY 2012: Introduction to Psychological Science
  • SPC 2608: Public Speaking
  • STA 2023: Introductory Statistics I
  • SYG 2000: Introduction to Sociology
  • THE 2000: Theater and Culture

Note that all courses may not be available each semester. Courses eligible for Honors enrichment will be designated as such in Oasis during the registration period. Students must work with their advisor and the Honors Coordinator to plan their Honors schedule.

After completion of the General Education curriculum, with at least 3 courses enriched by IDH 2930, Four-year Honors students may advance to the upper level Honors sequence (IDH 4000, IDH 4950, IDH 4970), which culminates in an undergraduate thesis.

Policies

  • Students who have earned a cumulative high school GPA of 3.7 or above and have a SAT math/verbal score of 1300 or ACT score of 27 or above are eligible for consideration for the Four-year Honors Track.
  • Students should apply to the USFSM Four-year Honors Track at the time they apply for admission to USFSM. The Four-year Honors Track application includes academic transcripts, a personal statement or essay written while a high school student, and an academic letter of recommendation.
  • Students must meet with their Academic Advisor and Honors Program Coordinator during the registration period to plan their Honors coursework.
  • Students may take 1 Honors-enriched course per semester.
  • Up to 3 credits earned through IDH 2930 may be applied towards General Education elective credit.
  • Upon completion of 2 credits of IDH 2930, Honors Program progression will be reviewed by the Honors Program Coordinator.
  • Students must earn at least 3 credits of IDH 2930 Honors coursework to be eligible to enroll in the upper-level Honors sequence.
  • IDH 4000, IDH 4950, and IDH 4970 must be taken consecutively.
  • To progress in the Honors Program, students must meet the performance expectations and deadlines specified in each course syllabus.
  • To remain in the Four-year Honors Track, students must achieve and maintain an overall USFSM GPA of 3.7 or higher.
  • Students must earn a B (not B-) in each IDH course to maintain good standing in the Honors Program.
  • Four-year Honors students who do not earn at least 3 credits of IDH 2930 coursework with a grade for each course of B or higher or do not maintain a minimum USFSM GPA of at least 3.7 may reapply to the Honors Program in their junior year.

Certificate Program of Study

Six (6) credit-bearing courses (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
IDH 2930 Selected Topics 1 PR: IDH 2010 or CI SMEL; Repeatable for credit with CI
IDH 2930 Selected Topics 1 PR: IDH 2010 or CI SMEL; Repeatable for credit with CI
IDH 2930 Selected Topics 1 PR: IDH 2010 or CI SMEL; Repeatable for credit with CI
IDH 4000 Honors Program Seminar: Major Works/Majors Issues 3 PR: IDH 2010 Spring semesters
IDH 4950 Honors Project 3 None Summer C semesters
IDH 4970 Honors Thesis 3 Senior Honors College Majors only Fall semesters

Two-year Track

The Two-year Honors Track is designed for students who transfer to USFSM with more than 30 credits or those who wish to enter the Honors Program in their junior year of study at USFSM. The Two-year Honors Track is limited to the 3-course upper-level sequence that culminates in an undergraduate thesis.

Policies

  • Applications are accepted every fall for cohorts that begin each spring.
  • IDH 4000, IDH 4950, and IDH 4970 must be taken consecutively, spring, summer (online), and fall.
  • Students must earn a B (not B-) in each IDH course to progress through the sequence.
  • To progress in the Honors Program, students must meet the performance expectations and deadlines specified in the syllabus.

Three (3) credit-bearing courses (9 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
IDH 4000 Honors Program Seminar: Major Works/Majors Issues 3 PR: IDH 2010 Spring semesters
IDH 4950 Honors Project 3 None Summer C semesters
IDH 4970 Honors Thesis 3 Senior Honors College Majors only Fall semesters

 


 


Incredi-Bull Critical Thinking Certificate

USFSM has identified critical thinking as a key educational imperative based on input from employers, faculty, and students. Therefore, critical thinking was selected for the 2015 – 2020 Strategic Plan and the 2016 – 2021 Quality Enhancement Plan. Courses that count toward the certificate are designed to help students develop their general and domain-specific critical thinking skills. Specifically, the courses emphasize:

  1. Formulating vital questions and problems clearly
  2. Gathering and assessing relevant information
  3. Identifying relevant assumptions, alternatives, and implications
  4. Developing well-reasoned conclusions and solutions
  5. Communicating reasoning effectively

The certificate requires a total of 12 credits of approved Incredi-Bull Critical Thinking (IBCT) courses. These courses carry the “IBCT-approved” designation in their course titles as indicated in OASIS. A list of approved courses is also available on the critical thinking program’s website (usfsm.edu/ibct) and from academic advisors.


 


Civics Literacy Requirement

State University System of Florida – Board of Governors 8.006 Civic Literacy

http://www.flbog.edu/documents_regulations/regulations/8.006%20Civic%20Literacy.pdf

The Civic Literacy requirement applies to undergraduate degree-seeking students initially entering a State University System (SUS) institution fall semester 2018 and thereafter.  Students must demonstrate competency in civic literacy through one of the following options prior to graduation:

(a) Successfully passing either POS X041 American Government or AMH X020 Introductory Survey Since 1877 in Fall 2018 or later. Each of the courses must include the following competencies:

  1. Understanding of the basic principles and practices of American democracy and how they are applied in our republican form of government;
  2. An understanding of the United States Constitution and its application;
  3. Knowledge of the founding documents and how they have shaped the nature and functions of our institutions of self-government; and
  4. An understanding of landmark Supreme Court cases, landmark legislation and landmark executive actions and their impact on law and society.

(b) Achieving the standard score on one of the following assessments:

  • U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Naturalization Test – Civics (U.S. History and Government) with supplemental questions (available beginning fall 2018) – Score 60
  • Advanced Placement Government and Politics: United States – Score 3
  • Advanced Placement United States History – Score 4
  • CLEP American Government – Score 50

TRANSFER STUDENTS:  This requirement applies to all transfer students who are initially entering an SUS institution as an undergraduate degree-seeking student starting in Fall 2018, including those who transfer with an AA degree. All undergraduate degree-seeking students who transfer in from any institution outside the SUS, including private or out-of-state institutions, who have not satisfied this requirement through an approved course or assessment, must complete this requirement prior to graduating.


 


Core Curriculum

With its Core Curriculum, the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee provides all of its students with the broad knowledge base and skills necessary to solve modern interdisciplinary problems in the vast array of careers open to college graduates. At the lower level, the University Core Curriculum consists of twelve courses (36 credits) as General Education (Gen Ed) and two courses (3 credits) as Foundations of Success (Foundations).  At the upper-level, students take at least three (3) Pillars of Intellectual Engagement courses (9 credits): one Communication and Critical Thinking course, one Leadership and Ethics course, and one Community Engagement and Diversity course.  In cases where General Education courses also meet degree requirements, the degree program may require a higher minimum grade.

The Core Learning Outcomes: “Pillars of Intellectual Engagement”

The Pillars of Intellectual Engagement arise from the mission of USFSM and reflect the characteristics most sought by employers.

  1. Communication: Students will communicate reasoning effectively.
  2. Critical Thinking: Students will (1) form vital questions and problems clearly, (2) gather and assess relevant information, (3) identify relevant assumptions, alternatives, and implications, and (4) develop well-reasoned conclusions.
  3. Leadership: Students will apply task-oriented and interpersonal skills to lead groups.
  4. Ethics: Students will develop a personal ethic, describe their beliefs and the origin of those beliefs.
  5. Diversity: Students will interact effectively in diverse cultural contexts by applying knowledge of own culture and multiple world views to evaluate social issues and develop an effective approach to multiculturalism.
  6. Community Engagement: Students will improve quality of life through engagement, personal growth, and impact on community.

Core Curriculum Chart

Lower Level

  • Students must achieve a grade of “C-” or better in each of their lower-level General Education courses.
  • Students must achieve an overall grade point average (GPA) of 2.00 in the lower-level requirements.
  • Transfer students should refer to “Transfer Credit Evaluation” in the Admissions section.
State-mandated General Education Requirements Credits 
Communication  (2 courses) 6
Mathematics  (2 courses) 6
Natural Sciences  (2 courses) 6
Social Sciences  (2 courses) 6
Humanities  (2 courses) 6
Electives from any of the above disciplines or from the approved elective list  (2 courses) 6

         Total

36
Foundations of Success Requirements  Credits
SLS 1107 – Foundations of University Success  1
SLS 2122 – Foundations of Professional Success  2

          Total

 3

Upper Level

  • Students must achieve a grade of “C-” or better in each of their upper-level required Pillar courses.

 

Pillars of Intellectual Engagement Requirements Credits 
Communication and Critical Thinking Pillar Course 3
Leadership and Ethics Pillar Course 3
Community Engagement and Diversity Pillar Course 3

Total

9

 

Graduation Requirements

All students graduating from USFSM must satisfy both lower-level requirements (General Education and Foundations) and the upper-level requirements (Pillars).

  • Students who transfer in to USFSM with a completed A.A. degree from a Florida public university or college have satisfied the lower level of USFSM’s General Education and Foundations of Success Requirements, but still must satisfy the upper-level Pillars requirements.
  • Students who transfer from a regionally accredited institution have their transcript audited to credit course equivalencies.
    • Students who enter the university with fewer than 30 credits or as first-time-in-college (FTIC) students are required to take both Foundations of Success courses.
    • Students who enter the university with 30 to 59 credits may take both courses, but are required to take only Foundations of Professional Success.  Students must complete at least 30 credits before enrolling in Foundations of Professional Success.
    • Students who enter the university with 60 credits or more may take either or both courses, but are not required to do so.
    • Students seeking second baccalaureate degrees (those coded as 5B) are exempt from these requirements.

 


Foundations of Success Curriculum

The two Foundations of Success courses (SMFS) emphasize all six Pillars of Intellectual Engagement through discussion and reflective writing as they develop the skills needed for academic and professional success.  Each Foundations of Success course includes projects that develop and assess all six outcomes of the Pillars of Intellectual Engagement.

Students take the Foundations of Success courses as part of their first 60 credits, along with the General Education curriculum.  Students take SLS 1107 Foundations of University Success (1 credit) during their first semester at USFSM.  Students must complete at least 30 credits before they can take SLS 2122, Foundations of Professional Success (2 credits).

  • Students who are first-time-in-college (FTIC) and transfer students with fewer than 30 credits are required to take both Foundations of Success courses.
  • Students who enter the university with 30-59 credits may take both courses, but are only required to take Foundations of Professional Success.
  • Students who enter the university with 60 credits or more may take either or both courses, but are not required to do so.
Course Number Title Credits Requisites (KEY)
SLS 1107 Foundations of University Success 1 None
SLS 2122 Foundations of Professional Success 2 PR: SLS 1107; Sophomore standing or higher

 


 


General Education Requirements

Communications (SMCO) (2 courses, 6 credits)

This requirement consists of a minimum of six (6) semester credits of approved course work in Communications, at least three (3) credits of which must come from the State-mandated General Education Course list (see below). USFSM students are required to take both English Composition I (ENC 1101) and English Composition II (ENC 1102).

Students awarded college credit in English Composition through dual enrollment, advanced placement or international baccalaureate shall be considered to have satisfied this requirement to the extent of the college credit awarded.

All USFSM Communications courses assess the following student learning outcomes:

  1. Communication: Students will communicate effectively by means of written and/or oral modalities.
    • USFSM Core “Communication” Learning Outcome
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Communications Learning Outcome #1
  2. Students will demonstrate the skills necessary to be proficient critical thinkers.
    • USFSM Core “Critical Thinking” Learning Outcome
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Communications Learning Outcome #2
Course Number Title Credits Requisites (KEY)
State-mandated General Education Communications Course 
ENC 1101 Composition I 3 Scores of: STI1 of 440 or TFL4 of 550 or TFIT of 079 or EAC1 of 17 or EAC3 of 18
Additional USFSM General Education Communications Course
ENC 1102 Composition II 3 PR: ENC 1101 (or the equivalent, i.e. passing the CLEP exam)

Mathematics (SMMA) (2 courses, 6 credits)

This requirement consists of a minimum of six (6) semester credits of approved course work in mathematics. At least three credits must come from the State-mandated General Education Mathematics Course list (see below).  At least one course must have either an MAC or an MGF prefix.  Students should consult with their advisor about the best course options for their degree and career aspirations.

Students awarded college credit in approved mathematics courses through dual enrollment, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate shall be considered to have satisfied this requirement to the extent of the college credit awarded.

All USFSM Mathematics courses assess the following student learning outcomes:

  1.  Students will demonstrate the skills necessary to be proficient critical thinkers.
    • USFSM Core “Critical Thinking” Learning Outcome
  2. Students will determine appropriate mathematical and computational models and methods in problem solving, and demonstrate an understanding of mathematical concepts.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Mathematics Learning Outcome #1
  3. Students will apply appropriate mathematical and computational models and methods in problem solving.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Mathematics Learning Outcome #2

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

State-mandated General Education Mathematics Courses*
MAC 1105 College Algebra 3 PR: C (2.00) or better in MAT 1033, or 490 or better SAT Math score, or 21 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better Elementary Algebra CPT score, or 40 or better College-Level Math CPT score.  No credit for students with prior credit for MAC 1140 or MAC 1147.
MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 PR: C (2.0) or better in MAC 1114 and C (2.0) or better in MAC 1140, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 650 or better SAT Math score, or 29 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better College-Level Math CPT score
MGF 1106 Finite Mathematics 3 PR: C (2.00) or better in MAT 1033, or 440 or better SAT Math score, or 19 or better ACT Math Score, or 72 or better Elementary Algebra CPT score.
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I 3 PR: C (2.00) or better in High School Algebra or Elementary Algebra CPT score of 72 or better.
Additional USFSM General Education Mathematics Courses
MAC 1147 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 4 PR: C (2.00) or better in MAC 1105, or 550 or better SAT Math score, or 24 or better ACT Math score, or 60 or better College-Level Math CPT score.
No credit for students with credit for either MAC 1140 or MAC 1114.
MAC 2233 Business Calculus 3 PR: C (2.00) or better in MAC 1105, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1140, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 590 or better SAT Math score, or 26 or better ACT Math score, or 78 or better College-Level Math CPT score.
MAC 2241 Life Sciences Calculus I 3 PR: C (2.00) or better in MAC 1114, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or 650 or better SAT Math score, or 29 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better College-Level Math CPT score.

  * Transfer credits will be accepted for the following state-mandated Mathematics courses not currently offered at USFSM: MGF X107. Any student who successfully completes a mathematics course for which one of the general education core course options in mathematics is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the mathematics core.

 

Natural Sciences (SMNS) (2 courses, 6 credits)

Courses in the natural sciences deal with the content, theories, history, presuppositions, and methods involved in study of natural phenomena.  They include demonstrations and address problems, ambiguities, and different perspectives in the natural sciences. They also provide students with an appreciation of how the discipline fits within the natural sciences and relates to their own lives as well as the broader human experience.  Students pursuing degrees or career aspirations involving science should opt to take courses with lab components.

This requirement consists of a minimum of six (6) semester credits of approved course work in the natural sciences. At least three credits must come from the State-mandated General Education Natural Sciences Course list (see below).  Students should consult with their advisor about the best course options for their degree and career aspirations.

Students awarded college credit in an approved natural science course through dual enrollment, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate shall be considered to have satisfied this requirement to the extent of the college credit awarded.  However, science majors and science minors may not exempt lower-level requirements of their programs through testing.

All USFSM Natural Science courses assess the following student learning outcomes:

  1.   Students will apply ethical perspectives and concepts to situations and justify the implications of their applications.
    • USFSM Core “Ethics” Learning Outcome
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically examine and evaluate scientific observation, hypothesis, or model construction, and the use of scientific method to explain the natural world.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Natural Sciences Learning Outcome #1
  3. Students will successfully recognize and comprehend fundamental concepts, principles, and processes about the natural world.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Natural Sciences Learning Outcome #2

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

State-mandated General Education Natural Sciences Courses*
AST 2002 Descriptive Astronomy 3 None
BSC 1005 Biological Principles for Non Majors 3 None
BSC 2010 Cellular Processes 3 CR: BSC 2010L
CHM 2020 Chemistry for Liberal Studies I 3 None
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I 3 550 SAT Quantitative score or completion of MAC 1105 College Algebra with a C or better AND one year of high school chemistry or completion of CHM 2023 with a grade of C or better.
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None
PHY 2020 Conceptual Physics 3 None
PHY 2048 General Physics I – Calculus Based 3 PR: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311; CR: PHY 2048L
PHY 2053 General Physics I 3 PR:  MAC 1140 and MAC 1114, or MAC 1147; CR: PHY 2053L; May not receive credit for both the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses.
Additional USFSM General Education Natural Sciences Courses
BSC 2011 Biodiversity 3 CR: BSC 2011L
CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 3 PR: CHS 2440 or CHM 2045 with a C or better or Chemistry with a minimum score of 4
CHM 2414C Science of Cooking 3 None
OCE 2001 Introduction to Oceanography 3 None
PHY 2054 General Physics II 3 PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L; CR: PHY 2054L; May not receive credit for both the PHY 2054 and PHY 2049 courses.

* Transfer credits will be accepted for the following state-mandated Natural Sciences course not currently offered at USFSM:  ESC X000. Any student who successfully completes a natural science course for which one of the general education core course options in natural science is an immediate prerequisite shall be considered to have completed the natural science core.

 

Social Sciences (SMSS) (2 courses, 6 credits)

Courses in the social sciences deal theoretically and empirically with individuals and their relationships to each other and to society. Courses introduce the content, theories, history, presuppositions, and methods of the discipline. They also address problems, ambiguities, and different perspectives in the discipline. These courses provide students with an appreciation of how the discipline fits within the social sciences and relates to their own lives and the broader human experience.

This requirement consists of a minimum of six (6) semester credits of approved course work in the social sciences.  At least three credits must come from the State-mandated General Education Social Sciences Course list (see below).  Students should consult with their academic advisors about the best course options for their degree and career aspirations.

Students awarded college credit in an approved social science course through dual enrollment, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate shall be considered to have satisfied this requirement to the extent of the college credit awarded.

 

All USFSM Social Science courses assess the following student learning outcomes:

  1.  Students will demonstrate and integrate an understanding of the complexity of elements important to various cultures, groups, beliefs, and/or practices.
    • USFSM Core “Diversity” Learning Outcome
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to examine behavioral, social, and/or cultural issues from a variety of points of view.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Social Sciences Learning Outcome #1
  3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of basic social and/or behavioral science concepts and principles used in the analysis of behavioral, social, and/or cultural issues – past and/or present, local and/or global.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Social Sciences Learning Outcome #2

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

State-mandated General Education Social Sciences Courses
AMH 2020 American History II 3  None
ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3  None
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3  None
POS 2041 American National Government 3  None
PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychological Science 3  None
SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3  None
Additional USFSM General Education Social Sciences Courses
AMH 2010 American History I 3  None
ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology 3  None
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3  None
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3  None
EUH 2012 Ancient History II 3  None
FIN 2100 Personal Finance 3  None
GEB 2011 Introduction to Business 3  None
GEY 2000 Introduction to Aging Sciences 3  None
INR 1015 World Perspective 3  None
POS 2080 The American Political Tradition 3  None
REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions 3  None

 

Humanities (SMHU) (2 courses, 6 credits)

Courses in the humanities deal theoretically and experimentally with the aesthetic dimensions of culture, contemporary and historical.  Approaching the interaction between artist and public through analysis, critique, and speculation, humanities courses explore the problems, ambiguities, and different perspectives in human creative response to lived experience.

This requirement consists of a minimum of six (6) semester credits of approved course work in the humanities.  At least three credits must come from the State-mandated General Education Humanities Course list (see below).  Students should consult with their advisors about the best course options for their degree and career aspirations.

Students awarded college credit in an approved humanities course through dual enrollment, advanced placement, or international baccalaureate shall be considered to have satisfied this requirement to the extent of the college credit awarded.

 

All USFSM Humanities courses assess the following student learning outcomes:

  1.  Students will communicate effectively by means of written and/or oral modalities.
    • USFSM Core “Communication” Outcome 
  2. Through demonstrating interpretive ability and cultural literacy, the student will confirm the ability to think critically.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Humanities Learning Outcome #1
  3. The student will acquire competence in reflecting critically upon the human condition.
    • Florida DOE Statewide General Education Humanities Learning Outcome #2

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

State-mandated General Education Humanities Courses
ARH 2000 Art and Culture 3 None
HUM 1020 Introduction to Humanities 3 None
LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature 3 None
MUL 2010 Music and Culture 3 None
PHI 2010 Introduction to Philosophy 3 None
THE 2000 Theater and Culture 3 None
Additional USFSM General Education Humanities Courses
FIL 1002 Introduction to Film Studies 3 None
LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry 3 None

Electives (SMEL) (2 courses, 6 credits)

To complete the required 12 courses (36 credits) in General Education coursework students select two additional lower-level courses (6 credits).  Any course listed in the five (5) categories above can be taken as an elective.  The courses below may also be counted as General Education electives. Students should consult with their academic advisor to select courses that may be helpful to their major.

Course Number Title Credits Requisites (KEY)
Electives
EDF 2005 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3 None
EDF 2085 Education, Diversity, and Global Society 3 None
EME 2040 Introduction to Technology for Educators 3 None
ENC 2210 Technical Writing 3 PR: (ENC 1101 and ENC 1102) or (ENC 1121 and ENC 1122)
IDH 2930 Selected Topics 0-3 PR: IDH 2010
LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization 3 None
MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics 3 None
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None

 


State Communication and Computation Requirement (formerly known as Gordon Rule)

Florida’s Communication and Computation requirement, formerly known as Gordon Rule, requires students to successfully complete 4 writing-intensive courses (12 credits) and 2 math-intensive courses (6 credits) prior to receipt of an associate in arts degree or entry into the upper division of a Florida public university or college.

Communication courses develop and assess competency in college-level writing skills through multiple assignments. At a minimum, students in Communication courses must write 4500 words that receive instructional feedback that relates to writing effectiveness. At least one assignment must include submission of a revision in response to previous feedback. In such cases both the original draft and the revised draft can count toward the 4500 word minimum. The Communications requirement is met by the following courses:

  • Two courses (6 credits) of English Composition, taken as part of General Education
  • Two courses (6 credits) of additional coursework that require college-level writing skills through multiple assignments. At USFSM General Education Humanities courses fulfill this part of the writing requirements.

Computation courses develop and assess competency in college-level mathematics skills. The Computation requirement is met by the following courses:

  • Two courses (6 credits) of approved General Education mathematics coursework.

State Communication and Computation Requirement Policies

  • Communication and Computation credit requires earning a course grade of at least C-.
  • Students must maintain a grade point average of at least 2.00 in courses meeting the State Communication and Computation requirement.
  • Students with certain types of disabilities may request test accommodations in State Communication and Computation courses.
  • The State Communication and Computation requirements are considered met for any student entering USFSM with an A.A. from a Florida public institution.
  • The State Communication requirement is considered met for any student entering USFSM with 60 or more semester hours.
  • Students shall receive Communication and Computation credit for specific courses upon entering USFSM in the following situations:
    • Students awarded college credit in English composition or mathematics at the level of College Algebra or higher, based on having taken a dual enrollment course, Advanced Placement, or International Baccalaureate.
    • Students who transfer in with Communication and Computation credit, awarded at another public Florida institution.

The State Communication and Computation requirement is codified by State Board of Education Rule 6A-10.030/BOG Articulation Resolution (Statewide Articulation Manual).

State Communication Courses (6ACM) (12 credits)

State Communication requirements are satisfied through the completion of General Education Requirements.  Lower-level General Education Communication Courses (ENC 1101 and ENC 1102) and all Lower-level General Education Humanities courses at USFSM are approved for the State Communication requirement.

The State Communication requirement should be fulfilled at the lower level; however, all Communication and Critical Thinking Pillars courses have been approved to meet this requirement for transfer students who have already taken a version of the qualifying lower-level courses and thus need another option to meet the State Communication requirement.

Please refer to the General Education Requirements and Upper-level Pillars pages for full course listings.

State Computation Courses (6AMM) (2 courses, 6 credits)

State Computation Requirements are satisfied through the completion of General Education Requirements.  Lower-level general education mathematics courses at USFSM are approved for the State Computation requirement.  Additionally, any mathematics course with an MAC prefix and number above 1105 qualifies as a State Computation course.

Please refer to the General Education Requirements page for full course listings.


 


Upper-Level Pillars

At USFSM, students continue to take upper-level courses that develop the Pillars of Intellectual Engagement: communication, critical thinking, leadership, ethics community engagement, and diversity.

Students take upper-level Pillars courses when they are classified as juniors, having earned at least 60 credits (exceptions may be made with dean’s approval). As juniors and seniors, students have been previously introduced to the Pillar values and competencies and are able to reflect upon them at a more sophisticated level.

In the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Business, and Hospitality & Tourism Leadership, students take three (3) Pillar courses to meet the university’s upper-level Pillars requirement.  These courses each have two Pillar values and competencies to a field of inquiry:

Communication and
Critical Thinking
This Pillar is addressed in each student’s degree capstone course.
Leadership and Ethics Depending on a student’s degree program offerings, this Pillar requirement may be met within the major or outside of it.
Community Engagement and Diversity Depending on a student’s degree program offerings, this Pillar requirement may be met within the major or outside of it.

In the School of Education, the Pillars are developed and assessed throughout the curriculum, so students do not take specific Pillar courses in addition to their major course of study.

Pillars courses are all numbered 3000-4999 and can count toward the required minimum of 48 upper-level credits for a bachelor’s degree.  Students are required to meet their upper-level Pillar course requirements with USFSM courses; therefore, no transfer credit can be used to satisfy the Pillars requirements.  All students must achieve a grade of “C-” or better in each of the upper-level Pillar courses.

Communication and Critical Thinking Pillar Courses (SMCC) (1 course)

Typically, the capstone course in a student’s major will count for this requirement. The degree capstones all require advanced competency in communication and critical thinking as students apply and synthesize the learning outcomes that shape their degree.  In Communication and Critical Thinking courses, a significant portion of the student’s grade is based on assignments that allow students to demonstrate mastery of the following Core Outcomes:

  1. Communication: Students will communicate effectively by means of written and/or oral modalities.
  2. Critical Thinking: Students will demonstrate the skills necessary to be proficient critical thinkers.

Upper-Level Communication and Critical Thinking Pillar Courses

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

BSC 4938 Biology Capstone 3 Biology Majors only
CCJ 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3701
CIS 4916 Cyber Security and IT Capstone Project 2 Senior Standing BSAS CyS&IT Majors only
CIS 4935 Senior Project in Information Technology 3-5 Senior Standing CyS&IT Majors only; DPR
EDG 4909 Directed Studies 1-4 Senior Standing
ENC 4268 Senior Seminar in Professional & Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 4946; Senior Standing
ENG 4934 Senior Literature Seminar 3 PR: ENG 3014; Senior Standing
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing
GEY 4692 Professional Development and Engagement in Aging 3 PR: GEY 3601, GEY 3625, GEY 4612; DPR
HFT 4295 Hospitality Leadership & Strategic Management 3 PR: HFT 3503 and HFT 4221
HIS 4936 Pro-Seminar in History 3 PR:  HIS 4104; History Majors only with 2.25 GPA or better
ISS 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar in ISS 3 PR: ISS 3937; Senior Standing
LDR 3263 Community Leadership Practicum 3 PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C-
PCB 4679 Biology Capstone Course: Evolution 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, and BSC 2011L; Senior Standing Biology Majors only
PSY 4938 Pro Seminar 3 PR: PSY 3213; Area 1 and Area II requirements complete; Senior Standing
SPA 4050 Introduction to the Clinical Process 3 PR: SPA 3004 and SPA 3310

Leadership and Ethics Pillar Courses (SMLE) (1 course)

Students will take one upper-level Pillars course designed to develop and evaluate advanced application of principles and methods of leadership and ethics through interdisciplinary examination of a topic.

In Leadership and Ethics Pillar courses, a significant portion of the student’s grade is based on assignments that allow students to demonstrate competency in the following Core Outcomes:

  1. Leadership: Students will analyze and apply specific leadership theories or characteristics.
  2. Ethics: Students will apply ethical perspectives and concepts to situations and justify the implications of their applications.

Upper-Level Leadership and Ethics Pillar Courses

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry Lab 2 PR: CHM 2210L CR: CHM 2211
CIS 4253 Ethics for Information Technology 3 Junior or Senior Standing
ECP 3203 Labor Economics 3 PR: ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with grade of “C”or better
EDF 3802 Dynamics of Unity 3 None
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership 3 None
INP 4004 Industrial Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or better
INR 3038 International Wealth and Power 3 None
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None
LIT 3621 Literature of Climate Change: Climate Fiction 3 None
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None
REL 4171 Contemporary Christian Ethics 3 Junior Standing
SPA 4510 Intro. to Clinical Methods and Counseling in CSD 3 PR: SPA 3004, SPA 3310
SPC 4701 Intercultural Communication 3 None

Community Engagement and Diversity Pillar Courses (SMCD) (1 course)

Students will take one upper-level Pillars course designed to develop and evaluate advanced application of principles and methods of community engagement and diversity through interdisciplinary examination of a topic.  This course will be experiential as student engage in course-relevant local and/or global community involvement.

In Community Engagement and Diversity Pillar courses, a significant portion of the student’s grade is based on assignments that allow students to demonstrate competency in the following Core Outcomes:

  1. Community Engagement: Students will demonstrate and integrate understanding of a societal issue as the result of engagement outside the classroom (literal or virtual).
  2. Diversity: Students will demonstrate and integrate an understanding of the complexity of elements important to various cultures, groups, beliefs, and/or practices.

Upper-Level Community Engagement and Diversity Pillar Courses

Course Number

Title

Credits

Requisites (KEY)

AML 3604 African American Literature 3 None
AML 3630 U.S. Latino/Latina Literature in English 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None
CCJ 3336 Prisoner Reentry and Recidivism: When Inmates Come Home 3 None
COM 3014 Communication, Gender, & Identity 3 None
COM 4022 Health Communication 3 None
EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 Junior or Senior Standing
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
HFT 3894 International Food & Culture 3 None
GEY 3323 Community Resources for the Older Adult 3 None
LIT 3031 Survey of Poetry 3 None
LIT 3043 Modern Drama 3 None
LIT 3093 Contemporary  Literature 3 None
MCB 4277 Insect-Borne Diseases and Global Health 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011
PCB 3346C Field Experience Research Abroad: Costa Rica 3 PR: BSC 3453 with a grade of C or higher
PCB 3404 Medicines of the Rainforest 3 PR: CHM 2211 with a grade of C or higher, BSC 2010 with a grade of C or higher
POS 3078 Veterans’ Reintegration and Resilience 3 None
SPA 4321 Introduction to Audiological Rehabilitation 3 PR: SPA 3310
SPC 3425 Group Communication 3 PR: SPC 2608 and COM 2000
SSE 4380 Global and Multicultural Perspectives in Education 3 PR: EDG 3604 and EDG 4620
SYD 4601 Community Building and Social Change 3 None
SYG 3235 Latina/Latino Lives 3 PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010

 


 


Orientation

Website: http://catalog.usfsm.edu/orientation/
USF System Policy 10-035: Mandatory Orientation for New Undergraduate Students

Freshman Orientation

What is New Student Orientation?

New Student Orientation is an annual program consisting of interactive, engaging presentations and activities intended to help acclimate all first-year students to their new campus community. The program is required for all incoming first-year undergraduate students as a means of transition and preparation for success in the USFSM community.

Why is New Student Orientation important?

Studies reveal that by increasing the amount of time first-year students have to become familiar with their respective institution, the greater the likelihood they will stay throughout their first year of college. Furthermore, students who actively participate in orientation programs along with other first-year transitional programs are more likely to stay in college, are more satisfied with their overall college experience, have greater academic success, and persist through graduation.

What are the BENEFITS of participating in the New Student Orientation?

Through the active participation of all first-year students, New Student Orientation:

  • affords opportunities for students to become familiar with the resources available to them at USFSM while establishing greater familiarity with campus building and grounds
  • develops a greater understanding in regards to the interconnected nature of the physical, social/emotional, and environmental aspects of one’s self, others, and campus community
  • provides students with useful insights regarding academic, social, and personal challenges
  • clarifies expectations related to college life
  • creates a strong foundation from which every student is able to launch their collegiate career, ensuring persistence through graduation
  • forms friendships that will last a lifetime

Transfer Orientation

All new transfer students are required to participate in orientation while former students returning to USFSM are encouraged to participate. Orientation at USFSM provides an introduction to USFSM and the USF System and facilitates the smooth transition of students into the academic and social environments of the university. In addition, overviews and requirements for college degree programs, general USF System policies and services, and student activities and campus life are reviewed. Academic advising and registration for classes are part of the orientation process.  Transfer students should bring an unofficial or student copy of their transcript(s) at the time of orientation.


 


College of Business

Location SMC-C212
Telephone 941-359-4455
Website usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-business/
Advising Student Services
SMC-C107
941-359-4330

The College of Business is accredited by The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business – AACSB International for Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, and Marketing majors.

The undergraduate curriculum is composed of several segments: (1) broad general education in the arts, humanities and sciences; (2) the common body of knowledge for management responsibilities; and (3) majors specializing in Accounting, Finance, General Business, Information Technology, Marketing and Management.  Through flexibility in its requirements, the College is able to satisfy the different interests and career objectives of students with diverse backgrounds.

Vision

To be recognized as an outstanding school of business and information technology education in the Sarasota-Manatee region.

Mission

To (a) provide high quality education in business and information technology with an emphasis on critical thinking in a personalized learning environment, and (b) engage in innovative research and other scholarly activities to advance the knowledge of business and information technology.

Values

  • Academic excellence
  • Student-centeredness
  • Freedom of inquiry
  • Community engagement
  • Diversity and inclusion
  • Global perspective

Learning Goals and Objectives

BA/BS Core

Learning goal #1: Our graduates are informed and effective decision-makers.

Objectives:  Our students will …

  • … integrate fundamental (core) business concepts in functional areas.
  • … demonstrate critical thinking skills to solve problems.
  • … apply diverse business perspectives to a competitive environment.

Learning goal #2: Our graduates are successful team players.

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … interact successfully with diverse people.

Learning goal #3: Our graduates are responsible global citizens.

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … make ethical decisions that are respectful of diverse stakeholders and the environment.
  • … demonstrate personal professionalism.

Learning goal #4: Our graduates are effective communicators. 

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … create and deliver effective oral presentations.
  • … produce professionally written documents.

MBA Core

Learning goal #1: Our graduates are ethical leaders of organizations.

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … successfully influence and motivate others.
  • … interact and communicate effectively with diverse people.
  • … make ethical decisions.

Learning goal #2: Our graduates are global, strategic thinkers.

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … demonstrate critical thinking skills to solve business problems.
  • … strategically analyze and plan in a competitive environment (locally and globally).
  • … consider international issues in strategic decisions.

Learning goal #3: Our graduates are innovative.

Objectives: Our students will …

  • … apply integrated knowledge of functional business areas to make effective decisions.
  • … develop creative and feasible solutions to business problems.

 



 


Admission Requirements

The College of Business is an upper-level, limited access college, with the exception of Information Technology and Risk Management majors (see below).  This means that Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science and Marketing majors have admission requirements in addition to those of USFSM.

  1. Minimum of 60 semester hours of college credit earned.
  2. Minimum of 2.75 overall GPA on all college-level work and a minimum of 2.00 on all credit attempted at USF, including any prior to academic renewal.
  3. In computing entry grade point average all business and economics courses taken for S or U grades will be converted to C or F, respectively.
  4. Students who have been dismissed from the University for academic reasons will not be readmitted to the following majors: Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science and Marketing.

Transfer credits will be accepted from regionally-accredited institutions; however, all hours earned may not be applied toward USFSM business degree requirements. Individual courses will be evaluated by an academic advisor and appropriately credited toward requirements in the student’s program at USFSM. Florida public institution students enrolled in an Associate in Arts (A.A.) program should normally complete the general education requirements and the State-Mandated Common Prerequisites at the lower-level.

As a rule, students transferring with an A.A. degree should avoid taking any business courses at the Florida College System institution that are listed as 3000 and 4000 level courses at USFSM.

Normally, courses in finance, marketing, management, and accounting, as well as other business administration and economics courses, taken at the lower division level that are offered as upper division courses at USFSM will not be accepted for upper division credit in business administration or economics.

In general, business courses taken at the lower level, at technical schools, or as part of professional or military training, are not applicable to the degree programs of the College of Business. Exceptions to this policy will be made only upon proper validation of such courses. Validation consists of successfully completing specified advanced courses in the discipline.

B.S. Program Admission Requirements

Admission to the Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security and Information Technology and the Bachelor of Science in Risk Management is open to all students, lower and upper division, who have been accepted into USFSM and declare the major. Students who have credits from other institutions may need to provide copies of course descriptions from the catalog for purposes of determining credit towards the major requirements at USFSM.

B.S.A.S. Program Requirements

Students majoring in B.S.A.S. must meet all degree requirements of USFSM. This degree program is available ONLY to A.S. graduates from Florida public institutions who have an overall “C” average (2.00) in all college-level courses accepted for transfer credit to USFSM.


 


Graduation Requirements

Unless otherwise stipulated below, students in College of Business majors must meet all graduation requirements of USFSM.

 

Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science and Marketing Graduation Requirements

  1. Students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 120 semester hours. Of the minimum 120, at least 60 hours must be business courses (except Aging Services Management and Business Technical Writing Concentrations), and a minimum of 54 hours must be non-business courses (i.e., all courses not normally offered in the College of Business). Additional electives may be required to reach a minimum of 120 hours and can be either business or non-business.
  2. Students must earn a grade of C or higher and a minimum grade point average of 2.00 in all major and minor fields and College foundation courses.
  3. Students must be admitted to the College of Business at least one term before their anticipated graduation date.
  4. For a Bachelor of Arts degree, the COB does not accept American Sign Language for the Foreign Language Exit Requirement. 
  5. For a Bachelor of Science degree, students can use two semesters of American Sign Language or two years (of the same foreign language) of successful completion of High School foreign language.
  6. College of Business residency requirements for graduation exceed the minimum requirements established for USF System Institutions. Students are required to complete satisfactorily at USFSM a minimum of 50 percent (30 semester hours depending on major) of required courses, including 12-18 semester hours in the major field (except Aging Services Management and Business Technical Writing Concentrations). Normally, independent study, research, and reading courses do not fulfill this requirement.  The directed study, research,  and reading courses require a professor’s permission and the dean’s approval.
  7. All business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.
  8. All courses in the major or minor field and all foundation coursework in business must be taken on a graded basis; the S/U option is not available.

Information Assurance Graduation Requirements

  1. All transfer work will be reviewed by the advising office and the Dean.
  2. Students must earn at least a 2.00 overall GPA, USFSM GPA, and in the major to be certified for graduation.
  3. At least 50% of the major coursework must be completed at USFSM.

In addition, for B.S. Information Assurance and Cybersecurity Management majors, a grade of “D” will not be counted toward fulfilling the major requirements. Grades of “D” or “F” in the IT courses will be used in calculating the major GPA unless the course is retaken under the grade forgiveness policy. Course equivalencies need approval from the College Dean.  Only grades of “C-“ and above in IT courses can be used to fulfill graduation requirements.


 



 


Accounting

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 52.0301
Major Code ACC
Department Code ACC
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/accounting/

The objective of the baccalaureate degree program in accountancy is to provide students with accounting and business knowledge that will serve as a basis for careers in industry, government, non-profit organizations and public accountancy.

The baccalaureate program also prepares students for entry into a Masters professional degree program.

The State of Florida, like most states, requires 150 credit hours of education in order to apply for CPA licensure. Questions concerning the CPA examination should be directed to the Florida Board of Accountancy.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the Accounting Major develops the ability to do the following:

  • The ability to understand and apply generally accepted accounting principles to the measurement and reporting of income and financial position for business enterprises.
  • The ability to understand and apply the basic concepts of gross income, taxable income, allowable deductions, tax credits, and asset basis as they relate to individual income taxation embodied in the United States income tax system.
  • An understanding of the principles and operation of well-controlled information systems in a variety of technological environments with added emphasis on the collection, processing, and reporting of accounting information.
  • The ability to develop information and processes to enable managers to estimate the costs of products and services the firm provides, to make routine and strategic resource allocation decisions, and to evaluate the performance of individuals and organizations.
  • An understanding of the independent financial statement auditing function and the professional responsibilities of external auditors and their public accounting firms.
  • Critical thinking and analytical abilities, including the ability to analyze cases, identifying and addressing the relevant issues with critical analysis.
  • The ability to communicate effectively, including the ability to prepare a well-structured recommendation in writing with supported conclusions and recommendations.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 and ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122,  or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses (6 credits)

Students must complete SPC 2608 (3 credits) and must take one of the following three (3) credit courses: COM 3110 or ENC 3250.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
and
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
or
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100.
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 Junior Standing
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program.

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements (24 credit hours)

Accounting majors must meet all the entry requirements to the College of Business as listed in the General Requirements section. In addition, students must earn a grade point average of  2.75 or higher in ACG 2021 and ACG 2071. Before taking any other Accounting coursework, all Accounting majors must earn a “C” or higher in ACG 3103. It is strongly recommended for students to successfully complete ACG 3103 within two attempts. After two attempts if this requirement has not been met, students should meet with an Accounting faculty member or academic advisor immediately to discuss their major. Within the 120-semester-hour program, students must complete a minimum of 24 hours of upper level accounting with a grade of “C” or higher in all courses. Students must complete 18 hours of the upper level accounting requirement in residency at USFSM. Finally, students must earn a 2.00 GPA on all major course work at USFSM and have an overall 2.00 major GPA including any applicable transfer work.

The student’s program must also include coursework taken in behavioral sciences and humanities, such as psychology, anthropology, and sociology, and the political environment of business and society, such as political science, public administration, and ethics. College of Business advisors will recommend courses that will satisfy the program requirements.

Accounting majors can use the grade forgiveness policy only once in upper-level accounting courses. Accounting courses taken by accounting majors on an S/U basis will not be counted toward the 120-hour graduation requirement. Independent Research, ACG 4911, will not be accepted as credit toward the minimum degree requirements in the accounting major.

Required Courses (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ACG 3103 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 PR: ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-); CP: ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-). ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3103.
ACG 3113 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 PR: ACG 3103 and ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I 3 PR: ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-); CP: ACG 3103 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-). ACG 3103 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3341.
ACG 3401 Accounting Information Systems 3 PR: ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-); CP: ACG 3103 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-). ACG 3103 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3401.
ACG 4632 Auditing I 3 PR: ACG 3113, ACG 3401 with a grade of “C” or better
TAX 4001 Concepts of Federal Income Taxation 3 PR: ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-); CP: ACG 3103 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-). ACG 3103 can be taken concurrently with TAX 4001.

Elective Courses (6 credit hours)

The students must select six (6) credit hours

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ACG 3006 Professional Topics in Accounting 2-3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of C or better
ACG 4123 Intermediate Financial Accounting III 3 PR: ACG 3113 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ACG 4351 Cost Accounting and Control II 3 PR: ACG 3103, ACG 3341 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ACG 4501* Governmental/Not-for-Profit Accounting 3 PR: ACG 3113 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-) *Students may take ACG 4501 or ACG 5505, not both.
or
ACG 5505* Governmental/Not-for-Profit Accounting 3 PR: ACG 3113; CR: ACG 4632 *Students may take ACG 4501 or ACG 5505, not both.
ACG 4642 Auditing II 3 PR: ACG 4632 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ACG 4931 Selected Topics in Accounting 3 None
ACG 5205 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 PR: ACG 3113
ACG 5375 Valuation of Closely Held Businesses 3 PR: ACG 2021
ACG 5675 Internal and Operational Auditing 3 PR: ACG 3113, ACG 3401; CR: ACG 4632
BUL 5332 Law and the Accountant 3 PR: BUL 3320 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
TAX 4011** Federal Tax Accounting II 3 PR: TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-) **Students may take TAX 4011 or TAX 5015, not both.
or
TAX 5015** Federal Taxation of Business Entities 3 PR: TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-) **Students may take TAX 4011 or TAX 5015, not both.

 


Applied Science, Cyber Security & Information Technology

Degree Type: B.S.A.S.
CIP Code 24.0101
Major Code APS
Department Code DEA
Concentration Code CYY
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/information-technology/

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (B.S.A.S.) was developed under provisions from Florida legislation to recognize Associate in Science (A.S.) degree holders to pursue and acquire a bachelor’s degree. At USFSM, concentrations for B.S.A.S. are available in the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences and the College of Business.  In the College of Business, the B.S.A.S. degree can be pursued in Cyber Security and Information Technology.

Mission

The mission of the B.S.A.S. program is to further develop the occupational competencies of an A.S. degree to the level of a Bachelor of Science degree.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the significant facts, principles, concepts, and/or theories comprising their selected field of concentration.
  • In work appropriate to the following areas of concentration, students will be able to demonstrate the following functions of critical thinking: focus on the main idea, draw inferences, evaluate, analyze, and continue the progression of an idea.
  • In work appropriate to the following areas of concentration, students will be able to demonstrate the following functions of good writing: focused unity, coherent organization, relevant support, appropriate diction and syntax, correct grammar and mechanics for the discipline.

Policies

Students majoring in B.S.A.S. must meet all degree requirements of USFSM. The following policies also apply:

  • This degree program is available ONLY to A.S. graduates from Florida public institutions who have an overall “C” average (2.00) in all college-level courses accepted for transfer credit to USFSM.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program.

Degree Requirements

Credits transferred in from completed A.S. degree

Requirements

Credit Hours

General education 18
Lower-level credits from A.S. degree 42

Credits to be completed at USFSM

Requirements

Credit Hours

Notes

General education 18
Major 23-30
Upper-level elective credits to meet degree requirements Variable
Upper-level pillar requirements Variable See Core Curriculum for upper-level pillar course options.
Sequential foreign language courses if foreign language requirement is not fulfilled 8-10

Admission Requirements:

To pursue a B.S.A.S. degree in Cyber Security and Information Technology at USFSM, students must have a Florida A.S. degree, with an overall GPA of 2.00 or better in an IT-related discipline.   This program supplements the related technical skills obtained in the A.S. degree. Students are encouraged to take the following highly recommended courses.

Highly Recommended Courses (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COP 2030 Programming Concepts I 3 None
COP 2250 Object-Oriented Programming (Java SE) 3 None
COP 2700 Database Systems Basics 3 PR: COP 2030
MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics 3 None

Major Requirements:

The B.S.A.S. in Cyber Security and Information Technology is made up of eleven (11) credits of required core courses and twelve (12) credits of electives.

Required Core Courses (11 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CEN 3722 Human Computer Interfaces for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 3515
CGS 3373C Data Networking & Communication 3
CGS 3374C Architecture & Operating Systems 3 PR: CGS 3373
CIS 4916 Cyber Security and IT Capstone Project 2 Senior standing in IT  SMCC, 6ACM

IT Elective Courses (12 credit hours)

A large selection of IT electives are available within the college.  Students should work with their advisor to tailor their B.S.A.S. degree to meet their personal interests and career goals.


 


Finance

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 52.0801
Major Code FIN
Department Code FIN
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/finance/

The Finance major provides a broad based, analytical program for students anticipating a career in the financial management of both large and small organizations. Finance provides a good background for students seeking general careers in business. Finance majors can elect to take courses in the following areas that prepare them for entry and advanced careers in

  • financial management of corporations
  • management of financial institutions
  • investments
  • financial services, insurance, and real estate.

In addition, the program in Finance is designed to provide the skills required by students earning degrees in other business disciplines and by students who seek professional degrees in areas such as law and public administration.

The Finance program offers applied and theoretical courses that enable the graduate to identify and solve problems in the acquisition and allocation of funds by organizations in the public and private sectors in domestic and international settings. It provides the background necessary for managing wealth in a risky environment. Finance relies on an interdisciplinary approach that draws on economic theory, accounting, information systems, and the quantitative decision frameworks of statistics and mathematics.

The major is designed to ensure that graduates are familiar with the tools of financial decision making and that they possess the skills to stay abreast of the developments in the field. Finance graduates will understand the functions and operations of financial markets, become familiar with computer applications in finance, and know how to access and utilize financial information. Course content is designed to provide majors with an appreciation of cooperative work skills and to enhance their verbal and written communication skills.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the Finance Major develops the ability to do the following:

  • The evaluation of investments by identifying key economic and political issues to determine appropriate investment strategies.
  • In-depth knowledge of financial management; the underlying principles of corporate finance and the analytical techniques involved in financial planning and decision-making.
  • A comprehensive understanding of the various functions and operations of financial institutions and markets.
  • Critical thinking and analytical abilities, including the capability to engage in inductive, deductive, and quantitative reasoning and to construct sound arguments.
  • The ability to communicate effectively, both on an individual basis and in collaboration with others.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 & ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 Junior Standing
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program.

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours of upper-level finance courses beyond FIN 3403. At least twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all major coursework at USFSM. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all finance courses that are counted toward the major requirements.

Courses taken as part of the major, minor, or concentration, cannot be used on other majors, minors or concentrations within the College of Business.

Required Courses (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
FIN 4414 Advanced Corporation Finance 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
FIN 4504 Principles of Investments 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
Additional upper-level approved Finance electives 9 Finance electives can be selected from among those 3000 and 4000 level classes that have FIN, REE, and RMI prefixes, as well as MAR 3400 and TAX 4001. At least one elective must have an FIN prefix.

 


 


General Business Administration

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 52.0101
Major Code GBA
Department Code DEA
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/general-business-administration/

The General Business Administration (GBA) major prepares students for positions in an interdisciplinary business world that values cross-functional abilities.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the GBA major develops the ability to do the following:

  • Explain the key factors in the domestic and global economic, political-legal, socio-cultural, and technological environment of business and be able to systematically analyze the multiple environments in which organizations operate and seek to gain competitive advantage.
  • Understand the ethical and legal responsibilities of organizations as they pursue economic goals and objectives.
  • Effective management and planning with a customer and market focus.
  • Understand key financial, economic, and accounting concepts.
  • Explain how financial, statistical, and other quantitative data can be used to analyze strategic and operating performance and serve as the basis for management decisions.
  • Communicate effectively, both orally and in writing.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 & ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses (6 credit hours)

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 Junior Standing SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 Junior Standing
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Concentrations (18-24 credit hours)

Students must complete a minimum of eighteen (18) hours of upper-level coursework. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all general business courses within the major requirements. There are three concentration options for students in the general business major: Applied Business, Aging Services Management, or Business and Technical Writing.

Applied Business Concentration (GAB) (18 credit hours)

  • Courses taken as part of the Applied Business concentration cannot be used in other majors, minors, or concentrations within the College of Business.
  • Courses taken as part of another College of Business major may not be used to satisfy Applied Business concentration courses.
  • At least twelve (12) credit hours of the required business courses must be taken in residence at USFSM.

 Required Courses

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY)  Notes (KEY)
FIN 4414 Advanced Corporation Finance 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 PR: QMB 2100 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 or ACG 2071 with a grade of “C-” or better
MAN 4600 International Management 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better; CI; Senior Standing
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 PR: MAR 3023
Choose any two upper-level ACG, QMB, ISM, FIN, MAN, MAR courses 6 Students may only take courses in which they have met the prerequisites.

Business and Technical Writing Concentration (GTW) (24 credit hours)

  • The Business and Technical Writing courses are offered through the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (CLASS).
  • Students will take twelve (12) credit hours from the concentration and twelve (12) credit hours of upper level ACG, QMB, ISM, FIN, MAN, MAR courses for a total of 24 credit hours.
  • At least nine (9) credit hours of the required business courses must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Approved Electives (12 credit hours)

Students should choose four (4) courses from the following:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 PR: ENC 1101 and 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMLE
ENC 3246 Communication for Engineers 3 None
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 PR: Any one of the following: ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260, ENC 2210
ENC 4311 Advanced Composition 3 PR: ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4906  Professional & Technical Writing Independent 3 PR: At least two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing Internship 3 PR: ENC 3242 with a minimum grade of C; Student must have an approved application and approved formal internship agreement; This course may not be repeated for credit; Majors only

Aging Services Management Concentration (GAM) (24 credit hours)

  • The Aging Services Management courses are offered through the College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences (CLASS).
  • Students will take fifteen (15) credit hours from the concentration and nine (9) hours of upper level ACG, QMB, ISM, FIN, MAN, MAR courses for a total of 24 credit hours.
  • At least nine (9) credit hours of the required business courses must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None

Approved Electives (6 credit hours)

Students should choose two of the following electives.

*With permission from the CLASS dean, up to two courses may be taken from USF Tampa (those marked with asterisks)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None
GEY 3323 Community Resources for the Older Adult 3 None  SMCD
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4360 Counseling for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4608 Alzheimer’s Disease Management 3 PR: GEY 2000 or GEY 3326; CI
GEY 4641 Death and Dying 3 None
GEY 4507* Understanding Policies and Practices of Long Term Care 3 PR: GEY 2000
GEY 4508* Health Care Operations 3 PR: GEY 4507, ACG 2021, each with a grade of “C” or
better
GEY 4509* Regulatory and Clinical Operations 3 PR: GEY 4508, ACG 2021, each with a grade of “C” or
better
GEY 4900 Directed Readings in Aging 1-3 CI
GEY 4917 Directed Research in Aging 1-4 CI

 


 


Cyber Security & Information Technology

Degree Type: BS
CIP Code 11.0103
Major Code CYB
Department Code EIT
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/information-technology/

Mission

The Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security and Information Technology is a broad program of study encompassing key aspects of cyber security and information technology. Information technology, as an academic discipline, focuses on meeting the needs of users within organizational and societal contexts through the selection, creation, application, integration and administration of these technologies. The program is designed to provide a solid foundation in cyber security and information technology. Additionally, the goal is to utilize the resources of the program to provide service to society; and to emphasize the need for lifelong learning and ethical conduct in practice. An additional educational goal of this program includes understanding the diverse social and business context in which information technology is practiced.

Specifically the program aspires to:

  1. Lead to the advancement of Cyber Security and Information Technology through nationally-recognized education at the undergraduate level
  2. Enable knowledge and technology transfer to regional industries and businesses.
  3. Prepare students for full and ethical participation in a diverse society and encourage lifelong learning.
  4. Educate undergraduates in the best practices of the field as well as integrate the latest research and practices into the curriculum.
  5. Emphasize development of problem solving and communication skills as an integral component of the educational process and the subsequent practice of the discipline.
  6. Provide quality learning experiences through highly interactive techniques of course delivery that include the use of electronic support equipment and distance learning technologies.

The Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security and Information Technology program provides a comprehensive curriculum in (1) information technology providing a solid foundation in data communications and networking, programming, software modeling, operating systems, system administration, database design, systems integration and project management and (2) cyber security providing high-demand skills and knowledge needed to protect network infrastructures, secure electronic assets, prevent attacks, investigate cyber crimes, perform in-depth incident analysis and build  and manage secure infrastructures. With a Bachelor of Science in Cyber Security and Information Technology, students will be ready to partner with professionals in business, industry, government, and education to design and build cutting-edge solutions to meet the needs of companies worldwide. The coursework is designed to impart skills and experience to enable students to compete nationally and globally. Through a carefully constructed core and a broad-base set of electives, students will be able to tailor the program to satisfy their individual preferences and strengths.

Students completing the Cyber Security and Information Technology program qualify for a broad range of positions in computer-intensive businesses and industries such as: programmer analyst, systems analyst, systems designer, data specialist/analyst, database administrator, network administrator, computer resource manager, systems development manager, information technology manager, security system administrator, security analyst and IT security consultant to name a few.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The program enables students to attain, by the time of graduation:

  1. An ability to analyze a problem, and to identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  2. An ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based solution to meet a given set of computing requirements in the context of Cyber Security and Information Technology
  3. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences about technical information
  4. An ability to make informed judgments in computing practice based on legal and ethical principles.
  5. An ability to function effectively on teams to establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, manage risk, and produce deliverables.
  6. An ability to identify and analyze user needs and to take them into account in the selection, integration, evaluation, and administration of computer-based systems.
  7. An ability to apply security principles and practices to the environment, hardware, software, and human aspects of a system.
  8. An ability to analyze and evaluate systems with respect to maintaining operations in the presence of risks and threats.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

State Prerequisite Course USFSM Course Offering
 Course Number Credit Hours
PSY XXXX Any Psychology Course PSY 2012 3
STA X023 Statistics or STA X122 STA 2023 3
CGS XXXX Any Database Course COP 2700 3
COP 2XXX Programming Concepts Course COP 2030 3
COP 2XXX Any Object-Oriented Computer Programming Course COP 2250 3
MAD XXXX Discrete Mathematics Course MAD 2104 3
MAC XXXX Pre-Calculus Course MAC 1147 4
PHY XXXX Any Physics Course PHY 2053 4
ECO X013 Macroeconomics ECO 2013 3

Program of Study

Students must take 13 required core courses (39 credit hours), one required communication course (3 credit hours), and four elective courses (12 credit hours).

Required Core Courses (39 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CGS 3373C Data Networking & Communications 3 None  
CNT 4403 Network Security & Firewalls 3 PR: CNT 4104 OS included in course
CGS 3374C Architecture & Operating Systems 3 PR: CGS 3373C with a grade of “C-” or better  
CIS 4203 Cyber Forensics & Investigations 3 PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104  
COP 3375C Data Structures and Algorithms in Python 3 PR: COP 2030 with a grade of “C-” or better
CEN 3722 Human Computer Interfaces for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 3515
COP 3515 Program Design for Information Technology 3 PR:  COP 2512 or equivalent; CI
COP 3718 Database Systems Design 3 PR: COP 2700
CIS 4935 Senior Project in Information Technology 3 Senior Standing CyS&IT Majors only; DPR 6ACM, SMCC
CIS 4253 Ethics for Information Technology 3 Junior or Senior Standing; Basic Computer skills SMLE; Students may use PHI 3636 or LDR 4204 for the requirement
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 None
CIS 4510 IT Project Management 3 CI
CAP 4790 Data & Security Analytics 3 None

Required Communication Course (3 credit hours)

The following courses are suggested communication courses.  Check with your academic advisor for other courses that may be accepted for this requirement.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENC 3246 Communication for Engineers 3 None  
OR        
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122  
OR        
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310; CI  

 

Required Electives  (12 credit hours)

Student must choose four (4) courses (12 credit hours) from the elective list below.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CGS 3853 Web Systems for IT 3 PR: CEN 3722
CIS 3362 Cryptography and Information Security 3 PR: MAD 2104; CI
CIS 3615 Secure Software Development 3 PR: COP 3515 with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4204 Ethical Hacking 3 PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104
CIS 4216 Aggressive Hacking: What Hackers Do 3 PR: CGS 3373C, CGS 3374C, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4342 NoSQL Databases 3 PR: COP 2250
CIS 4361 Information Assurance and Security Management for IT 3 PR: COP 3515; Junior or Senior Standing
CIS 4365 Computer Security Policies and Disaster Preparedness 3 PR: CIS 3360
CIS 4368 Database Security and Audits 3 PR: COP 3718
CIS 4369 Web Application Security 3 PR: COP 3718 and CGS 3853 both with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4387 Mobile and Wireless Security 3 PR: CGS 3373C, CGS 3374C, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
COP 3259 Advanced Programming in JAVA 3 PR: COP 2250
COP 4663 Mobile Applications Development 3 PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375C
COP 4834 Data-Driven Web Sites 3 Completion of prerequisites for admission to CyS&IT program; Junior or Senior Standing; CI

 


 


Management

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 52.0201
Major Code MAN
Department Code MAN
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/management/

The undergraduate degree in Management prepares students for entry-level positions in business and management, as well as human resources/organizational development positions and small business management. It also prepares students for graduate study in Business such as the M.B.A. program.

Management is a dynamic field that focuses on planning, organizing, and leading in business, non-profit and governmental organizations. Managing people in organizations involves behavioral concepts such as motivation, personality, teamwork, communication and leadership skills. Management is responsible for the triple bottom-line: financial, social, and environmental performance. With a focus on people in organizations, managers develop the human capital of organizations. Motivating and developing an organization’s workforce today requires attention to relationships with people inside and outside the organization, locally and across the world. The curriculum in management covers all aspects of management including: human resources development, organizational behavior theory, leadership, organizational development, negotiation, social issues in management, and strategic planning. Students leave this program knowing how to apply the latest ideas and concepts in management to organizational issues. Analytical skills, communication skills and leadership skills are developed in both classroom and assignment activities throughout the curriculum.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  1. Explain the major theories of motivation.
  2. Explain key theories of leadership and power.
  3. Understand the implications of effective Human Resource Management.
  4. Understand what U.S. firms should do to ensure successful business operations in selected foreign countries.
  5. Assess management problem/issue, generate alternative solutions, and make recommendations.
  6. Communicate effectively in oral and in written form.

Management majors are strongly recommended to take ENC 4264 Managerial Communications early in their major studies.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 and ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None  SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 None
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements (18 credit hours)

Students must complete eighteen (18) hours of management and organization beyond MAN 3025. At least twelve (12) hours must be taken in residence at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all major coursework at USFSM. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all Management courses that are counted toward the major requirements.

Required Courses (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 3301 Human Resource Management 3 None
MAN 4600 International Management 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better; CI; Senior Standing
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023; CI

Elective Courses (6 credit hours)

Choose two (2) of the following courses.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
GEB 3016 Business Enterprise Management 3 None
ISM 3232 Business Application Development 3 CP: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 PR: QMB 2100 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 or ACG 2071 with a grade of “C-” or better
MAN 4930 Managing Diversity (Selected Topic) 3 None
MAN 4430 Seminar in Negotiations and Administration of Labor Agreements 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4804 Small Business Management Counseling 3 PR: MAN 4802; CI
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 PR: MAR 3023

 


Management Science

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 52.1301
Major Code Please refer to online catalog
Department Code MAN

 

The undergraduate degree in Management prepares students for entry-level positions in business and management, as well as human resources/organizational development positions and small business management. It also prepares students for graduate study in business, such as the M.B.A. program.

Management is a dynamic field that focuses on planning, organizing, and leading in business, non-profit and governmental organizations. Managing people in organizations involves behavioral concepts such as motivation, personality, teamwork, communication and leadership skills. Management is responsible for the triple bottom-line: financial, social, and environmental performance. With a focus on people in organizations, managers develop the human capital of organizations. Motivating and developing an organization’s workforce today requires attention to relationships with people inside and outside the organization, locally and across the world. The curriculum in management covers all aspects of management including: human resources development, organizational behavior theory, leadership, organizational development, negotiation, social issues in management, and strategic planning. Students leave this program knowing how to apply the latest ideas and concepts in management to organizational issues. Analytical skills, communication skills and leadership skills are developed in both classroom and assignment activities throughout the curriculum.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Students will be able to:

  1. Explain the major theories of motivation.
  2. Explain key theories of leadership and power.
  3. Understand the implications of effective Human Resource Management.
  4. Understand what U.S. firms should do to ensure successful business operations in selected foreign countries.
  5. Assess management problem/issue, generate alternative solutions, and make recommendations.
  6. Communicate effectively in oral and in written form.

Management majors are strongly recommended to take ENC 4264 Managerial Communications early in their major studies.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 and ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None  SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 None
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements (18 credit hours)

Students must complete eighteen (18) hours of Management Science courses. At least twelve (12) hours must be taken in residence at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all major coursework at USFSM. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all Management Science courses that are counted toward the major requirements.

Required Courses (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
QMB 3500 Principles of Management Science 3 PR: QMB 2100 with a minimum passing grade of C (not C-)
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 PR: Minimum grade of C- in ACG 2071 or QMB 2100 or STA 2023 or STA 2122
QMB 4700 Business Decision Modeling 3 PR: QMB 2100, ISM 3431
QMB 4690 Lean Operations and Six Sigma 3 PR: QMB 2100, QMB 3200, ISM 3431

Elective Courses (6 credit hours)

Choose two (2) of the following courses.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISM 3232 Business Application Development 3 COPR: ISM 3011 with a grade of C or better (not C-)
ISM 3115 Business Informatics 3 PR: ISM 3011
ISM 4212 Database Design and Administration 3 PR: ISM 3113 with a grade of C or better (not C-)
QMB 4250 Business Analytics 3 PR: QMB 3200

 


Marketing

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 52.1401
Major Code MKT
Department Code MKT
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/marketing/

Marketing is a dynamic field with many dimensions, including product selection and planning, product distribution, pricing and promotion. Marketing poses many challenges and yields generous rewards for those who meet these challenges. Marketing operations are carried out domestically and internationally in virtually all business organizations that offer a product or service. Many marketing concepts are applicable to the operations of non-profit organizations such as governmental, educational, and healthcare institutions, as well as charitable and political campaigns.

Marketing operations provide the most visible links between the firm or institution and its many publics. Marketing deals with people who are constantly changing in their needs, wants, and desires; and coupled with these changing tastes is a fiercely competitive environment sustained by all the resources of a rapidly evolving technology. These forces lead to much of the challenge and dynamic nature of marketing.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the Marketing Major develops the ability to do the following:

  • The ability to collect, analyze, and use information about customers, competitors, and the environment (develop and use primary and secondary research data).
  • The ability to develop marketing plans, including strategies designed to achieve specific goals.
  • The ability to organize and analyze data, draw and support conclusions, and make appropriate recommendations.
  • The ability to develop effective, persuasive presentations of marketing concepts and including the ability to organize ideas and data, use presentation software and other audio visual aids, and respond incisively to questions about presentation elements.
  • The ability to develop an organized, structured, well-written paper that demonstrates the ability to organize ideas and data.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 and ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business & Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 USFSM considers STA 2023 as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 None
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements (18 credit hours)

Students must complete a minimum of eighteen (18) hours in marketing beyond MAR 3023. At least twelve (12) hours must be taken in residence at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all major coursework including Basic Marketing (MAR 3023) at USFSM.  Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all Marketing courses that are counted toward the major requirements.

Required Courses (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 PR: MAR 3023
MAR 3613 Marketing Research 3 PR: QMB 2100 or QMB 2150 or STA 2014, or STA 2023 with a grade of “C-” or better and MAR 3023 with a grade of “C” or better For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAR 3400 Professional Selling 3 PR: MAR 3023; CI
MAR 4333 Promotion Management 3 PR: MAR 3023; CI
MAR 4824 Marketing Management Problems 3 PR: MAR 3823 and MAR 3613 with a grade of “C-” or better; Senior Standing
MAR xxxx 3 Choose any additional upper-level MAR course

 


 


Risk Management and Insurance

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 52.1701
Major Code RMN
Department Code RMI
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/risk-management-insurance/

The Risk Management/Insurance major prepares individuals to plan, manage, and analyze the financial and monetary aspects of the insurance industry. It provides a broad based, analytical program for students anticipating a career in either the property casualty insurance or life/health insurance fields. The curriculum in risk management/insurance provides students with the knowledge necessary to analyze the impact of risk and uncertainty upon people, businesses and society. Graduates in risk management and insurance find a variety of career opportunities open to them as risk analysts within the business community and government; as brokers/agents providing professional risk management counseling and market placement services for clients; as consultants and personal financial planners; and in the underwriting, marketing, claims adjusting, planning, governmental relations, and financial management activities of insurers.

The major is designed to ensure that graduates are familiar with the tools of risk management and insurance decision making and that they possess the skills to stay abreast of the developments in the field. It includes preparation in principles of accounting, financial instruments, capital planning, asset and debt management, budgeting, financial analysis, and investment portfolio management. Risk Management/Insurance graduates will understand the functions and operations of insurance providers. Course content is designed to provide majors with an appreciation of cooperative work skills and to enhance their verbal and written communication skills.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the Risk Management/Insurance Major develops the ability to do the following:

  • The evaluation of insurance products by identifying key economic and environmental issues to determine appropriate strategies.
  • In-depth knowledge of Risk Management/Insurance management; the underlying principles and the analytical techniques involved in financial planning and decision-making.
  • A comprehensive understanding of the various functions and operations of insurance providers and markets.
  • Critical thinking and analytical abilities, including the capability to engage in inductive, deductive, and quantitative reasoning and to construct sound arguments.
  • The ability to communicate effectively, both on an individual basis and in collaboration with others.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students must complete the following courses (or equivalents) with a grade of C or higher in each course and an overall 2.00 GPA.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offerings
Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or ACG X001 & ACG X011 ACG 2021 3
ACG X071 or ACG X301 ACG 2071 3
CGS X100C, CGS X100, CGS X530, CGS X570, CGS X060, CGS X531, CGS X000, ISM X000, or CGS X518 CGS 2100 3
ECO X013 ECO 2013 3
ECO X023 ECO 2023 3
MAC X233 or MAC X230 MAC 2233 3
STA X023, STA X122, or QMB X100 STA 2023 3

Required Communication Courses

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
or
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions None
AND
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD

Business Foundation Required Courses (21 credit hours)

Foundation Courses in business require a minimum grade of C in each foundation course with an overall 2.00 GPA.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
QMB 3200 Business and Economic Statistics II 3 PR: MAC 2233 or MAC 2241, QMB 2100 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 Junior Standing
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; This course should be taken in the final semester of the program.

Additionally, all business students are required to select at least one course that deals with contemporary international topics. This course can be included in the business, non-business, or elective category. Consult with a business advisor for approved courses.

Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of twenty one (21) credit hours of upper-level courses beyond FIN 3403. At least twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all major coursework at USFSM. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in all finance courses that are counted toward the major requirements.

Courses taken as part of the major, minor, or concentration, cannot be used on other majors, minors or concentrations within the College of Business.

Required Courses (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 PR: FIN 3403
MAR 4841 Services Marketing 3 PR: MAR3023 with grade of “C” or better
RMI 3011 Principles of Insurance 3 None
RMI 4115 Life and Health Insurance Products 3 PR: RMI 3011 with a grade of “C” or better
RMI 4292 Property & Casualty Insurance Operations 3 PR: RMI 3011

Electives (6 credit hours)

Students must complete two (2) of the following for a total of six (6) credit hours.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 4504 Principles of Investments 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023
MAR 3400 Professional Selling 3 PR: MAR 3023
RMI 4930 Special Topics in Risk Management/Insurance 3 PR: RMI 3011 with a grade of “C” or better
RMI 4941 Risk Management/Insurance Internship 3 PR: RMI 3011

Minors

Students are required to apply for a College of Business minor on their graduation application.


 


Accounting

The minor in Accounting (ACCM) is available to Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade of “C” or better must be earned in each of the four upper-level accounting courses taken at USFSM. A grade point average of 2.00 or higher must be achieved in all minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions. All attempts will be included in the GPA unless grade forgiveness has been used. Only one grade forgiveness may be used in the minor.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ACG 3103 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 PR: ACG 2071 , ACG 2021 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-); CR: ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better (not C-)
ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; CR: ACG 3103 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ACG 3401 Accounting Information Systems 3 PR: ACG 3103, ACG 3341 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
TAX 4001 Concepts of Federal Income Taxation 3 PR: ACG 3103, ACG 3341 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-

 


Business Analytics

The minor in Business Analytics (GBLM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
QMB 4250 Business Analytics 3 PR: QMB 3200
QMB 4700 Business Decision Modeling 3 PR:QMB 2100, ISM 3431 For USFSM students, STA 2023 can serve as equivalent to QMB 2100
ISM xxxx or QMB xxxx 6 Choose any two additional upper-level ISM or QMB courses

Total 12 credit hours


 


Business Informatics

The minor in Business Informatics (GBIM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.

At least nine (9) hours of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISM 3115 Business Informatics 3 PR: ISM 3011
ISM 3232 Business Application Development 3 PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4212 Database Design and Administration 3 PR: ISM 3113 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM xxxx or QMB xxxx 3 Choose any one additional upper-level ISM or QMB course

 


 


Business Operations and Quality Management

The minor in Business Operations and Quality Management (GBOM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.

At least nine (9) hours of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 PR: QMB 2100 or  STA 2023 or STA 2122 or ACG 2071 with a grade of  “C-“
QMB 4690 Lean Operations and Six Sigma 3 PR: QMB 2100, QMB 3200, ISM 3431 USFSM considers STA 2023  as equivalent to QMB 2100
QMB 4700 Business Decision Modeling 3 PR: QMB 2100, ISM 3431 USFSM considers STA 2023  as equivalent to QMB 2100
ISM xxxx or QMB xxxx 3 Choose one additional upper-level ISM or QMB course

 


Finance

The minor in Finance (FINM) is available to Accounting, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.  Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in finance courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 4504 Principles of Investments 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
FIN 4414 Advanced Corporation Finance 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
FIN xxxx 3 Choose one additional upper-level FIN course

 


General Business

The minor in General Business (GBAM) is not available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.  Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in General Business courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least twelve (12) hours of the required eighteen (18) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ACG 3074 Managerial Accounting for Non-Business Majors 3 Does not count towards major or CPA requirements; Not available for credit for Business majors ACG 2021 and ACG 2071 can be substituted
ECO 1000 Basic Economics 3 No credit after completing either ECO 2023 or ECO 2013 ECO 2013 and ECO 2023 can be substituted
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 None
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023; CI

 


Information Technology

The minor in Information Technology (ITCM) is not available to Cyber Security & Information Technology majors (B.S.Cy.S.I.T. or B.S.A.S.Cy.S.I.T).

This minor will strengthen the non-IT student’s resume by increasing and differentiating the student’s effectiveness in the workplace.  It provides the framework for students to be more productive in keeping with their individual strengths, needs, and goals.

Requirements: 

Students will need to complete at least  twelve (12) credit hours from the courses listed below with at least a C- in each course (ex. ISM 4212 requires a C).  Please be aware some courses may have prerequisites which will have to be completed outside of the twelve (12) credits required for the minor.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COP 2030 Programming Concepts I 3 None
GEB 3016 Business Enterprise Management 3 None Students may take GEB 3016 or GEB 2011, not both
CGS 4858 Web Design and Development (HTML5) 3 PR: COP 3718 with a minimum grade of C-
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 None
CIS 4510 IT Project Management 3 CI
ISM 4212 Database Design and Administration 3 PR:  ISM 3113 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
COP 4663 Mobile Applications Development 3 PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375

 


International Business

The minor in International Business (ITBM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.  Competency to effectively communicate in a foreign language is strongly advised. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in international business courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

At least nine (9) semester credit hours in the minor must be selected from a set of approved upper-level international business courses.  One of the courses in the minor, relevant to the student’s international area of interest, can be an approved area studies course, or other course, taken outside the College of Business.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 3604 International Finance 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4382 Global Information Systems 3 PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
MAN 4600 International Management 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; CI; Senior Standing
MAR 4156 International Marketing 3 PR: MAR 3023

 


Management

The minor in Management (MANM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Marketing, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.  Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in Management courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least nine (9) hours of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 3301 Human Resource Management 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023; CI
MAN 4600 International Management 3 PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better; CI; Senior Standing

 


Marketing

A minor in Marketing (MKTM) is available to Accounting, Finance, General Business, Management, Management Science, and Risk Management & Insurance majors only.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework and in all minor courses completed at other institutions.  Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in MAR 3023 and all marketing courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 PR: MAR 3023
MAR xxxx Choose any three (3) upper-level MAR courses (excluding MAR 4824)

 


 


Risk Management/Insurance

The minor in Risk Management/Insurance (RSKM) is available to all majors.

A grade point average of 2.00 or better must be achieved in the minor coursework at USFSM and in all minor courses completed at other institutions. Students are required to earn a “C” or higher in risk management courses that are counted toward the minor requirements.

At least nine (9) of the required twelve (12) credit hours must be taken in residence at USFSM.

Please note, courses used in a major, may not apply to the minor.

Requirements (12 credit hours)

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

RMI 3011 and RMI 4292 can be applied toward the Chartered Property and Casualty Underwriter (CPCU) designation, a prominent industry credential.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
RMI 3011 Principles of Insurance 3 None
RMI 4292 Property and Casualty Insurance Operations 3 CP: RMI 3011
RMI 4941 Risk Management/Insurance Internship 3 PR: RMI 3011

 

Electives (3 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023; CI
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 PR: MAR 3023

 



 


Information Technology (Various Specializations)

Students may choose four (4) undergraduate technology related certificates. Students do not need to be enrolled in a degree program to obtain the certificate.  Certificates are available to all majors including B.S.A.S. Cyber Security & IT and B.S. Cyber Security & IT-degree seeking students.  For students enrolled in an IT certificate program, the courses will count toward a B.S.A.S. Cyber Security & IT  or a B.S. Cyber Security & IT degree if students decide to pursue a degree at a later date.

Students must achieve a B- in each course for it to count toward the certificate. Certificate courses can be completed in one full year if the student takes all courses available each semester.  Course equivalencies need approval from the college dean.


 


Application Development

Required Courses (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COP 3515 Program Design for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 2512 or equivalent, CI
COP 3259 Advanced Programming in JAVA 3 PR: COP 2250
COP 3718 Database Systems Design 3 PR: COP 2700
CIS 3615 Secure Software Development 3 PR: COP 3515 with a grade of “C-” or better

Required Courses – Choose one  (1) of the following courses (3 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CIS 4510 IT Project Management 3 CI
CEN 3722 Human Computer Interfaces for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 3515

Total 15 credit hours


 


Cyber Security

Required Course (3 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 None

Students may choose any four (4) of the following courses (12 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CNT 4403 Network Security and Firewalls 3 PR: CNT 4104 Strongly recommend CGS 3373C & CGS 3374C. See advisor to request permit for waiver of prerequisite
CIS 4365 Computer Security Policies and Disaster Preparedness 3 PR: CIS 3360
CIS 4368 Database Security and Audits 3 PR: COP 3718
CIS 4203 Cyber Forensics and Investigations 3 PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104, CIS 3360
CIS 4204 Ethical Hacking 3 PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104
CIS 4216 Aggressive Hacking: What Hackers Do 3 PR: CGS 3373C, CGS 3374C, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4369 Web Application Security 3 PR: COP 3718 and CGS 3853
CIS 4387 Mobile and Wireless Security 3 PR: CGS 3373C, CGS 3374C, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better

Total 15 credit hours


 


Mobile Application Development

Required Courses (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CGS 3853 Web Systems for IT 3 PR: CEN 3722
CIS 4387 Mobile and Wireless Security 3 PR: CGS 3373C, CGS 3374C, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
COP 3515 Program Design for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 2512 or equivalent; CI
COP 3259 Advanced Programming in JAVA 3 PR: COP 2250
COP 4663 Mobile Applications Development 3 PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375C

Total 15 credit hours


 


Web Design and Development

Required Courses (15 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CGS 3853 Web Systems for IT 3 PR: CEN 3722
CIS 4369 Web Application Security 3 PR: COP 3718 and CGS 3853
COP 3718 Database Systems Design 3 PR: COP 2700
COP 4663 Mobile Applications Development 3 PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375
COP 4834 Data-Driven Web Sites 3 Junior or Senior Standing; CI  Strongly Recommend CGS 3850 and COP 3718

Total 15 credit hours


 


College of Hospitality & Tourism Leadership

Email hospitality@sar.usf.edu
Location SMC-A319
Website usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-hospitality-and-tourism-leadership/
Advising Student Services, SMC-C107, (941) 359-4330

Mission

The College of Hospitality and Tourism Leadership (CHTL) at USFSM provides an intellectual, collaborative, ethical, inclusive learning environment for students pursuing leadership positions in hospitality management and graduate leaders to serve citizens of Florida, the U.S., and the world.

The Bachelors of Science degree in Hospitality Management has a general business foundation with specialized hotel and restaurant management courses that equip students to approach problem solving in a disciplined and systematic manner.  Skill and employability standards have been merged with challenging thinking and problem-solving skills.  USFSM graduates are highly marketable and competitive at all levels – regional, national, and global.  CHTL offers one hospitality undergraduate major and one graduate program.

The Hospitality Management program utilizes an Advisory Board which is composed of leaders from major hospitality related corporations and organizations.  Periodic reviews of course curriculum and enhancements prepare students for future career challenges.


 



Admission Requirements

Admission to CHTL is open to all students who have been accepted to USFSM and declare the (HMA) hospitality major.  Students who have credits from other institutions may need to provide copies of course descriptions from the catalog for purposes of determining credit towards the major requirements at USFSM.


Graduation Requirements

Unless otherwise stipulated below, students in CHTL majors must meet all graduation requirements of USFSM.  In addition, CHTL majors must meet the following requirements of the college.

  1. All transfer work will be reviewed by the advising office and the Dean of CHTL.
  2. Students must earn at least a 2.00 overall GPA, USFSM GPA, and in the major to be certified for graduation.
  3. At least 50% of the major coursework must be completed at USFSM.

 



 


Hospitality Management

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 52.0901
Major Code HMA
Department Code DEA
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/hospitality-management/

Mission Statement

The Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management, in CHTL at the USFSM, prepares graduates for global leadership positions in the hospitality industry through foundational knowledge of hospitality operations and experiences that develop critical thinkers who promote diversity, ethical responsibility, lifelong learning, and community engagement.

Intended Learning Outcomes

Bachelor of Science in Hospitality Management Student Learning Outcomes: Upon graduation, students in the Hospitality Management Program will be able to do the following:

  1. Identify and apply business concepts and skills relevant to the operational areas of hospitality management.
  2. Describe and apply the fundamental principles of leadership and model the behavior of effective leaders.
  3. Demonstrate effective communication skills.
  4. Analyze information and make decisions using critical thinking and problem solving skills.
  5. Evaluate diversity and ethical considerations relevant to the hospitality industry.

Industry Experience

Students must complete a total of 1000 hours of industry experience.

  • 700 hours prior, concurrent or subsequent to taking HFT 4945
  • 300 hours while enrolled in HFT 4945

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

State Prerequisite Course USFSM Course Offering
 Course Number Credit Hours
ACG X021 or ACG X022 or (ACF X001 and ACF X011) ACG 2021  3
ACG X071 ACG 2071  3
ECO X013 ECO 2013  3
ECO X023 ECO 2023  3

 

Program of Study

Upper-Level Pillar Requirements (3 courses*)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
Community Engagement & Diversity:
HFT 3894 International Food & Culture 3 None SMCD
or
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD
Communication & Critical Thinking:
HFT 4295* Hospitality Leadership & Strategic Management 3 PR: HFT 3503, HFT 4221 SMCC
Leadership & Ethics:
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership Ethics 3 None SMLE
or
MAN 3025* Principles of Management 3 None SMLE

*MAN 3025 and HFT 4295 are core courses in the major.

Required Communications Courses (6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 None
or
SPC 2608 Public Speaking 3 None SMEL
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD
or
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122

 Required Core Courses (49 credit hours) no grade lower than “C-“ and 2.00 GPA

**Students accepted in the Accelerated BS+MS Hospitality Management  program will take the graduate versions of the courses notated and must earn an “A”.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
FSS 3231 Introduction to Food Production Management 3 None
HFT 3003 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 None
HFT 3263** Restaurant Management 3 PR: HFT 3003, FSS 3231   
HFT 3423** Hospitality Information Systems 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3424 Cost Control in Hospitality Operations 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3503** Hospitality Marketing and Sales 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership Ethics 3 None SMLE
HFT 3803C Restaurant Operations: Advanced Food & Beverage Management 3 FSS 3231 and HFT 3003 with a grade of “C” or better
HFT 4221 Human Resources Management 3 PR: HFT 3003, MAN 3025
HFT 4253** Lodging Management 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4295 Hospitality Leadership & Strategic Management 3 PR: HFT 3503, HFT 4221 SMCC, 6ACM
HFT 4323 Facilities Management in Hospitality Operations 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4471 Management Accounting & Finance in the Hospitality Industry 3 PR: HFT 3003, ACG 2071, ACG 2021
HFT 4937 Hospitality Speaker Series 1 None Course may be repeated twice as an elective, to total 3 credits.
HFT 4945 Hospitality Advanced Internship 3 Senior Standing; S/U 300 required internship hours must be completed during HFT 4945 within the Hospitality Industry.  Departmental approval needed and must be in senior standing.

Approved Electives (5 credit hours)

Student may choose any upper level HFT courses from the following.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
HFT 3700 Tourism Management 3 None
HFT 3770 Cruise Line Operations and Management 3 None
HFT 3861 Beverage Management 3 None
HFT 3864 Introduction to Beer Science 3 None
HFT 3894 International Food & Culture 3 None SMCD
HFT 4277 Club Management 3 None
HFT 4243 Issues in Hospitality Management 3 None
HFT 4468 Hospitality Revenue Management 3 None
HFT 4757 Event Management 3 None
HFT 4930 Special Topics in Hospitality 1-3 None
HFT 4937 Hospitality Speaker Series 1 None Course repeatable twice, to total 3 credits.

Lower-Level Electives

HFT 2930, Special Topics in Hospitality, may be used to satisfy any outstanding lower-level electives. Must see academic advisor regarding this course.


 


Hospitality Management, BS+MS Accelerated Program

Qualified undergraduate hospitality majors who want to pursue a master’s degree in Hospitality Management may apply to participate in an accelerated program. The BS+MS program allows undergraduates to take 12 graduate level credits that will count toward both their BS and MS in Hospitality Management.

Qualifications for Admission to the BS+MS

  • Hospitality Management Major
  • Experience in Hospitality Industry (At least 1000 working hours)
  • Senior year status (completed at least 90 credits)
  • Overall GPA of 3.33; GPA of 3.50 in Hospitality Major
  • Unofficial transcript (degree audit is acceptable)
  • 2 letters of recommendations from faculty members
  • Successful interview with Hospitality faculty

Qualifications for Progressing from the BS to the MS

  • Students must obtain a minimum grade of “A” (4.00) in each graduate course that will also count toward the undergraduate degree.
    • HMG 6596, Marketing Leadership for Hospitality and Tourism
    • HMG 6507, Hospitality and Tourism Information Systems and Technology
    • HMG 6259, Lodging Management
    • HMG 6267, Restaurant and Foodservice Management
  • Upon satisfactory completion of all requirements for the undergraduate degree, students will be automatically admitted into the graduate program with 12 graduate credits already accomplished.
  • Students will require a permit from the Graduate Advisor to enroll for graduate credit.
  • Undergraduate students in the BS+MS program will pay the graduate per-credit rate for any graduate courses they take.

Application Process

  1. Students must apply to the accelerated BS+MS program when they have completed at least 90 credits in the Hospitality BS program.
  2. Students need to complete the Accelerated Program Application Form to be accepted into the program.  This form requires that students meet with undergraduate and graduate advisors to establish a plan of study, which includes the graduate courses that they will take.
  3. The completed form is then submitted to the College of Hospitality and Tourism Leadership along with the supporting documents.
  4. An interview is scheduled to meet with the Hospitality faculty.
  5. The College will make the decision on whether or not to admit the student into the accelerated program.

 



 


Hospitality Management

This international certificate is only available to universities that have executed an agreement with USFSM.

Five of the following courses (15 credits):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
HFT 3003 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 None
HFT 3263 Restaurant Management 3 PR: HFT 3003, FSS 3231 See advisor to request permit for waiver of prerequisite.
HFT 3423 Hospitality Information Systems 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3424 Cost Control in Hospitality Operations 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3503 Hospitality Marketing and Sales 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership Ethics 3 None  SMLE
HFT 4221 Human Resources Management 3 PR: HFT 3003, MAN 3025
HFT 4253 Lodging Management 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4323 Facilities Management in Hospitality Operations 3 PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4471 Management Accounting and Finance in the Hospitality Industry 3 PR: HFT 3003, ACG 2071, ACG 2021
HFT XXXX Any upper-level hospitality course 3

 


 


College of Liberal Arts & Social Sciences

Location: SMC C263
Telephone: 941-359-4454
Website: usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-liberal-arts-and-social-sciences/
Advising: Student Services, SMC-C107, 941-359-4330

Mission

The College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS) is an interdisciplinary community of scholars bound by a shared commitment to the study of human ideas and experience, critical inquiry, creative expression, and open discourse.  As researchers, our individual inquiries result in scholarly publications that advance the body of knowledge in our particular fields.  As teachers, we instill these scholarly skills, values, and knowledge in our students.  As faculty, we lend our skills to meet the needs of the various communities in which we live.  Graduates of programs in the CLASS Department of Liberal Arts, the Department of Social Sciences and the School of Education are well prepared for employment or further academic study.


 



Admission Requirements

Students who have been accepted to USFSM may be admitted to pursue any majors in the Department of Liberal Arts or in the Department of Social Sciences of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences (CLASS); however, they must apply for admittance to the CLASS School of Education. At New-student Orientation, students submit a “declaration of major” form for degrees of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, or they submit an “application to major” form for a degree in Education (See Elementary Education).


 


General Requirements

All CLASS majors must meet the following requirements of the college.

  • Only courses earning credit at or above the minimum grade requirement are credited toward the degree.  Any course in which the grade earned is below the program requirement must be retaken; however, the original grade will still affect the GPA unless it is retaken under the grade-forgiveness allowance.
  • Students may use only one directed-study/-research/-readings course (for a maximum of 4 credits) for elective credit in the major; additional directed-study credit may be applied to hours outside the major.  Directed-study/-research/-readings courses require a professor’s permission and the dean’s approval.
  • No S/U credit can be applied to the major, unless S/U is the only grading option for the course.  In Liberal Arts and Social Sciences, a maximum of 20 S/U credits are allowed; in School of Education, a maximum of 21 S/U credits are allowed.  Requests for S/U grading must be approved by the professor and submitted to the dean by the end of week three of the term. All work for S/U credit is graded.
  • Students should take all “core” courses in the major at USFSM unless they have been accepted as transfer credit by the department faculty upon admittance.
  • If the degree requirements allow 5-6 general elective courses outside the major, students are encouraged to use those credits to pursue a minor in another subject area that will be recorded on the transcript. In most cases, minors are composed of 15-18 credits.

 


Graduation Requirements

Unless otherwise stipulated below, students in CLASS majors must meet all graduation requirements of USFSM.   In addition, CLASS majors must meet the following requirements of the college.

  • Unless otherwise stipulated below, students must earn at least a C (not C-) in all required courses and prerequisites of the major or concentration within a major, minors and certificates.
  • At least 50% of the major coursework must be completed at USFSM.
  • For B.A. degrees, students must complete the Foreign Language Exit Requirement by passing or exempting the first two 4-credit courses of a foreign language.

 


General Studies, B.A., B.S.

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 24.0101
Major Code GNS
Department Code DEA
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-liberal-arts-and-social-sciences/

Recognizing that many prospective students have relocated to the Sarasota-Manatee region, USFSM hopes to serve those who have accrued college credit elsewhere and now seek to complete an undergraduate degree in a timely and economical manner.  The B.A. or B.S. degree in General Studies is designed to accommodate as much transferred credit as possible while developing a broad base of knowledge and skills for a variety of career applications.

Mission

The mission for the Bachelor of General Studies major (GNS) is to develop college-level generalized knowledge and competency.  Therefore, students pursue three content areas of concentration; competency in effective writing and critical thinking; and conversance in concepts of leadership, ethics, diversity, and civic engagement.

This is a “degree completion” major intended to serve students who, for a variety of reasons, might not seek or be eligible for any of the other major options at USFSM.  The GNS is not intended for currently enrolled USFSM students making satisfactory progress toward degree completion.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the B.A. or B.S. degree in General Studies develops the ability to do the following:

  • Demonstrate conversance in the essential facts and/or skills of a concentration area, as determined by the discipline faculty.
  • Demonstrate conversance in the essential principles, theories, and/or problems of a concentration area, as determined by the discipline faculty.
  • Think critically in analysis of problems related to the concentration areas.
  • Write analytic argument effectively and correctly.

Admissions Requirements

In order to be admitted into the Bachelor of General Studies (GNS) program at USFSM, applicants must:

  • Have satisfactorily completed at least 60 credits at a regionally accredited college or university
  • Be in good standing with the most recent former educational institution
  • Meet USFSM general admissions standards for transfer students
  • Be approved for admittance to the GNS program by the dean of the College of Liberal Arts  and Social Sciences (CLASS)

Admissions Process

  • After admission to USFSM, meet with the CLASS academic advisor
  • With the advisor, complete the GNS Curriculum Audit
  • Fill out and submit to the advisor a GNS Applicant Profile
  • If currently a USFSM student, submit a letter from your current dean supporting your request to change your major to GNS

Policies

Students majoring in General Studies must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and CLASS.

GNS majors must earn at least a C (not C-) in all concentration courses and the capstone course.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites for the General Studies degree program.

Program of Study

The General Studies degree is not intended for students who enter USFSM with fewer than 60 credits.

A minimum of 37 semester hours of major coursework is required of all undergraduate majors in General Studies.

  • Students must meet with an advisor to declare three (3) areas of concentration when they declare the General Studies major. Each concentration must have at least three upper-level courses (9 credits).
  • One (1) concentration may be entirely transfer credit.
  • Two of the three concentrations, which may include transfer credit, will be examined in the last semester and the two selected will be those with the most USFSM credit.
  • Either within their concentrations or as electives, students must take upper-level courses with the following emphases:
    • writing
    • critical thinking
    • leadership and ethics
    • diversity and engagement
  • In the final semester, students must take a capstone course (SLS 3113, 1 credit), in which they will take essay exams in two of their areas of concentration.

Degree Requirements

LOWER-LEVEL CURRICULUM – 60 credits

Required:

  • General Education Curriculum – 36 credit (exempt for transfers with completed Florida Gen. Ed.)
  • USFSM Foundation Sequence – 3 credits (exempt for transfers with 60 credits)

For B.A. only:  Foreign Language Requirement (0-2 courses / 0-8 credits)

  • Satisfactory completion of SPN 1121 or tested competency at that level
  • Satisfactory completion of ASL 2150 or tested competency at that level

Electives: upper- or lower-level to bring credits to 60

 

UPPER-LEVEL CURRICULUM – 60 credits

Concentrations: (at least 12 upper-level courses, 36 credits)

Students choose three (3) concentrations.  Coursework done at another institution may be counted for concentration credit.  Only one concentration may be fully transfer credit; however, this concentration is limited to three (3) courses (9 credits), and may not be considered for examination.  At least two concentrations must be curricula offered at USFSM and include courses taken at USFSM.

  • Concentration A (4-5 upper-level courses, 12-15 credits) – Subject to examination
  • Concentration B (4-5 upper-level courses, 12-15 credits) – Subject to examination
  • Concentration C (3-4 upper-level courses, 9-12 credits)

Pillars: (can be satisfied through concentrations or electives)

  • Ethics and Leadership Pillars Course (1 course)
  • Community Engagement and Diversity Pillars Course (1 course)

Writing course: (1 upper-level course / 3 credits) (can be satisfied through concentrations or electives)
Course must be approved by the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences.

Critical Thinking course: (1 upper-level course) (can be satisfied through concentrations or electives)
Students should select an approved critical thinking course as listed on the IBCT website, usfsm.edu/ibct/ibct-certificate.

Capstone Course, SLS 3113 (1 credit, must be taken at USFSM): Students take an essay exam in each of two concentrations.  The exam average must be 70 or above for the student to pass this required course.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SLS 3113 Critical Thought for Academic Transitions 1 Permit required

Should be taken in the final semester of the major, except will not be offered in summer.

Students planning to complete in summer should try to complete concentrations before taking the capstone in spring, or they should plan to enroll in the capstone in fall.

Electives: Upper-level electives as needed to reach minimum of 42 upper-level credits.

If additional credits are needed to reach 120, students may choose upper or lower level electives.

 


 


Department of Liberal Arts

Mission 

The faculty of the Department of Liberal Arts are innovative scholars and teachers who are dedicated to fostering a life-long commitment to learning, knowledge, and inquiry.  We achieve this goal by developing critical thinking skills in our students, connecting lived experience to social issues, both historical and contemporary. Through our research, we contribute to knowledge creation in our fields of study as well as the betterment of our various societies. In our classes, we facilitate learning communities where students explore the broad, diverse, and interdisciplinary tapestry of the liberal arts, cultivating the analytical framework necessary to thrive in an ever-changing global landscape. The programs offered by the Department of Liberal Arts emphasize the analytical, community-engagement, and communication skills called for by many professions and graduate programs.


 



 


Applied Science, Leadership Studies

Degree Type: B.S.A.S.
CIP Code 24.0101
Major Code APS
Department Code DEA
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/applied-science/

The Bachelor of Science in Applied Science (B.S.A.S.) was developed under provisions from Florida legislation to recognize Associate in Science (A.S.) degree holders to pursue and acquire a bachelor’s degree. At USFSM, concentrations for the B.S.A.S. are available in CLASS, CHTL, and COB.  In CLASS, a B.S.A.S. degree can be pursued in Leadership Studies.

Mission

The curriculum for the B.S.A.S. degree concentration in Leadership Studies at USF Sarasota-Manatee provides students with a solid foundation in leadership theory and technique, applied both personally and professionally and understood from the perspective of the leader and the follower in diverse organizational contexts.

B.S.A.S. Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Students will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the significant facts, principles, concepts, and/or theories comprising their selected field of concentration.
  • In work appropriate to the following areas of concentration, students will be able to demonstrate the following functions of critical thinking: focus on the main idea, draw inferences, evaluate, analyze, and continue the progression of an idea.
  • In work appropriate to the following areas of concentration, students will be able to demonstrate the following functions of good writing: focused unity, coherent organization, relevant support, appropriate diction and syntax, correct grammar and mechanics for the discipline.

Leadership Studies Concentration (ALS)

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum of the B.S.A.S. Leadership Studies Concentration develops the ability to do the following:

  1. Leadership: Apply theoretical concepts of leadership to personal and organizational situations.
  2. Ethics: Apply ethical principles to decision making and practice in a variety of leadership situations.
  3. Critical Thinking: Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the consideration of problems related to leadership.
  4. Communication: Present written arguments on issues related to leadership using citations to support ideas.
  5. Diversity: Express self-awareness and behaviors that support effective and appropriate interaction in a variety of cultural contexts.
  6. Community Engagement: Actively engage in activities of personal or public concern that enrich the community and their leadership growth.

Policies

Students majoring in B.S.A.S. must meet all degree requirements of USFSM. The following policies also apply:

  • This degree program is available ONLY to A.S. graduates from Florida public institutions who have an overall “C” average (2.00) in all college-level courses accepted for transfer credit to USFSM.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites for this degree program.

Degree Requirements

Credits transferred in from completed A.S. degree

Requirements Credit Hours
General education 18
Lower-level credits from A.S. degree 42

Credits to be completed at USFSM

Requirements Credit Hours Notes
General education 18
Area of concentration 24-30 Three (3) credits of upper-level area of concentration may satisfy upper-level pillar requirement with approval from the college dean
Upper-level elective credits to meet degree requirements Variable
Upper-level pillar requirements Variable
Sequential foreign language courses if foreign B.S. language requirement is not fulfilled 0-8

Program of Study (8 courses, 24 credit hours)

Concentration Core  (6 courses, 18 credit hours)

Personal Systems Courses (2 courses, 6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3003 Introduction to Leadership Studies 3 None Should be taken first semester of the program
LDR 3263 Community Leadership Practicum 3 PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- 6ACM, SMCC; Capstone course, should be taken last semester of the program.  For USFSM students, LDR 3003 can serve as equivalent to LDR 2010; See advisor

Organizational Systems Courses (2 courses, 6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 None
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- For USFSM students, LDR 3003 can serve as equivalent to LDR 2010; See advisor

Global Systems Courses (2 courses, 6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None SMLE

Concentration Electives  Students should choose (2 courses, 6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None SMCD
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 None
EDF 3802 The Dynamics of Unity 3 None SMLE
EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 None SMCD
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law and Leadership Ethics 3 None SMLE
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
SOW 3210 The American Social Welfare System 3 None
SYD 3700 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 None
POS 4614 Constitutional Law I 3 PR: POS 2041

Students can elect to take a maximum of two (2) of their leadership concentration courses at other USF System Institutions.

Upper-Level B.S.A.S. Electives (variable credit hours)

  • For optimal career preparation, students are encouraged to take more Leadership courses as their BSAS electives.
  • They can also elect to take courses in related fields, such as Social Work, Psychology, or Sociology.
  • If needed, foreign language courses will need to be taken as electives.

Upper-Level Pillar Courses (3 courses)


 


English

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 23.0101
Major Code ENG
Department Code ENG
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/english/

In small seminar-style classes, students majoring in English develop deep appreciation of the literary texts and traditions of Britain and America as they learn to be thoughtful critics of various literary genres.  Many professions value the skills developed by this degree, such as reflective reading, critical thinking, effective writing, and articulate oral expression.

Mission

The B.A. degree in English with a concentration in British and American texts provides a solid foundation in the literary traditions of the English language, through the practice of informed literary criticism.  By the time English majors graduate, they are able to understand and analyze complex texts, write about and discuss them in meaningful, thoughtful terms, and critically evaluate them.  Students demonstrate their achievement of the degree’s intended outcomes in the Senior Seminar.  The program prepares students to argue productively and communicate effectively.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the B.A. degree in English develops the ability to do the following:

  • Analyze and evaluate literary texts in light of various cultural contextual issues that may impact their creation and/or reception.
  • Analyze and evaluate literature as an art form, evidencing certain aesthetic principles that are relative and dynamic.
  • Analyze and evaluate the diversity of human experience reflected in the canon of British and American literature.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills in the conduct of literary argument and the judicious use of primary and secondary textual support.
  • Write effective, correct scholarly prose, in accordance with MLA style.

Policies

Students majoring in English must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS, as well as the following:

  • A 2.50 GPA in the major is required for graduation
  • American Sign Language is not accepted to meet the foreign language requirement

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

The following required courses of the General Education curriculum are prerequisites for the English major:

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Number Course Number Credit Hours
ENC X101 or ENC XXXX(1) ENC 1101 3
ENC X102 or ENC  XXXX(1) ENC 1102 3
(1)Six semester hours of English coursework in which the student is required to demonstrate college-level English skills through multiple assignments.  Note: C or better is required for all coursework.

 

British and American Literature (LIT) Concentration Program of Study

A minimum of 39 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in English Literature, although students may elect to take more.

Degree Core (9 credits, should be taken at USFSM)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature 3 None 6ACM, SMHU; If not taken before, must be taken in first semester of upper-level work
ENG 3014 Introduction to Literary Methodology 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 Should be taken in first semester of upper-level work or immediately after LIT 2000 is completed; must be taken within first 30 upper-level hours
ENG 4934 Senior Literature Seminar 3 PR: ENG 3014; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; Should be taken in last semester; must be taken within last 30 upper-level hours

Degree Distribution Categories

Ten (10) courses (30 credits), at least two (2) of which must cover literature written prior to 1860, distributed as follows:  Courses that cover literature written prior to 1860 include AML 3031, AML 4111, ENL 3015, ENL 3230, ENL 3251, ENL 3331, ENL 3332, ENL 4122, ENL 4311, ENL 4338, ENL 4341, ENL 4501, LIT 3101, LIT 3202, and LIT 3374.  Some Selected Topics, Selected Authors, and Studies courses may also count toward this degree requirement; speak with an advisor.

1. One (1) of the following:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AML 3031 American Literature From the Beginnings to 1860 3  None  Pre-1860
AML 3032 American Literature From 1860 to 1912 3  None
AML 3051 American Literature From 1912-1945 3  None

2. Two (2) of the following:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENL 3015 British Literature to 1616 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3230 British Literature 1616-1780 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3251 British Literature 1780-1900 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3273 British Literature 1900-1945 3 None

3. Seven (7) of the following, at least two (2) of which must be 4000-level courses:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AML 3031 American Literature From the Beginnings to 1860 3 None Pre-1860
AML 3032 American Literature 1860 to 1912 3 None
AML 3051 American Literature 1912-1945 3 None
AML 3604 African American Literature 3 None  SMCD
AML 3630 U.S. Latino/Latina Literature in English 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 SMCD
AML 4111 Nineteenth-Century American Novel 3 None Pre-1860
AML 4121 Twentieth-Century American Novel 3 None
AML 4261 Literature of the South 3 None
AML 4300 Selected American Authors 3 None May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor; may be taken twice for credit with different topics
AML 4931 American Literary Movements and Genres 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
AML 4933 Studies in American Literature and Culture 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD
ENC 4311 Advanced Composition 3 PR: ENC 3310; CI
ENG 3014 Introduction to Literary Methodology 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102
ENG 4013 Literary Criticism 3 None
ENG 4060 History of the English Language 3 None
ENG 4906 Individual Research 1-4 None
ENG 4940 Internship in English 1-4 English Majors only
ENL 3015 British Literature to 1616 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3230 British Literature 1616-1780 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3251 British Literature 1780-1900 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3273 British Literature 1900-1945 3 None
ENL 3331 Early Shakespeare 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 3332 Late Shakespeare 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 4122 19th Century British Novel 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 4132 British Novel: Conrad to the Present 3 None
ENL 4303 Selected British Authors 3 None May cover pre-1860; check with an advisor; may be taken twice for credit with different topics
ENL 4311 Chaucer 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 4338 Advanced Studies in Shakespeare 3 PR: ENL 3331 or ENL 3332 Pre-1860
ENL 4341 Milton 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 4501 Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature 3 None Pre-1860
ENL 4930 Selected Topics 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
ENL 4931 Studies in British Literature and Culture 3 PR: ENC 1102 May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
LIN 4671 Traditional English Grammar 3 None
LIN 4680 Structure of American English 3 None
LIT 3022 Modern Short Prose 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102
LIT 3031 Survey of Poetry 3 None  SMCD
LIT 3043 Modern Drama 3 None  SMCD
LIT 3093 Contemporary Literature 3 None  SMCD
LIT 3101 Literature of the Western World Through the Renaissance 3 None Pre-1860
LIT 3102 Literature of the Western World Since the Renaissance 3 None Pre-1860
LIT 3144 Modern European Novel 3 None
LIT 3374 The Bible as Literature 3 None Pre-1860
LIT 3410 Religious and Philosophical Themes 3 None May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
LIT 3353 Literature, Race, and Ethnicity 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
LIT 3513 Literature, Gender, and Sexuality 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
LIT 3621 Literature of Climate Change: Climate Fiction 3 None SMLE
LIT 3930 Special Topics in English Studies 3 None May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor; may be taken twice for credit with different topics
LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women 3 None May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor
LIT 4930 Selected Topics in English Studies 3 None May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor; may be taken twice for credit with different topics
LIT 4931 Studies in World Literature and Culture 3 PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better May cover Pre-1860; check with an advisor

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the English degree allow for electives outside the major. Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies. Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement an English degree: Education, History, Leadership Studies, Political Science, Professional & Technical Communication, Sociology, or Spanish and Latin American Studies.


 


History

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 54.0101
Major Code HTY
Department Code HTY
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/history/

The B.A. in History encourages students to move beyond traditional memorization of material to a sophisticated level of thinking, analysis, and synthesis. Because of their highly developed critical thinking, writing, and presentational skills, accomplished history majors are attractive to many kinds of employers in any number of fields, as well as to graduate and professional schools. Many USFSM graduates in History have gone on to careers in law, library and information science, government, foreign service, politics, and education.

Mission

The History curriculum is designed to prepare students for a future in professions that require solid research, writing, and analytical skills and value a perspective informed by history. By the time History majors graduate, they should be able to write well organized and grammatically correct papers that contain clear thesis statements and evidence to support their arguments. Moreover, in each course, students will be trained in the evaluation of primary and secondary source materials, weighing the impact of historical context on the construction of documents – a skill we label “thinking historically.” During their senior year, students will demonstrate their acquired skills in the Pro-Seminar capstone course.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of historical context in analyzing the nature of past societies.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the practice of history and interpretations of the past have changed over time.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of methodologies and theoretical constructs currently employed by historians.
  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze works by historians and identify their arguments and interpretations.
  • Present the results of historical research in a logically organized, written paper that is grammatically correct and presents a thesis, supported by relevant documentation.

Policies

Students majoring in History must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS, as well as the following:

  • Students must have a USFSM GPA within the major of at least 2.25 before taking HIS 3930 (Research Methods in History), HIS 4104 and HIS 4936.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

Students are required to take six (6) credit hours of introductory history courses in the following prefixes.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Number Course Number Credit Hours
AFH XXXX    
AMH XXXX AMH 2010, AMH 2020 3
EUH XXXX EUH 2011, EUH 2012, EUH 2030, EUH 2031 3
LAH XXXX
ASH XXXX
HIS XXXX
WOH XXXX

Program of Study

A minimum of 33 credit hours in history.

Required Degree Core

Choose 0ne (1) additional course (3 credits) from the following list selected so that, when combined with those taken as State-Mandated Common Prerequisites, create a two-course sequence:  AMH 2010/2020, EUH 2011/2012, or EUH 2030/2031.  The course cannot be counted if taken as a state mandated prerequisite.  The course may be taken before beginning the major, but if not, should be taken in first semester of work in the major, and must be taken within first 30 hours of the program.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 2010 American History I 3 None SMSS
AMH 2020 American History II 3 None SMSS
EUH 2011 Ancient History I 3 None
EUH 2012 Ancient History II 3 None
EUH 2030 Modern European History I 3 None
EUH 2031 Modern European History II 3 None

Student must take the following courses (9 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
HIS 3930 Special Topics: Research Methods in History 3 History major status; at least 6 credits in History and 2.25 History GPA Taken when junior status is achieved and before HIS 4936
HIS 4104 Theory and Methods of History 3 History Majors only with major GPA of 2.25 Taken when junior status is achieved and before HIS 4936
HIS 4936 Pro-Seminar in History 3 PR: HIS 4104; History Majors only with 2.25 major GPA; DPR 6ACM, SMCC; Taken when senior status is achieved and after HIS 4104

Required Degree Electives

The remaining seven (7) courses (21 credit hours) may be chosen from any upper-level History course. Below is a sample listing of courses offered at USFSM, but this list is not conclusive:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary Era 3 None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 None
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 None
AMH 3571 African American History to 1865 3 None
AMH 3572 African American History since 1865 3 None
EUH 3142 Renaissance and Reformation 3 None
EUH 3181 Medieval Culture 3 None
EUH 3401 Classical Greece 3 None
EUH 3402 Age of Alexander 3 None
EUH 3412 Roman Republic 3 None
EUH 3413 Roman Empire 3 None
EUH 3501 British History to 1688 3 None
HIS 3930 Special Topics: Fascism in 20th Century Europe 3 None
HIS 3930 Special Topics: Hitler and the Nazis 3 None
HIS 3930 Special Topics: World War II in Literature and Film 3 None
HIS 3930 Special Topics: Ancient World in Film 3 None
HIS 3930 Special Topics: Sport and Society in Ancient Greece 3 None

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the History degree allow for electives outside the major. Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies. Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement a History degree: Education, English Literature, Political Science, Sociology, or Spanish and Latin American Studies.


 


Professional & Technical Communication

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 23.1303
Major Code PTC
Department Code ENG
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/professional-and-technical-communication/

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Professional and Technical Communication develops the competencies sought by those who employ professional and technical communicators in a rapidly shifting workplace.

Mission

The B.A. in Professional and Technical Communication (PTC) from USF Sarasota-Manatee attests to the achievement of skills necessary for a successful career in professional and technical communication. Before graduating, PTC students must define and solve communication problems and employ effective strategies, approaches, and media tools for meeting the needs of those who will hire them as professionals.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Create clear, concise, and complete messages that meet needs of intended users and readers.
  • Consistently manage project deadlines.
  • Create and transmit messages in such diverse media as print, audio, video, in-person presentations, and internet.
  • Apply knowledge and sound judgment to effectively communication concepts, theories, tactics, and strategies appropriate for intended project results.
  • Interpret and edit messages from advanced Subject Matter Experts (SME’s) and transmit said messages effectively to non-expert users.
  • Apply knowledge and sound judgement to communicate effectively the concepts, theories, tactics, and strategies appropriate for intended project results.

Policies

Students majoring in Professional and Technical Communication must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS, as well as the following:

  • A 2.50 GPA in the major is required for graduation
  • American Sign Language is not accepted to meet the foreign language requirement

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Number Course Number Credit Hours
ENC 1101 or ENC XXXX (equivalent to English Composition I) ENC 1101 3
ENC 1102 or ENC XXXX (equivalent to English Composition II) ENC 1102 3
ENC 2210 ENC 2210 3
SPC 2608 SPC 2608 3

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in Professional and Technical Communication.  This consists of twelve (12) credit hours from the PTC electives, twelve (12) credit hours from the business electives or twelve (12) credit hours from the IT electives, or a combination of both Business and IT electives.

Required Degree Core (12 credit hours — must be taken at USFSM)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMLE; Usually taken in first upper-level term
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 None
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing  Internship 3 PR: ENC 3242 with a minimum grade of C; PTC majors, minors, or certificate seekers only; Approved application and formal internship agreement Usually taken in penultimate term
ENC 4268 Senior Seminar in Professional & Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 4946; Senior Standing. (Note: Seek approval for ENC 4946 Co-requisite if necessary to meet graduation schedule.) 6ACM, SMCC; Usually taken in final term

PTC Electives – Students must choose at least twelve (12) credit hours (4 courses) from the list below

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMCD
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 PR: Any one of the following: ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260, ENC 2210
ENC 4906 Professional & Technical Writing Independent Study 3 PR: Any two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4931 Selected Topics in Professional and Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 3250, ENC 2210, or ENC 3310; CI

Information Technology Electives  – Students may choose up to twelve (12) credits (4 courses) from the list below.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CGS 2100 Computers in Business 3 None
CEN 3722 Human Computer Interfaces for Information Technology 3 PR: COP 3515 and (COP 2513 or COP 2250)
COP 2030 Programming Concepts I 3 None
COP 2700 Database Systems Basics 3 PR: COP 2030
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 Applied Science (BSAS) Majors only
CIS 4510 IT Project Management 3 CI
CIS 4412 Information Technology Resource Management 3 Junior, Senior or Graduate Standing

Business Electives – Students may choose up to twelve (12) credits (4 courses) from the list below.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ACG 2021 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 None
ACG 2071 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 PR: ACG 2021 with a grade of C- or better
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 None SMSS
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 None
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 None SMLE
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 None

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the PTC degree allow for electives outside the major. Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies. Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement a PTC degree: English Literature, Leadership, Political Science, Sociology, or Spanish and Latin American Studies.


 



 


English

The minor in English (LITM) consists of a minimum of five (5) courses (15 credit hours).

One of the following (3 credits):
Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AML 3031 American Literature From the Beginnings to 1860 3 None
AML 3032 American Literature From 1860-1912 3 None
AML 3051  American Literature From 1912-1945 3 None
One of the following (3 credits):
Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENL 3015 British Literature to 1616 3 None
ENL 3230 British Literature 1616-1780 3 None
ENL 3251 British Literature 1780-1900 3 None
ENL 3273 British Literature 1900-1945 3 None
Any two upper-level courses (6 credits) with the following prefixes:
  • AML, ENG, ENL, LIN, or LIT; one must be at the 4000 level
An additional course at the 2000 level or higher (3 credits) with one of the following prefixes:
  • AML, ENG, ENL, or LIT

History

The minor in History (HTYM) consists of a minimum of eighteen (18) credit hours:

  • Six (6) credit hours of any two-course, lower-level EUH or AMH sequence AND
  • Twelve (12) credit hours of upper-level courses included in the History major with the following prefixes: AMH, EUH, LAH, AFH, ASH, WHO, or HIS

 


Leadership Studies

The Leadership Studies (LDSM) minor is recommended for those majoring in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, History, Criminology, Psychology and English. The minor consists of five courses, 15 credit hours. A minimum grade of a “C” (2.00) is required in each course. With permission of the College Dean, students can elect to take a maximum of 2 of their courses at other USF System Institutions. Please meet with your advisor if you’re able to acquire the minor.

Personal Systems

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3003 Introduction to Leadership Studies 3 None

Organizational Systems

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 None
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- USFSM considers LDR 3003 as equivalent to LDR 2010; See advisor

Global Systems

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None SMLE

 


Professional and Technical Communication

The minor in Professional and Technical Communication (PTCM) consists of a minimum of five (5) courses (15 credit hours). Any five (5) of the following courses (15 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 None
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122  SMLE
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122  SMCD
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 PR: Any one of the following: ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260, ENC 2210
ENC 4906 Professional & Technical Writing Independent Study 3 PR: Any two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4931 Selected Topics in Professional and Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 3250, ENC 2210, or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing Internship 3 PR: ENC 3242 with a minimum grade of C; Student must have an approved application and approved formal internship agreement; may not be repeated for credit

 


Spanish and Latin American Studies

The minor in Spanish and Latin American Studies (SLAM) consists of a minimum of five (5) courses (15 credit hours).  The following three (3) required courses (9 credit hours) build language competency beyond the introductory level.  Additionally, two (2) upper-level elective courses (6 credit hours) in prefixes SPN or LAS develop cultural understanding.

Requirements

Required Courses (9 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPN 2200 Spanish III 3 PR: SPN 1121 or equivalent
SPN 2201 Spanish IV 3 PR: SPN 2200 or equivalent
SPN 2240 Conversation I 3 PR: SPN 2201

 

Elective Courses (6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPN 3391 Latin American Cinema 3 PR: SPN 2240 with a minimum grade of C- or better Also accepted as PR: SPN 2200 with a minimum grade of C+
SPN 3520 Spanish-American Civilization 3 PR: SPN 2201 or equivalent Also accepted as PR: SPN 2200 with a minimum grade of C+
SPN 4470 Advanced Overseas Study 1-6 PR: SPN 2270; DPR Equivalent course substitutions may be used

 

 


 



 


Leadership Studies

The non-degree Certificate in Leadership Studies is designed for those individuals working in any professional field who seek a greater understanding of the characteristics of being a leader in their given career. The Leadership Studies certificate provides students an opportunity to study leadership from the personal, organizational and global levels. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and can benefit students in all areas of study. Courses are designed to give students a practical and theoretical grasp of leadership.

The following five (5) courses are required and consist of fifteen (15) credit hours. A minimum grade of a “B” (3.00) (not a B-) is required in each course. With permission of the College Dean, students can elect to take a maximum of two (2) of their courses at another USF System campus.

Required Courses

Personal

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3003 Introduction to Leadership Studies 3 None

Organizational

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 None
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- USFSM considers LDR 3003  as equivalent to LDR 2010; See advisor

Global

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None SMLE

 


Professional and Technical Communication

The Certificate in Professional and Technical Communication (PTC)  is open to students of diverse backgrounds who wish to pursue careers as professional writers and editors serving clients and employers in industry, business, government, and the professions or to use these writing/editing skills to supplement their training and enhance their employability in other professional fields.

Policies

  • Students can pursue a certificate in PTC while pursuing another degree or as a non-degree-seeking student.
  • Students wishing to apply for the PTC Certificate should contact their academic advisor or an instructor in the PTC program.
  • Admission will require an interview by email, phone or in person, and submission of a writing sample on a topic assigned by faculty.
  • Students must earn a B or higher (not B-) or higher in each course taken for the certificate.

Program of Study

A certificate in Professional and Technical Communication consists of five (5) ENC or COM courses, any of those listed below (15 credit hours).

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 None
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122  SMLE
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122  SMCD
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 or ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 2210 or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 PR: Any one of the following: ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260, ENC 2210
ENC 4906 Professional & Technical Writing Independent Study 3 PR: Any two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4931 Selected Topics in Professional and Technical Writing 3 PR: ENC 3250, ENC 2210, or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing Internship 3 PR: ENC 3242 with a minimum grade of C; Majors only; Student must have an approved application and approved formal internship agreement; this course may not be repeated for credit

 


 


Department of Social Sciences

Mission

The faculty of the Department of Social Sciences are engaged scholars and teachers who are dedicated to rigorous investigation and analysis of our social world and to developing critical thinking skills in our students that can be used to understand and address pressing social issues.  Through our research, we contribute to knowledge creation in our fields of study as well as the betterment of our communities.  Through our teaching, we educate students in the principles, theories, and methodologies informing the social sciences and encourage students to apply these skills in the communities in which they live.  The programs offered by the Department of Social Sciences emphasize research interpretation, application, and communication skills called for by many professions and graduate programs.


 



 


Criminology

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 45.0401
Major Code CCJ
Department Code CJP
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/criminology/

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Criminology provides students with the skills and knowledge needed in the wide variety of agencies that comprise the criminal justice system: these include law enforcement, detention, the judiciary, corrections, juvenile justice, probation and parole.  Also, the undergraduate program prepares criminology students to pursue a graduate degree in criminology or related disciplines.

Mission

The undergraduate program in Criminology introduces students to the theory, issues and methodology of the causes of crime and the criminal justice system. The program provides students with the critical thinking skills necessary for the consumption and production of criminological research. Upon graduation, students must be able to delineate the main theoretical explanations of crime and delinquency, demonstrate knowledge of research methods used in the fields of criminology and criminal justice, and provide an understanding of the structure and process of the U.S. system of criminal justice. Criminology students are required to take a capstone course where they produce a research paper to demonstrate their competencies in the above areas.  An Accelerated BA+MA Criminal Justice Program is available to students who meet specific requirements.

Intended Learning Outcomes

The curriculum for the B.A. degree in Criminology develops the ability to do the following:

  1. Summarize, apply and evaluate the structure of the U.S. system of criminal justice.
  2. Summarize and critique the theoretical explanations of crime and delinquency.
  3. Research Methods: Summarize, evaluate and critique research methods used in the fields of criminology and criminal justice.
  4. Critical Thinking: (a) Formulate vital questions and problems clearly; (b) Gather and assess relevant information; (c) Identify assumptions, alternatives and implications; (d) Develop well-reasoned conclusions and solutions.
  5. Communication: Communicate reasoning effectively; produce clear, concise, correct and convincing writing appropriate to the discipline.

Policies

Students majoring in Criminology must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS, as well as the following:

  • A minimum of 30 credit hours in the major coursework taken within the USF System

Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites or program prerequisites for the Criminology degree.

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in Criminology, although students may elect to take more.

Required Degree Core (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I 3 PR: C (2.0) or better in High
School Algebra or
Elementary Algebra CPT
score of 72 or better
6AMM, SMMA
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 None
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing
CCJ 3701 Research Methods in Criminal Justice I 3 PR:  CCJ 3117 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; Junior Standing
CCJ 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar (Variable Topics) 3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3701 6ACM, SMCC; Should be taken in the last semester at USFSM

Required Degree Electives*

The remaining seven (7) courses (21 credit hours) may be chosen from any upper-level Criminology courses.  Below is a sample listing of courses offered at USFSM, but this list is not conclusive.

*Students accepted in the Accelerated BA + MA Criminal Justice program may take up to 12 credits of graduate level electives to meet this undergraduate requirement.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3621 Patterns of Criminal Behavior 3 Junior Standing
CCJ 3336 Prisoner Reentry and Recidivism: When Inmates Come Home 3 None SMCD
CCJ 3644 White Collar Crime 3 None
CCJ 4604 Abnormal Behavior & Criminality 3 PR: CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
 CCJ 4910  Directed Research  1-3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
CCJ 4930 Critical Issues in Policing 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CJE 4114; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4933 Selected Topics in Criminology 3 PR:  CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI May be taken multiple times, as long as topics differ.
CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology 3 PR:  CCJ 3701 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; Senior Standing Cannot be used for core capstone credit.
 CCJ 4940  Internship For Criminal Justice Majors  3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; No more than 9 hours of CCJ 4940 will be accepted toward the elective hours required for the major; Senior Standing; S/U
CJC 4010 American Correctional System 3 PR: CCJ 3024  or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJC 4166  Alternatives to Incarceration  3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 PR: CCJ 3024  or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 4610 Criminal Investigation 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; CI
CJL 3110  Substantive Criminal Law  3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3502  Introduction to Courts  3 None
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
DSC 3013 Terrorism & Homeland Security 3 None
DSC 3594 Introduction to Intelligence Analysis 3 None

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the Criminology degree allow for electives outside the major.  Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies.  Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement a Criminology degree: Biology, Political Science, Psychology, History, Sociology or Spanish and Latin American Studies.

 


 


Criminology, BA+MA Accelerated Program

Qualified undergraduate criminology majors who want to pursue a master’s degree in Criminal Justice may apply to participate in an accelerated program. The BA+MA program allows undergraduates to take up to 12 graduate level credits that will count toward their BA in Criminology and a MA in Criminal Justice.

Qualifications for Admission to the BA+MA

  • 72 undergraduate credits that include 12 upper-level Criminology credits
  • Overall GPA of 3.33 or higher
  • Upper-level GPA of 3.5 or higher in the Criminology major
  • Endorsement of the BA+MA Admissions Committee

Qualifications for Progressing from the BA to the MA

  • Students must obtain a minimum grade of “B” (3.00) in each graduate course that will also count toward the undergraduate degree.
  • Upon satisfactory completion of all requirements for the undergraduate degree, students will be automatically admitted into the graduate program with up to 12 elective graduate elective credits already accomplished.
  • The BA+MA program is unique to USFSM; therefore, undergraduates in the program will be restricted to USFSM course sections and will require a permit to enroll for graduate credit.
  • Undergraduate students in the BA+MA program will pay the graduate per-credit rate for any graduate courses they take.

Application Process

  1. Students may apply to the accelerated BA+MA program after they have completed 12 upper-level credits of their BA degree requirements, but before they have fewer than 12 elective credits (4 courses) remaining.
  2. Before applying to the accelerated BA+MA program, students should confer with the criminology program coordinator, their academic advisor, and the financial aid officer if appropriate.
  3. If encouraged to apply, student should submit an electronic USFSM graduate application. And then proceed to submit the other required documents:
  • A sealed official undergraduate transcript(s);
  • Two letters of recommendation, addressing issues relating to past academic performance or work experience
  • A 1-2 page Statement of Purpose, indicating your reasons for seeking a master’s degree in Criminal Justice and the particular areas of criminology or criminal justice that interest you.

Send the required documents to:

USF Sarasota-Manatee
Office of Admissions
8350 N. Tamiami Trail, C107
Sarasota, FL 34243

Students will be charged graduate tuition for a full-time course load when taking graduate courses while working toward their BA.

 


 


Interdisciplinary Social Sciences

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 45.0101
Major Code ISS
Department Code IDS
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/interdisciplinary-social-sciences/

The B.A. degree in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (ISS) is designed to provide an interdisciplinary integration of the social sciences for students who are interested in a holistic educational experience. ISS students design a program of study according to their interest by selecting a concentration in Applied Aging and Wellbeing; Crime, Law, and Justice; Environmental Studies; Governmental and Global Affairs; or Social Relations and Policy in addition to their core ISS coursework.  ISS students complete an internship course intended to provide work experience in their chosen concentration as well as an opportunity to apply the program’s emphasis on critical thinking and real-world problem solving.

Mission

The curriculum for the ISS degree at USFSM educates students in research methodology and statistics, critical observation, analysis of society, awareness of diversity, and the creative synthesis of disciplinary knowledge to address current social issues.  It encourages students to integrate diverse perspectives and develop the type of comprehensive understanding necessary to deal with the complexity of real-world problems.  In doing so, the ISS program aims to foster critical thinking skills that can be applied across countless job contexts, which are in demand by employers from a diverse range of occupations.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate understanding of the principles, methods, and theories informing an interdisciplinary analysis of the social sciences.
  2. Demonstrate conversance with the important principles, methods, and theories of at least two social science disciplines.
  3. Analyze, synthesize, and evaluate research from at least two social science disciplines.
  4. Demonstrate appropriate techniques of analysis, qualitative, and/or quantitative, by synthesizing and evaluating published research and making recommendations for future research.
  5. Develop an effective written research paper.

Policies

Students majoring in ISS must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CLASS.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

There are no State-Mandated Common Prerequisites for the ISS degree program.

Program of Study

A minimum of 36 semester hours is required of all undergraduate majors in ISS, although students may elect to take more.

  • Students must declare one (1) area of concentration when they declare the ISS major.
  • The ISS core courses are sequenced and must be spread over a minimum of four (4) terms; therefore students should begin taking core courses in the first semester of upper-level work.
  • While students are required to take a minimum of fifteen (15) credit hours in their concentration, they may elect to take more.
  • A minimum of 30 hours in the ISS major must be the 3000 or above level.
  • All transfer courses must be approved for use in ISS.  No transfer courses with grades below C are acceptable for credit in the ISS major.

Degree Core (15 credits, should be taken at USFSM)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISS 3311 Applied Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 PR: STA 2023 Should be taken in the first semester of the major
ISS 3010 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 None Should be taken in the first semester of the major
ISS 3300 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3 PR: ISS 3010 with a grade of “C” or better; CP: ISS 3311 with a grade of “C” or better
ISS 3937 Interdisciplinary Inquiry 3 PR: ISS 3300
ISS 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar in ISS 3 PR: ISS 3937 6ACM, SMCC

Theoretical Foundations Requirements (6 credits)

Take two (2) of the following courses:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 PR: LDR 2010 or 3331 with a minimum grade of C-. For USFSM students, LDR 3003 can serve as equivalent to LDR 2010. See Advisor.
POT 3003 Introduction to Political Theory 3 None
SYA 3110 Classical Theory 3 PR: SYG 2000; CI

Concentrations (15 credits)

Take five (5) courses from one concentration below.  A maximum of three (3) courses may be taken from a single department.

 

Environmental Studies (EVS) 

The concentration in Environmental Studies provides students with a greater understanding of environmental conditions as well as the policies that are both causes and effects of current environmental realities.

Course
Number
Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None SMCD
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
INR 3011 Globalization 3 None
INR 3038 International Wealth and Power 3 None SMLE
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 Junior Standing
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval

 

Government & Global Affairs (GGA)

The concentration in Government & Global Affairs explores the philosophical, institutional, administrative, and behavioral forces that shape global, national, state, and local governments and politics.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary
Era
3 None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 None
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 None
CPO 4034 Politics of the Developing Areas 3 None Topic:  Latin America
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 3703 International Economics 3 PR: ECO 2013, ECO 2023
INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 3 None
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
INR 4083 Conflict in the World 3 Junior or Senior Standing
INR 4403 International Law 3 None
INR 4931 Selected Topics 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 2041 American National Government 3 None SMSS
POS 2080 The American Political Tradition 3 None SMSS
POS 3182 Florida Politics and Government 3 None
POS 3078 Veterans’ Reintegration and Resilience 3 None SMCD
POS 3931 Selected Topics 3 None
POS 4624 Constitutional Law II 3 PR: POS 2041
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 None
POS 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
REL 2300 Introduction to World Religions 3 None  SMSS
REL 3613 Modern Judaism 3 None
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI

 

Crime, Law, & Justice (CLJ)

The concentration in Crime, Law, & Justice encourages a global perspective in an analysis of the interrelationships among the social, political, and psychological factors that contribute to our understanding of criminal behavior, social justice, and the legal system.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary Era 3 None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 None
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 None
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3110 Substantive Criminal Law 3 PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3502 Introduction to Courts 3 None
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
EUH 3412 The Roman Republic 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
INR 4403 International Law 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
POS 4624 Constitutional Law II 3 PR: POS 2041
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 None
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 None
REL 4171 Contemporary Christian Ethics 3 Junior Standing or CI  SMLE
SOP 4751 Psychology Applied to Law 3 PR: PSY 3213
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Applied Aging & Wellbeing (AAW)

The Applied Aging & Wellbeing concentration is designed to provide students with a holistic understanding of issues related to health and wellbeing across the life course, with particular attention to our aging population.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ANT 4462 Health, Illness, and Culture 3 PR: ANT 2410; CI
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3 None SMSS
DEP 4053 Developmental Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
EDF 3802 The Dynamics of Unity 3 None SMLE
EXP 4304 Motivation 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
EXP 4680C Cognitive Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
GEY 3323 Community Resources for the Older Adult 3 None  SMCD
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4360 Counseling for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None
GEY 4641 Death and Dying 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
GEY 4692 Professional Development and Engagement in Aging 3 PR: GEY 3601, GEY 3625, GEY 4612 6ACM, SMCC
GEY 4900 Directed Readings in Aging 1-3 CI
GEY 4917 Directed Research in Aging 1-4 CI
GEY 4935 Special Topics in Gerontology 3 None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 None
PSB 4004C Physiological Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
SOP 4777 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3024, STA 2122 and a General Biology course
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Social Relations & Policy (SRP)

The concentration in Social Relations & Policy provides an examination of the causes and consequences of human behavior, relations among groups, and social policy, with particular attention to issues related to human diversity.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 None
AMH 3572 African American History since 1865 3 None
ANT 4302 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 3 PR: an anthropology course or a women’s studies class
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
ECP 3203 Labor Economics 3 PR: ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with a grade of “C” or better SMLE
EDF 3802 The Dynamics of Unity 3 None SMLE
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 None
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 None SMLE
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 None  SMLE
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 ISS 3300 For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 Junior Standing
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 None  SMLE
POS 3078 Veterans’ Reintegration and Resilience 3 None SMCD
POS 4693 Women and Law I 3 PR: None
REL 4215 Ancient Israel and the Development of the Hebrew Bible 3 None
REL 4291 Women and the Bible 3 None
SOP 4004 Social Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; CI
SOP 4777 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3024, STA 2122 and a General Biology course
SOW 3101 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I 3 None
SOW 3102 Human Behavior and the Social Environment II 3 PR: SOW 3101, SOW 4341, SOW 4522
SOW 3203 Introduction to Social Work 3 None
SOW 3210 The American Social Welfare System 3 None
SOW 4522 Multicultural America in a Global Society 3 None
SSE 4380 Global and Multicultural Perspectives in Education 3 PR: EDG 3604, EDG 4620 SMCD
SYA 4910 Individual Research 3 CI
SYA 4930 Topics in Sociology 3 None For concentration credit with ISS Coordinator approval
SYD 3700 Racial and Ethnic Relations 3 None
SYD 4410 Urban Sociology 3 None
SYD 4601 Community Building and Social Change 3 None SMCD
SYD 4800 Gender and Society 3 PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010
SYG 3235 Latina/Latino Lives 3 PR: SYG 2000 or SYG 2010 SMCD
SYO 3120 Sociology of Families 3 None
SYP 3060 Sociology of Sexualities 3 None
SYP 3562 Family Violence 3 None

 

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the ISS degree allow for electives outside the major.  Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies by showing an area of expertise in addition to their ISS concentration. Students may elect to pursue any of the following minors that is not included in their ISS concentration:  Biology, Criminology, English Literature, Business and Technical Writing, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Leadership Studies, or Spanish and Latin American Studies.


 



 


Criminology

The minor in Criminology (CCJM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
The following two (2) required courses (6 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 None
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 PR: CCJ 3024
Any four additional courses with the following prefixes: CCJ, CJC, CJE, CJL, CJT at least 12

 


 


Economics

All students, regardless of college, can earn a minor in Economics (ECOM) by satisfactorily completing 15 credit hours in Economics: two principle courses and three upper-division courses of the student’s choosing.  It is possible to complete the minor entirely online; the principle courses will be offered both online and in a traditional face-to-face setting.

Required Courses (6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 None SMSS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 None SMSS

Electives (9 credit hours)

Choose any three additional courses from the list below:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ECO xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
ECP xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
ECS xxxx Upper Division Economics 3-9 Vary by course
  • Students may select any 3000-level or above course with an ECO, ECP, or ECS heading for the minor, so long as the total number of upper-division hours is 9.

 


Environmental Science and Policy

The minor in Environmental Science and Policy (ESPM) consists of the following six (6) courses (18 credit hours).

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None  SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None  SMCD

 


Gerontology

The minor in Gerontology (GEYM) consists of a minimum of five (5) courses (15 credit hours).  The following three (3) required courses (9 credit hours) plus two additional GEY courses at the upper level (6 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None

 


Political Science

A minor in Political Science (POLM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
Any two (2) of the following courses (6 credit hours) plus any four (4) upper-level courses with the following prefixes: CPO, POS, POT, INR (at least 12 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 None
INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations 3 None
POS 2041 American National Government 3 None SMSS
POT 3003 Introduction to Political Theory 3 None

 


 


Sociology

A minor in Sociology (SOCM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).
The following two (2) required courses (6 credit hours) plus any four (4) upper-level Sociology courses with the following prefixes: SYA, SYD, SYG, SYO, SYP (at least 12 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 None  SMSS
SYA 3110 Classical Theory 3 PR: SYG 2000; CI

 



 


Environmental Science and Policy

The Certificate in Environmental Science and Policy (ESP) is designed for individuals working in fields such as education, government, law, and urban planning who seek a greater understanding of environmental conditions as well as the policies that are both causes and effects of current environmental realities.

Policies

  • Students can pursue a certificate in Environmental Science and Policy while pursuing another degree or as a non-degree-seeking student.
  • Non-degree students must have a high school diploma or equivalent.
  • Students wishing to apply for the ESP Certificate should contact their academic advisor.
  • Students must earn a B (not B-) in each course taken for the certificate.

Program of Study

A certificate in Environmental Science and Policy consists of six (6) courses (18 credit hours).

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 None  SMNS
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 None
PHI 3640 Environmental Ethics 3 None
POS 3697 Environmental Law 3 None
PUP 4203 Environmental Politics and Policy 3 None
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 None  SMCD

 


School of Education

Location:
Telephone: 941-359-4531
Website: usfsm.edu/school-of-education/
Advising: Student Services
SMC C107
941-359-4330

As an institution accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee (USFSM) meets the highest standards of professional educator preparation in the United States of America. The Continuous Improvement Commission of the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) granted USFSM NCATE accreditation for both its initial and advanced educator preparation programs. Accreditation affirms we meet the rigorous standards of the professional education community. Our programs have been examined by the best in the field and have passed this test of excellence. NCATE’s performance-based accreditation system for educator preparation ensures that education candidates are prepared to make a difference in P-12 student learning. Providers accredited under NCATE standards are now served by the single specialized accreditation system for educator preparation in the United States, the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP). More than 900 educator preparation providers participate in the CAEP accreditation system.

Vision

The vision of the School of Education (SOE) is to lead in transforming the educational endeavors of our region and to be recognized nationally for excellence in our work. We admit applicants who are highly qualified, developed in their abilities to ensure that all pupils learn, committed to continuous improvement of their own praxis, and prepared to assume leadership roles in the school settings in which they will work.

Mission

The School of Education’s (SOE) mission is to prepare effective educators who will learn, lead, inspire, and transform their schools and communities through critical and imaginative literacies. We see the process of learn, lead, inspire and transform as recursive and not linear. Our mission guides the SOE to prepare educators poised to positively engage in and positively impact individuals and their communities, locally, nationally, and globally. We meet our mission through programs grounded in researched-based practices, critical perspectives, and clinical experiences.   Our school and community partnerships form a solid basis for program assessment and continuous improvement.

Goals

Goal areas of the SOE are in Content Knowledge, Reflective and Ethical Practice, Evaluation and Decision-making, Educational Design, and Learner as an Individual in Community.  Faculty, students, staff and members of our community developed the seven candidate proficiencies expected of each of our graduates, which are:

  1. Content Knowledge
    • Candidates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge for their respective roles.
  2. Reflective and Ethical Practice
    • Candidates engage in reflective and ethical practice as educators.
  3. Evaluation and Decision-making
    • Candidates make professional educational decisions drawing on analysis of data and research from a variety of sources
  4. Educational Design
    • Candidates design educational experiences that result in successful learning.
    • Candidates demonstrate proficiency in educational technology aligned to the NETS-T standards.
  5. Learner as an Individual in the Community
    • Candidates construct learning environments that reflect the diversity of experiences, perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world.
    • Candidates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and sensitivity to diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students

There are additional specific program proficiencies for candidates seeking state certification delineated by the Florida Department of Education.


 



 


Admission Requirements

The Bachelor’s in Elementary Education degree program is a limited access program.  The SOE may accept professional education and specialization coursework completed at USFSM or at other accredited institutions as follows:

  1. Courses completed within the last five (5) years may be accepted.
  2. Courses completed over five (5) years but less than ten (10) years ago must have the approval of the Director from the School.
  3. Courses completed ten (10) years ago or longer will count as elective credit only.

Admission to the Bachelor’s in Elementary Education degree is contingent upon meeting the following preliminary requirements:

  1. Completion of a SOE application form.  The admission process to the SOE is separate and in addition to admission to USFSM. Education majors must meet with an academic advisor to apply for admission into the School. During the New Student Orientation, students receive information about their degree program and register for courses for their first semester.
  2. Completion of General Education requirements.
  3. Passing scores on a general knowledge exam specified for the major:
    1. For the major in Elementary Education, which leads to certification to teach in Florida, submission of passing scores on all portions of the General Knowledge Test of the Florida Teacher Certification Exams, within 10 years of application for certification. GRE test administrations conducted on or after July 1, 2015, may be used as an acceptable means of demonstrating a mastery of general knowledge. Passing scores must be in accordance with Rule 6A-4.0021 (12) FAC.
    2. For the major in Interdisciplinary Education, which does not lead to state certification, EITHER submission of passing scores on all portions of the General Knowledge Test of Florida Teacher Certification Exams OR all portions of the Praxis Core Academic Skills for Educators exam.
  4. An overall minimum GPA of 2.50 on all attempted hours.
  5. Completion of State-Mandated Common Prerequisites.

International Students

The program requires field experience or clinical experiences.  You will need to obtain a Social Security Number (SSN) in order to complete the requirements for several courses. Obtaining the SSN is the responsibility of the student.


 


Graduation Requirements

To graduate with a Bachelor’s degree from the School of Education, candidates must meet all General Requirements and Graduation Requirements of CLASS majors as well as the following:

  1. Earned a combined grade point average of 2.50 in professional education and specialization as well as an overall USFSM GPA of 2.50
  2. Completed all assignments and/or requirements that are required to be uploaded into Taskstream
  3. Successful completion of all courses and requirements on the Program of Study
  4. Submitted all documents for graduation (i.e., test scores, final grades, final transcripts) to Academic Advising (SMC-C107) no later than 5:00 pm on the Friday after the graduation ceremony. If that date is a university holiday, then the said information must be submitted no later than 5:00 pm on the Thursday after the graduation ceremony.

Elementary Education majors must also have:

  1. Successfully completed all program requirements for ESOL including the ESOL Field Experience Documentation form.
  2. Passed the appropriate Florida Teacher Certification Examinations (FTCE): Subject Area Exams and Professional Education Exam.
  3. Elementary Education majors must also complete the assignments and/or requirements that are required to be uploaded into Taskstream.

 


 


Students of Concern Policies and Processes

The SOE is responsible for ensuring that its students (hereinafter referred to as “candidates”) exhibit the knowledge, skills and dispositions outlined in the conceptual framework, institutional, state, and national standards, including a commitment to fairness and the belief that all students can learn. Further, as educators our candidates must exhibit the highest ethical standards in their role as moral exemplars in the community.

There are occasionally patterns of observed behaviors that could give rise to a concern that a candidate’s dispositions and professional deportment are not sufficiently developed or are even inconsistent with those expected of a professional educator. Both the SOE administration and the candidate will be made aware of concerns that a candidate is not meeting the standard of knowledge, skills, or dispositions that are expected by the college and specifically outlined in institutional, state, or national standards. This awareness will be communicated in a manner that is sufficiently formative and allows the candidate to reflect, consider alternatives, and attempt to make any changes necessary consistent with fulfilling their professional career aspirations. The process should be sensitive, transparent, and effective.

There are provisions so that the faculty and supervisors who work with the candidate in subsequent semesters are aware of the concerns and the plans developed to address those concerns. There will always be more than one representative of the faculty who agrees that the concerns warrant intervention. This shall be an internal process managed by a small committee of faculty, referred to as the Pre-completion Educator Professional Support Committee (PEPSC). The knowledge, skills, and/or dispositions of concern and plans of action are documented in the committee’s files, but do not ordinarily become part of the candidate’s academic file. This process in the SOE is complementary to processes already in place in the university (such as those in student affairs, academic probation, etc.) and will focus on the professional preparation of the candidate.


 


Taskstream

Taskstream accounts are required of students enrolled in the following School of Education (SOE) degree programs:

  • Bachelor in Elementary Education
  • Master of Teaching Elementary Education
  • Master of Education in Educational Leadership (all concentrations).

Taskstream is a web-based electronic data system that provides assessment data to faculty and candidates in order to evaluate progress against professional standards for teachers and leaders in education.  These data support approval by the Florida Department of Education and the Council for Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP).  Faculty use data from the assessments for continuous program improvement.

Accounts should be purchased once the candidate is in a course with a Critical Task (formative or summative, or a Transition Point Project).  Formative Tasks (FT) help candidates and faculty monitor progress and identify areas in need of growth; there is no required minimum mean score for FTs, but candidates must upload the Formative Task to Taskstream or earn an Incomplete for the course.  Summative Tasks (SCT) evaluate mastery of required knowledge, skills, and/or dispositions and candidates must earn a mean score of 3 or higher on a 5-point scale, or a 2.0 or higher on a 4-point scale to pass the course.

In addition to assessments, there might also be forms to complete and upload into Taskstream.  Information on how to get and use a Taskstream account is available in the program orientation on Canvas.

 


 



 


Elementary Education

Degree Type: B.A., B.S.
CIP Code 13.1202
Major Code BEE
Department Code EDE
Degree Website www.usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/elementary-education/

The School of Education (SOE) has the responsibility for the development and supervision of programs leading to the Bachelor of Science Degree or Bachelor of Arts Degree in Elementary Education K-6.

Please be advised that program and/or course requirements are subject to change, per state legislative mandates, Florida State Department of Education program approval standards, and accreditation criteria.

Elementary Education majors will be assigned to a specified sequence of courses to be followed throughout the program enrollment. Coursework will include clinical requirements and field experiences. Candidates who withdraw from or who have unsatisfactory grades during a field experience or internships clinical requirement may be terminated from the program.

Part-time students in Elementary Education (those planning to take 9 credit hours or less per semester) must meet program and clinical requirements associated with the programs. These requirements include being available to participate in the clinical requirement during the regular school hours of operation.

Candidates who successfully complete this state-approved program will be eligible for certification in Elementary Education (K-6/ESOL). The current program of study includes both coursework and extensive clinical experience in elementary school settings to enable candidates to integrate theory with teaching practice.  All elementary education candidates are required to demonstrate the Florida Educator Accomplished Practices (FEAPs) through core assignments in courses and clinical requirements.

The School of Education offers a full ESOL Endorsement for all Elementary Education major graduates.  There are special requirements for ESOL endorsement infused in coursework. Candidates must successfully complete the following:

  1. Three (3) courses with specific focus in instruction for English Language Learners (TSL 4240, TSL 4344, and TSL 4349), with a minimum score of ‘Satisfactory’ or meets standard on all summative Critical Tasks and tests.
  2. Final ESOL documentation including the Field Experience documentation providing evidence of satisfactory demonstration of the Florida Teacher Standards for ESOL Endorsement, 2010.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Content Knowledge
    • Elementary Education candidates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge and content pedagogical knowledge across subject areas.
  2. Reflective and Ethical Practice
    • Elementary Education candidates demonstrate self-reflection, professional growth, and ethical practice.
  3. Evaluation and Decision Making
    • Elementary Education candidates use research-based practices and data to make instructional decisions.
  4. Educational Design
    • Elementary Education candidates design educational experiences that result in positive impact on student academic achievement.
    • Elementary Education candidates are proficient in integrating technology to enhance academic achievement.
  5. Learner as an Individual in the Community
    • Elementary Education candidates enhance learning environments to meet needs of the diverse experiences, perspectives, and cultures of their students.
    • Elementary Education candidates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and sensitivity to diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

These prerequisites must be met by all USFSM students with a grade of “C-” as the minimum acceptable grade.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Number Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
EDF X005 EDF 2005 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3

Degree Requirements

LOWER-LEVEL CURRICULUM

Required:

  • General Education Curriculum – 36 credit (exempt for transfers with completed General Education)
  • USFSM Foundation Sequence – 3 credits (exempt for transfers with 60 credits)
  • Education Prerequisite – 3 credits
    • EDF 2005 Introduction to Teaching Profession
  • For BA degree: Foreign language requirement (0-2 courses/0-8 credits)
    • Satisfactory completing SPN 1121 or tested competency at that level
    • Satisfactory completing ASL 2150 or tested competency at that level

Recommended:

  • International or Diversity Courses (can be taken within General Education)
  • Arts Appreciation Courses (can be taken within General Education)

ADMITTANCE to the BACHELOR in ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM.

The program is designed to start upper level courses in summer semester for a spring graduation in senior year.

 

UPPER-LEVEL COURSES

Block One Courses

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
RED 4333 Content Area Reading 3  

May take prior to GKT

EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 Junior or Senior Standing SMCD; may take prior to GKT
EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 PR: General Psychology; School of Education majors only
EDE 4223 Creative Experiences for the Child 3 School of Education majors only
EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240
RED 4310 Reading and Learning to Read 3 School of Education majors only
TSL 4240 Applied Linguistics in Teaching Diverse Students 3 School of Education majors only

Block Two Courses

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EEX 4084 Instruction for Exceptional and Diverse Students 3 PR: EDE 4223; CR: EDE 4947 School of Education major only
EDE 4947 Clinical Education I 3 PR: EDF 3122, TSL 4240; CR: EEX 4084 Must apply for and be approved by Coordinator of Clinical Education
SCE 4310 Teaching Elementary School Science 3 School of Education majors only; Admission to School of Education and completion of General Distribution Requirements in the Natural Science area
SSE 4313 Teaching Elementary (K-6) Social Studies 3 School of Education majors only; CI
MAE 4310 Teaching Elementary School (K-6) Mathematics I 3 PR: Two college level mathematics courses; School of Education majors only
RED 4511 Linking Literacy Assessment to Instruction 3 PR: RED 4310
TSL 4344 Foundations of Teaching ESOL in Mainstream Classes 3 CP: TSL 4240

Block Three Courses

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EDE 4948 Clinical Education II 6 PR: EDE 4947, EDE 4323, MAE 4310, RED 4511; CR: EDE 4302; CP: RED 4310 Must apply for and be approved by Coordinator of Clinical Education
MAE 4326 Teaching Elementary School (K-6) Mathematics II 3 PR: MAE 4310
LAE 4314 Teaching Writing in the Elementary School, Grade K-6 3 Elementary Education majors only; CI
EDE 4430 Measurement for Teachers 3 School of Education majors only
EDE 4302 The Learning Environment 3 PR: EDE 4947, RED 4310, EEX 4084, MAE 4310; CR: EDE 4948
TSL 4349 Teaching Multilingual Students 3 PR: TSL 4240; CP: TSL 4344

Block Four Courses (FINAL SEMESTER)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EDE 4949 Clinical Education III 9-12 PR: EDE 4948; DPR; S/U Must have all state tests and applicable programmatic requirements completed.  Must apply for Clinical III and be approved by the Coordinator of Clinical Education.

Clinical Education

Candidates will be required to complete field experiences and Clinical Education experiences throughout the teacher preparation program. It is the policy of the SOE that a candidate unable to complete clinical education successfully may change majors to Interdisciplinary Education.

The Clinical Education experience involves observing and teaching in a classroom. Clinical Education sites are available in the counties served by USFSM. Candidates should meet with an advisor to discuss eligibility for Clinical Education I and II internships.

Special requirements to qualify for enrollment in Clinical Education III:

  1. Admission to the SOE.
  2. Completion of General Education, State Communication and Computation Requirements (formerly known as Gordon Rule), and all other program prerequisites.
  3. Passing scores on all sections of the General Knowledge Test or GRE.
  4. Completion of fingerprinting and background check as required by the school district in which the student is placed.
  5. Successful completion of Clinical Education I and II.
  6. Completion of an application for Clinical Education III.
  7. Completion of all professional education and specialization coursework, including the ESOL documentation.
  8. A combined grade point average of 2.50 in professional education and specialization coursework as well as an overall USF GPA of 2.50.
  9. A minimum “C-” grade or “S” in required major courses.
  10. Passing scores on all sections of the FTCE exams. Evidence of passing scores is due by the date established by the Coordinator of Clinical Education, normally 45 days prior to the end of the semester prior to Clinical Education III.

 


Interdisciplinary Education

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 13.1202
Major Code IED
Department Code EDR
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-liberal-arts-and-social-sciences/school-of-education/

The Interdisciplinary Education degree leads to a Bachelor of Arts designed for those not seeking positions as classroom teachers, which would require certification through the Elementary Education degree.  The Interdisciplinary Education degree shares common courses with the Elementary Education degree; therefore, it is possible to transfer from Elementary Education into Interdisciplinary Education without losing time toward completion.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Content Knowledge
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates demonstrate depth and breadth of content knowledge for their roles.
  2. Reflective and Ethical Practice
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates demonstrate self-reflection, professional growth, and ethical practice.
  3. Evaluation and Decision Making
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates make professional decisions drawing on analysis of data and research from a variety of sources.
  4. Educational Design
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates design educational experiences that result in successful student learning.
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates are proficient in integrating technology to enhance learning.
  5. Learner as an Individual in the Community
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates enhance learning environments to meet needs of the diverse experiences, perspectives, and cultures of their students and the larger world.
    • Interdisciplinary Education graduates communicate in ways that demonstrate fairness, respect, and sensitivity to diversity, setting high academic expectations for all students.

Prerequisites

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

These prerequisites must be met by all USFSM students with a grade of “C-” as the minimum acceptable grade.

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Number Course Number Credit Hours
EDF X005 EDF 2005 3

Degree Requirements

LOWER-LEVEL CURRICULUM – 60 credits

Required:

  • General Education Curriculum – 36 credit (exempt for transfers with completed Gen. Ed.)
  • USFSM Foundation Sequence – 3 credits (exempt for transfers with 60 credits)
  • Education Prerequisite – 3 credits
    • EDF 2005 Introduction to Teaching Profession

Foreign Language Requirement: (0-2 courses / 0-8 credits)

  • Satisfactory completion of SPN 1121 or tested competency at that level
  • Satisfactory completion of ASL 2150C or tested competency at that level

 Recommended:

  • International or Diversity Courses – 3 credits (can be taken within Gen Ed)
  • An additional Humanities Course– 3 credits (can satisfy Gen Ed elective)

 Totals at least 42 credits

Electives may be lower or upper level

 

ADMITTANCE to the BACHELOR in EDUCATION PROGRAM

The program is designed to start upper-level courses in summer semester for a spring graduation in senior year

UPPER-LEVEL CURRICULUM– 60 credits

Required Courses (9 courses / 27 credits)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EDE 4223 Creative Experiences for the Child 3 School of Education Majors only
EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 Junior or Senior Standing SMCD
EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 PR: General Psychology School of Education Majors only
RED 4310 Reading and Learning to Read 3 School of Education Majors only
TSL 4240 Applied Linguistics in Teaching Diverse Students 3 School of Education Majors only
EEX 4084 Instruction for Exceptional and Diverse Students 3 PR: EDE 4223; CR: EDE 4947 School of Education Majors only
RED 4333 Content Area Reading 3 None
EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240
EDE 4947 Clinical Education I 3 PR: EDF 3122, TSL 4240 both with a grade of “C-” or better; CR: EEX 4084 Must apply for and be approved by Coordinator of Clinical Education application process)

Interdisciplinary Concentration (3 upper-level courses + lower prerequisite if needed)

Select one concentration area (9-12 credits):

Concentration Code Prerequisites Requirements
English ELG LIT 2000 (3 credits) AML 3xxx (3 credits)
ENL 3xxx (3 credits)
discipline elective (3 credits)
Gerontology GTY GEY 3601 (3 credits)
GEY 3625 (3 credits)
GEY 4612 (3 credits)
History HIS AMH 2xxx (3 credits) discipline electives (9 credits)
Political Science PLT POT 2041 (3 credits) POT 3003 (3 credits)
discipline electives (6 credits)
Professional & Technical Communication PFT ENC 1102 (3 credits) ENC 3250
discipline electives (6 credits)
Psychology PCY PSY 2012 (3 credits) PSY 3213 (3 credits)
discipline electives (6 credits)
Sociology SCY SYG 2000 (3 credits) SYA 3110
discipline electives (6 credits)
Criminology CMY CCJ 3024 (3 credits)
CCJ 3117 (3 credits)
discipline elective (3 credits)
Leadership LDR LDR 3003 (3 credits)
discipline electives (6 credits)
Education EDN any upper-level education courses (9 credits)


Electives
(2 courses / 6 credits)

  • Any 2 upper-level courses from the Education curriculum or the chosen concentration

Pillars Requirements

  • Ethics and Leadership Pillars Course (1 course)
  • Diversity and Community Engagement course (1 course)(satisfied by EDF 3604 Schools and Society)
  • Communication and Critical Thinking Pillars Course (1 course)(satisfied by EDG 4909 Directed Studies: Capstone)

Capstone Course for Interdisciplinary Education (1 course / 3 credits)

  • EDG 4909 Directed Studies
    As the capstone this course, while taught individually, follows a common syllabus focused on demonstration of degree competencies.

The upper-level curriculum provides 51 upper-level credits and less than 60 required credits after admittance.

If additional credits are needed to reach 120, they may be open electives: any level, any subject.


 



 


Education

This minor in Education (EDUM) is approved by the Florida Department of Education to provide professional preparation according to Rule 6A-5.066, F.A.C., for those who seek an approved alternative route to Florida Certification.  The minor builds understanding of learners and learning for those earning a baccalaureate degree in a discipline other than education. The program complements discipline expertise by building knowledge and skills of effective teaching. The minor provides rigorous instruction in creating a safe learning environment in P-12 classrooms, effective instructional planning and teaching strategies for diverse learners, and using assessment data to inform instruction with field experiences incorporated into coursework. The course work will build understanding of learning and learners in the prekindergarten- grade 12 environment. Thus, participants in this minor will develop understanding and skill in how to teach their discipline. The minor does need to be declared. A student wishing to receive a minor in Education should complete the course requirements described under “Required Courses.”  Successful completion of the Minor in Education results in the following endorsement on the student’s transcript: “Completed State-Approved Professional Training Option.”

Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of effective management of the learning environment such that the environment is safe and that student learning is demonstrated
  2. Candidates apply knowledge of human development and learning to prepare effective learning environments and provide effective instruction for diverse student populations
  3. Candidates demonstrate accurate use of multiple sources of data to inform planning and instruction to improve student achievement
  4. Candidates demonstrate effective instructional strategies for diverse learners, including students with disabilities
  5. Candidates effectively apply research-based instructional practices of reading to instruction in their discipline
  6. Candidates demonstrate effective instruction for teaching English Language Learners

Required Courses

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ESE 4322 Classroom Management for a Diverse School & Society 3 None Learning Outcome 1

Subsequent credit for ESE 5433 is not permitted.

EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 PR: General psychology; Education majors or minors only Learning Outcome 2
EDF 4430 Measurement for Teachers 3 Education majors or minors only Learning Outcome 3; See advisor to waive prerequisites
EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240 Learning Outcome 4; See advisor to waive prerequisites
RED 4333 Content Area Reading 3 None Learning Outcome 5
TSL 4344 Foundations of Teaching ESOL in Mainstream Classroom 3 CP: TSL 4240 Learning Outcome 6

TSL 4240 can be taken as a prerequisite or corequisite

 

 


 



 


Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Teacher Preparation

This post-baccalaureate certificate program (EDUM) is approved by the Florida Department of Education to provide professional preparation according to Rule 6A-5.066, F.A.C., for those who seek an approved alternative route to Florida Certification.  Individuals who hold a baccalaureate degree from an accredited or approved institution who are pursing professional teaching certification from FLDOE are eligible. The certificate program provides rigorous instruction in creating a safe learning environment in P-12 classrooms, effective instructional planning and strategies for teaching diverse learners including those with disabilities, applying research-based instructional practices to reading in disciplines, instruction of English Language Learners, and using assessment data to inform instruction.  Successful completion of this certificate results in the following endorsement on the student transcript: “Completed State-Approved Professional Training Option.”

Those electing the graduate level course work may apply some coursework as appropriate to one of the following degree programs: Master’s in Teaching, Master’s in Education, Master’s in Educational Leadership. Additional requirements must be met to be eligible for admission into these graduate degree programs. Please speak to an advisor for more information.

Mission

The School of Education’s mission is the mission for this certificate program: to prepare effective educators who will learn, lead, inspire, and transform their schools and communities.

There is a need in our community for educators in content specific areas, particularly in math and science for middle and high school. Students with a bachelor’s degree in a content area, who have a Statement of Eligibility or Temporary Teaching Certificate from FLDOE need specific coursework to meet the requirements specified in 6A-4.006, General and Professional Preparation in order to pursue a Professional Teaching Certificate. The Florida Department of Education forecasts a continuing need of teachers in all areas.

Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes

  1. Candidates demonstrate knowledge of effective management of the learning environment such that the environment is safe and that student learning is demonstrated.
  2. Candidates apply knowledge of human development and learning to prepare effective learning environments and provide effective instruction for diverse student populations.
  3. Candidates demonstrate accurate use of multiple sources of data to inform planning and instruction to improve student achievement.
  4. Candidates demonstrate effective instructional strategies for diverse learners, including students with disabilities.
  5. Candidates effectively apply research-based instructional practices of reading to instruction in their discipline.
  6. Candidates demonstrate effective instruction for teaching English Language Learners.

Admission Requirements

  • Applicants must meet University requirements (see Undergraduate or Graduate Admissions) as well as requirements below.
  • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent from a regionally accredited university, and have earned a “C” or a 2.50 on a 4.00 scale average or higher in all work attempted cumulatively or as an upper division student, or
  • A graduate degree from a regionally accredited institution with at least a 2.50 GPA for the preceding baccalaureate, or a 2.50 GPA for the graduate degree.
  • Applicants must have a Statement of Status of Eligibility.
  • A personal statement (500 words) that addresses the applicant’s experiences (including any prior experience working with children) and what prompted the decision to become a teacher.
  • Current resume
  • Interview, if applicable

Required Courses (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ESE 4322 Classroom Management for Diverse School and Society 3 None
OR
ESE 5344 Classroom Management for a Diverse School and Society 3 None Learning Outcome a

 

EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 PR: General psychology; School of Education Majors only Learning Outcome b; See advisor to waive prerequisites
OR
EDF 6133 Child & Adolescent Development and Learning 3  None  Learning Outcome b

 

EDF 4430 Measurement for Teachers 3 School of Education Majors only Learning Outcome c
OR
 EDF 6432 Foundations of Measurement 3  None  Learning Outcome c

 

 EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240; Learning Outcome d
OR
EDE 6326 Instructional Planning for Diverse Learners 3  None Learning Outcome d

 

RED 4333 Content Area Reading 3 Learning Outcome f
OR
RED 6544 Cognition, Comprehension, and Content Area Reading: Remediation of Reading 3 None Learning Outcome f

 

TSL 4344 Foundations of Teaching ESOL in Mainstream Classes 3 CP: TSL 4240 Learning Outcome f; See advisor to waive prerequisite
OR
TSL 5085 ESOL I – Theory and Practice of Teaching English Language Learners 3  None Learning Outcome f

 


 


College of Science & Mathematics

Location:  SMC B322
Telephone:
Website: usfsm.edu/academics/college-of-science-and-mathematics/
Advising: Student Services, SMC-C107, 941-359-4330

Mission

The College of Science and Mathematics at USF Sarasota-Manatee provides an innovative, student-centered educational environment through inquiry-based learning and collaborative research focused on basic and applied sciences and mathematics. We cultivate a dynamic culture by encouraging free discussion, fostering critical thinking, developing strong communication skills, and actively engaging students in research and evidence-based practices under the mentorship of faculty.

Goals

Our students will be well prepared for careers in diverse fields, as well as graduate or professional schools. They will have the critical skills and broad outlook that will empower them to be engaged and productive leaders in their communities.

  1. Promote an intellectual and interdisciplinary community amongst faculty and students.
  2. Initiate and expand undergraduate and graduate programs.
  3. Cultivate a vigorous research culture that incorporates student researchers under the mentorship of faculty.
  4. Practice effective pedagogy that facilitates student-centered environments and critical thinking.

 



Admission Requirements

Admission to the CSM is open to students who have been accepted to the USFSM and who declare a major in one of its disciplines. Undergraduate students must submit a formal declaration of major to the college. This occurs during orientation and advising for new students.


 


General Requirements

Unless otherwise stipulated below, students in CSM majors must meet all graduation requirements of USFSM. In addition, CSM majors must meet the following requirements of the college.

  1. Only courses earning credit at or above the minimum grade requirement are credited toward the degree.  Any course in which the grade earned is below the program requirement must be retaken; however, the original grade will still affect the GPA unless it is retaken under the grade-forgiveness allowance.
  2. Students may use only one directed-study/-research/-readings course (for a maximum of 4 credits) for elective credit in the major; additional directed-study credit may be applied to hours outside the major.  Directed-study/-research/-readings courses require a professor’s approval.
  3. No S/U credit can be applied to the major, unless S/U is the only grading option.  A maximum of twenty (20) S/U credits are allowed.  Requests for S/U grading must be approved by the professor and submitted to the dean by the end of week three of the term. All work for S/U credit is graded.
  4. Students should take all “core” courses in the major at USFSM unless they have been accepted as transfer credit upon admittance.
  5. Students are encouraged to use credits outside the major to pursue a minor that will be recorded on the transcript. In most cases, minors are composed of 5-6 courses (15-18 credit hours).
  6. The CSM will accept major coursework completed at USFSM or at other accredited institutions as follows:
    1. Courses completed in the past five (5) years are accepted.
    2. Courses completed over five (5), but less than ten (10), years ago must have approval of the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics or designee.
    3. Courses completed ten (10) years ago or longer may only be counted towards general elective credit and only with approval of the Dean of the College of Science and Mathematics or designee.

Graduation Requirements

Unless otherwise stipulated below, students in CSM majors must meet all graduation requirements of USFSM. In addition, CSM majors must meet the following requirements of the college.

  1. Unless otherwise stipulated below, students must earn at least a C (not C-) in all course requirements of the major or concentration within a major, minors and certificates.
  2. At least 50% of the major coursework must be completed at USFSM.
  3. For B.A. degrees, students must complete the Foreign Language Exit Requirement by passing or exempting the first two (2)  4 or 5-credit hour courses of a foreign language.

Minor Policies

Majors in the CSM Department of Science and Mathematics are designed to accommodate pursuit of a minor as well. Students with both a major and a minor have a competitive advantage when they graduate.
Policies
1. Students pursuing a minor must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CSM.
2. A minimum of three (3) three-credit courses or two (2) four-credit courses (8-9 credits) of the minor must be completed at USFSM.
3. Only graded credit will be counted for transfer.
4. Requests for transfer of credit must be made in writing when declaring a minor.
5. Course equivalencies need approval from the College Dean.


 



 


A.A., Pre-Engineering, Mechanical

USF Sarasota-Manatee (USFSM) and the USF College of Engineering have an articulation agreement that enables students to take their first two years toward a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering at USFSM and progress to completing the degree at USF in Tampa.  The A.A. in Pre-Mechanical Engineering (PEM) is designed to ensure students are well prepared, taking the required state mandated prerequisites and introductory courses for the major while completing the general education curriculum.

Fulltime students who follow the curriculum plan earn credit in required prerequisite courses in math, science and engineering while earning an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree at USFSM within two years.  If they meet the GPA required of all USF students to pursue the major, they are able to move seamlessly into the upper-level curriculum in the College of Engineering, completing the degree in four years.

Students must meet all USFSM Associate in Arts minimum requirements in compliance with USFSM Lower-Level Core CurriculumUSF Regulation 3.019 Associate in Arts DegreeFlorida Statute 1007.25 General Education Courses; Common Prerequisites; Other Degree Requirements , and Florida Statute 1007.262 Foreign Language Competence.  Satisfactory completion of the USFSM Pre-Mechanical Engineering A.A. guarantees admission to the USF College of Engineering. To be admitted into the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering program, students must meet the admission requirements of the program as specified in the USF Tampa Undergraduate Catalog, pertaining to the academic year they enter the 2+2 program including minimum grades identified below.

GPA and Grading Requirement

The minimum admission requirements for department of mechanical engineering include minimum overall GPA of 2.00, minimum USF GPA of 2.00, and a cumulative 3.00 GPA based on best attempt and a minimum grade of C in MAC 2311(or MAC2281), MAC 2312(or MAC 2282), PHY 2048, and PHY 2048L .  All math, science, engineering, and specialization courses required for the degree must be completed successfully within two attempts (grades of W, I, IF, U, R, and M are considered attempts).

The minimum acceptable grade in all degree required math and science courses is a C or higher (C- is insufficient). The minimum acceptable grade in engineering and specialization courses which are prerequisites to other degree required courses is a C-, excepted as stated in the Department Continuation Requirements. The passing grade for terminal engineering and specialization courses is a D-. Students must have and maintain a minimum 2.00 Math and Science GPA, 2.00 Engineering GPA, 2.00 Specialization GPA, 2.00 USF GPA, and 2.00 Overall GPA.

 

Curriculum Progression Plan
(60 credit hours)

As math, science, and engineering course offerings are limited and sequenced, it is strongly recommended that students begin this program in the fall semester.  Students who start in spring or summer may take general education, foreign language, or remedial courses as needed.

Year 1 – Fall  (12 credit hours)

Course Number  Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
ENC 1101 Composition I 3 None 6ACM, SMCO
MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 PR: MAC 1114, MAC 1140 each with a “C” or better OR MAC 1147 with a “C”  or better OR qualified test scores, see notes MAC 1147 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry may need to be taken first; PR test scores: 650 or better SAT Math score, or 29 or better ACT Math score, or 90 or better College-Level Math CPT score; SMMA minimum grade of C (not a C-)
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I  3 PR: MAC 1105 with a “C” or better and one (1) year of high school chemistry OR CHM 2023 with a grade of “C” or better, or qualified test score, see notes PR test scores: 550 SAT Quantitative score; SMNS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 CP: CHM 2045 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
SLS 1107 Foundations of University Success  1 None  SMFS

Year 1 – Spring  (14 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
EGN 3000L Foundations of Engineering Lab 1 None
ENC 1102 Composition II 3 PR: ENC 1101 6ACM, SMCO
MAC 2312 Calculus II 4 PR: MAC 2311 with a “C” or better or take MAC 2311 if needed minimum grade of C (not a C-)
General Education – Humanities 3 SMSS
General Education – Social Sciences 3 SMSS

 Year 1 – Summer

Whatever needs to be taken to have 26 satisfactorily completed credits in the first year, including all course requirements listed so far.  Students starting at a lower math level should finish MAC 2312.

Year 2 – Fall  (15 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
EGN 3615 Engineering Economics with Social and Global Implications 3 None Online USF Tampa; counts toward the upper-level technical elective requirement
MAC 2313 Calculus III 4 PR: MAC 2312 with a “C” or better or take MAC 2312 if needed minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHY 2048 General Physics I – Calculus Based 3 PR: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311  SMNS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 PR: MAC 2281 or MAC 2311; CR: PHY 2048 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHZ 2102 Problems in General Physics I 1 CR: PHY 2048
General Education – Humanities 3 SMHU

 

Year 2 – Spring  (13 credit hours)

 

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
EGN 3000 Foundations of Engineering 0 None
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 PR: MAC 2313 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHY 2049 General Physics II – Calculus Based 3 PR: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312, PHY 2048, PHY 2048L minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 PR: MAC 2282 or MAC 2312, PHY 2048, PHY 2048L; CP: PHY 2049 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
PHZ 2103 Problems in General Physics II 1 CR: PHY 2049
SLS 2122 Foundations of Professional Success 2 PR: SLS 1107 SMFS
General Education – Social Sciences 3 SMSS

 

Year 2 – Summer  (6 credit hours)

 

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
EGN 3311 Statics 3 PR: PHY 2048 Taken at USF Tampa Minimum grade of C-
EGN 3343 Thermodynamics I 3 PR: PHY 2048, PHY 2049, MAC 2283 or Mac 2313 all with a grade of “C” or better, not C- Taken at USF Tampa
 
In summer term, students begin taking engineering courses in Tampa, plus whatever is needed to complete lower-level requirement.  With successful completion of their pre-engineering A.A. Certificate and meeting the departmental grade and GPA requirements, they are transferred to USF Tampa to complete their USF degree in Mechanical Engineering.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


A.A., Pre-Nursing

USF Sarasota-Manatee (USFSM) and the USF College of Nursing have an articulation agreement that enables students to take their first two years toward a B.S. degree in Nursing in the College of Science & Mathematics at USFSM and progress to completing the degree in the USF College of Nursing.  The A.A. in Pre-Nursing (PNS) is designed to ensure students are well prepared, taking the required state mandated prerequisites and introductory courses for the major while completing the general education curriculum. During the spring semester of the second year, students will have the opportunity to interview for admission to the College of Nursing the following fall.

Fulltime students who follow the curriculum plan earn credit in required prerequisite courses while earning an Associate in Arts (A.A.) degree at USFSM within two years.  If they meet the GPA required of all USF students to pursue the nursing major, they are eligible to interview for admission into the upper-level curriculum in the College of Nursing, completing the degree in four years.

Students must meet all USFSM Associate in Arts minimum requirements in compliance with USFSM Lower-Level Core CurriculumUSF Regulation 3.019 Associate in Arts DegreeFlorida Statute 1007.25 General Education Courses; Common Prerequisites; Other Degree Requirements , and Florida Statute 1007.262 Foreign Language Competence.  Satisfactory completion of the USFSM Pre-Nursing curriculum in the first three semesters qualifies a student to interview for admission into the upper-level nursing program.  Students must meet the admission requirements of the program as specified in the USF Tampa Undergraduate Catalog, pertaining to the academic year they enter the program including minimum grades identified below.

GPA and Grading Requirement

The minimum admission requirements for entry to the College of Nursing include a minimum overall GPA of 3.20, and a minimum grade of C in state-mandated nursing prerequisites, all of which must be completed prior to entry into the College of Nursing in the fall of year three.

Curriculum Progression Plan
(60 credit hours)

It is strongly recommended that students begin this program in the fall semester.  Students who start in spring or summer may take general education, foreign language, or remedial courses as needed.

Year 1 – Fall  (13 credit hours)

Course Number  Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
ENC 1101 Composition I 3 None 6ACM, SMCO
MAC 1105 College Algebra 3 PR: MAT 1033 SMMA
PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 None SMSS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
or
SYG 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 None SMSS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
General Studies – Natural Science* 3  None SMNS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
SLS 1107 Foundations of University Success  1 None  SMFS

*Recommended: Biochemistry for Health Professionals

Year 1 – Spring  (16 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics 3 SMMA minimum grade of C (not a C-)
ENC 1102 Composition II 3 PR: ENC 1101 6ACM, SMCO
BSC 2093C Human Anatomy & Physiology I 4 PR: Biochemistry for Health Professionals minimum grade of C (not a C-)
HUN 2210 Human Nutrition 3 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3 SMSS minimum grade of C (not a C-)

Year 1 – Summer (if credits are needed to bring total to 60)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
General Elective

 

Year 2 – Fall  (16 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
MCB 2000 Microbiology 3 None SMNS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
MCB 2000L Microbiology Lab 1 None SMNS minimum grade of C (not a C-)
BSC 2094C Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 PR: BSC 2093C minimum grade of C (not a C-)
General Eduation – Elective 3 SMEL
SLS 2122 Foundations of Professional Success 2 PR: SLS 1107 SMFS
General Education – Humanities 3 SMHU

Year 2 – Spring  (14 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY) Minimum Grade Required
NUR 3125 Pathophysiology 3 PR: BSC 2093C, BSC 2094C minimum grade of C (not a C-)
NUR 3825 Intro to the Profession of Nursing 2 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
NUR 4937 Nursing Seminar (Digital Health) 3 minimum grade of C (not a C-)
General Education Elective 3 SMEL
General Education – Humanities 3 SMHU

With successfully completing the Pre-Nursing A.A. degree and meeting departmental grade and GPA requirements, students will interview in the spring semester for entry and matriculation into the College of Nursing where they will complete the B.S. in Nursing degree.

**Note: The Pre-Nursing A.A. program will no longer be accepting applicants.


 



 


Biology

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 26.0101
Major Code BIO
Department Code BIO
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/biology/

Mission

The curriculum of the Bachelor of Science degree in Biology at USF Sarasota-Manatee prepares students for careers in a broad range of scientific fields. It emphasizes critical thinking and communication using an inquiry-based curriculum that directly involves students in the scientific process. Biology majors gain essential background knowledge and skills necessary to understand the conceptual framework of molecular biology, cell biology, organismal biology, ecology, and evolution. The curriculum provides experience in undergraduate research and community engaged learning to ensure the success of our students beyond graduation. As a result, it prepares students well for admission to graduate programs and professional schools.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate knowledge in three major sub-disciplines of biology: cellular and molecular biology, organismal biology, and ecology and evolution.
  2. Demonstrate an understanding of the ways in which biology interrelates with other sciences, disciplines, and society.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to engage in the scientific process through the planning, execution, and interpretation of laboratory or field studies.
  4. Demonstrate understanding of the ethical challenges and practices in the biological sciences.
  5. Demonstrate critical thinking in both qualitative and quantitative analysis and evaluation of scientific information.
  6. Demonstrate oral and written skills in the assembly and presentation of scientific reports on biological investigations.

Policies

Students pursuing this degree must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CSM. The following policies also apply:

1. To continue in the program, students must earn at least a “C” in all course requirements and prerequisites.
2. A 2.50 GPA in the major is required for graduation.
3. A minimum of thirty (30) credit hours in the major coursework taken at USF Sarasota-Manatee.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Course Number Credit Hours
BSC X010/X010L or BSC X010C or BSC X040/X040L BSC 2010/2010L 4
BSC X011/X011L or BSC X011C or BSC X041/X041L or ZOO X010/X010L or BOT X010/X010L or BOT X013/X013L BSC 2011/2011L 4
CHM X045/X045L or CHM X045C or (CHM X040 and CHM X041) CHM 2045/2045L 4
CHM X046/X046L or CHM X046C CHM 2046/2046L 4
(CHM X210/X210L and CHM X211/X211L) or (CHM X210C and CHM X211C) or (PHY X053/X053L and PHY X054/X054L) or (PHY X048/X048L and PHY X049/X049L) CHM 2210/2210L and CHM 2211/2211L 8
MAC X311 or MAC X233 or MAC X253 or MAC X281 or MAC X241 MAC 2311 4
MAC X312 or MAC X282 or MAC X234 or STA X023 or STA X024 or STA X321 STA 2023 3

Program of Study

Biology Core Requirements (18 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ENC 3241 Scientific Writing and Presentation 3 PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102
OR
BSC 3453 Research Methods in Biology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, STA 2023

 

BSC 3848 Scientific Communication 1 To be taken as a co-requisite with first elective lab. May be repeated for credit.
BSC 4938 Biology Capstone 3 Biology Majors must have Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC
PCB 3063 General Genetics 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: CHM 2210
PHY 2053 General Physics I 3 PR: MAC 1140, MAC 1114 OR MAC 1147; CR: PHY 2053L:  Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously; may not receive credit for both the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses SMNS
PHY 2053L General Physics I Laboratory 1 CR: PHY 2053; Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously; may not receive credit for both the PHY 2053 and PHY 2048 courses
PHY 2054 General Physics II 3 PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L; CR: PHY 2054L; Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously.  May not receive credit for both the PHY 2054 and PHY 2049 courses SMNS
PHY 2054L General Physics II Laboratory 1 PR: PHY 2053, PHY 2053L; CR: PHY 2054; Must be taken concurrently with lab and, if dropped, then dropped simultaneously.  May not receive credit for both the PHY 2054 and PHY 2049 courses

Biology Electives (minimum 20 credit hours)

  • Two (2) Ecological/Organismal Biology Electives from the Ecological/Organismal Biology Electives list below (6 credits)
  • Two (2) Molecular/Cellular Biology electives from the Molecular/Cellular Biology Electives list below (6 credits)
  • Two (2) Labs connected to any two (2) Ecology/Organismal or Molecular/Cellular biology electives (2 credits)
  • Two (2) More Biology Electives (Molecular/Cellular, Ecology/Organismal, or Additional Biology) (6 credits)

Molecular/Cellular Biology Electives

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BCH 4033 Advanced Biochemistry I 3 PR: CHM 2211, BSC 2010
CHS 4411 Chemistry and Microbiology of Beer 3 PR: CHM 2045
MCB 3020 General Microbiology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
MCB 3020L General Microbiology Laboratory 1 CR: MCB 3020
MCB 4503 Virology 3 PR: MCB 3020/L or PCB 3063 or PCB 3023
PCB 3063L General Genetics Laboratory 1 CP: PCB 3063
PCB 4024 Molecular Biology of the Cell 3 PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063, MCB 3410 or CI
PCB 4026 Molecular Biology of the Gene 3 PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063, MCB 3410 or CI
PCB 4234 Principles of Immunology 3 PR: PCB 3023 or PCB 3063 or MCB 3020 AND CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 and CHM 2211
PCB 3023 Cell Biology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023, CR: CHM 2210
PCB 3023L Cell Biology Laboratory 1 PR: PCB 3023
ZOO 4694 Developmental Biology 4 PR: PCB 3023 with at least a grade of “C-“, PCB 3063 with at least a grade of “C-“, CHM 2046 with at least a grade of “C-” or Chemistry with a minimum score of 5
ZOO 4753 Human Histology & Molecular Pathology of Disease 3 PR: PCB 3023, PCB 3063, CHM2210, MAC1105 or higher level MAC or STA2023; CP: CHM 2211
ZOO 4753L Human Histology & Molecular Pathology of Disease Laboratory 1 CR: ZOO 4753

Ecological/Organismal Biology Electives

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BOT 3152C Field Botany 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher level MAC course or STA 2023
BSC 3312 Marine Biology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course, or STA 2023
BSC 4052 Conservation Biology 3 PR: PCB 3043, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, Calculus (MAC 2241/2281/2311).
BSC 4937 Seminar in Marine Biology 2 PR: BSC 3312C, CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 and CHM 2211
MCB 4202 Ecology of Infectious Diseases 3 PR: MCB 3020 or PCB 3043
MCB 4277 Insect-Borne Diseases and Global Health 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2011 SMCD
PCB 3043 Principles of Ecology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023
PCB 3043L Principles of Ecology Laboratory 1 CP: PCB 3043
PCB 3404 Medicines of the Rainforest 3 PR: CHM 2211 with a grade of C or higher, BSC 2010 with a grade of C or higher SMCD
PCB 3712 General Physiology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023
PCB 3713L General Physiology Laboratory 1 CP: PCB 3712
PCB 4674 Organic Evolution 3 PR: PCB 3063
ZOO 2303 Vertebrate Zoology 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L
ZOO 4454 Fish Biology 3 PR: ZOO 3713C or PCB 3712 or BSC 2094C or ZOO 2303; Senior standing
ZOO 4513 Animal Behavior 3 PR: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 AND CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: CHM 2211

Additional Biology Electives**

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
BOT 3850 Medical Botany 3 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
BSC 2093C Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045
BSC 2094C Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, BSC 2093C, CHM 2045
BSC 4905 Independent Study 1-3 May be taken by majors for free elective credit; S/U May be used for internship
BSC 4910 Undergraduate Research 1-4 PR: CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 or CHM 2211
BSC 4933 Selected Topics in Biology 1-4 None
CHM 4292 Introduction to Medicinal Chemistry 3 PR: CHM 2211, BCH 3023
CHM 4932 Selected Topics in Chemistry 1-3 None
PCB 3346C Field Research Experience Abroad-Costa Rica 3 PR: BSC 3453 with a grade of C or higher SMCD

 


 


Communication Sciences and Disorders

Degree Type: B.S.
CIP Code 51.0201
Major Code CSM
Department Code DEA
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/communication-sciences-and-disorders/

Speech-Language Sciences Concentration (SLS)

The B.S. in Communication Sciences & Disorders (CSD) with a concentration in Speech-Language Sciences (SLS) prepares students for employment as a Speech-Language Pathology Assistant or Audiology Assistant in educational or healthcare settings.  More importantly, it prepares students for graduate study and professional certification in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) or Audiology.  Nationwide, acceptance in SLP or Audiology graduate programs is so competitive that students need to have an undergraduate degree in SLS with a high GPA if they wish to pursue these rewarding careers.

Mission

The mission of the CSD/SLS program is to prepare the student for eventual careers in Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) or Audiology. This preparation includes the acquisition of foundational concepts of speech, language, and hearing sciences, advancement of critical thinking and communication skills, and understanding of professional conduct and scope of practice at a level appropriate for the position of SLP Assistant or Audiology Assistant.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the methods used in the evaluation of communication disorders and differences: basic human communication and swallowing processes, including their biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases. Aligned with ASHA’s KASA standards.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with treatment of communication disorders: knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including their biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases. Aligned with ASHA’s KASA standards.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of professional conduct and scope of practice.
  • Demonstrate critical thinking skills.
  • Demonstrate written communication skills by writing clear and persuasive texts that include correctly applied professional language.

Program Description

  • Twelve (12) courses (36 upper-level credit hours) are required for the SLS concentration in CSD
  • The upper-level CSD-SLS curriculum is delivered completely online. Students are responsible for having technology that meets program specifications, and for completing online orientation and advising prior to registration for classes.
  • Students must earn a C or better (not C-) in all CSD-SLS coursework or co-requisite courses taken at USFSM, and they must have an overall 2.50 GPA to graduate.
  • Transfer students who lack all degree prerequisites, may begin the program, taking needed prerequisites in the first term. Second degree seekers may treat prerequisites as graduation requirements.
  • CSD students are allowed only one upper-level grade forgiveness.
  • Students are encouraged to utilize available electives and consider a minor in an area such as Biology, Gerontology, Psychology or General Business.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
Course Course Number Credit Hours
STA XXXX STA 2023 3
BSC XXXX or APK XXXX or ANT 2511 BSC 1005, BSC 2010/L, or BSC 2011/L 3-4
PHY XXXX or CHM XXXX or PSC XXXX CHM 2045/L, PHY 2053/L or PHY 2020  3-4
PSY XXXX or CLP XXXX or DEP XXXX or EXP XXXX or SYG XXXX or SYD XXXX or SYO XXXX or SYP XXXX or FYC XXXX or FAD XXXX PSY 2012, DEP 2004, or INP 2101 3

 

Program of Study

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
SPA 3004 Introduction to Language Development and Disorders 3 Junior Standing
SPA 3011 Introduction to Speech Science 3 PR: SPA 3030, SPA 3112; Junior Standing
SPA 3030 Introduction to Hearing Science 3 Junior Standing
SPA 3101 Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech and Hearing Mechanism 3 Junior Standing
SPA 3112 Applied Phonetics in Communication Disorders 3 None
SPA 3310 Introduction to Disorders of Hearing 3 PR: SPA 3030; Junior Standing
SPA 4050 Introduction to the Clinical Process 3 PR: SPA 3004, SPA 3310 6ACM, SMCC
SPA 4104 Neuroanatomy for Speech, Language and Hearing 3 PR: SPA 3101 (highly recommended)
SPA 4510 Intro. to Clinical Methods and Counseling in CSD 3 PR: SPA 3004, SPA 3310
SPA 4321 Introduction to Audiologic Rehabilitation 3 PR: SPA 3310 with a grade of C- or better
SPA 4250 Introduction to Speech Disorders 3 PR: SPA 3101
SPA 4257 Adult Communication Disorders 3 PR: SPA 4104; Junior Standing

 


Psychology

Degree Type: B.A.
CIP Code 42.0101
Major Code PSY
Department Code PSY
Degree Website usfsm.edu/academics/programs-and-majors/undergraduate/psychology/

The Bachelor of Arts degree in Psychology involves the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Because of this focus, psychology is relevant to many other areas of study both inside and outside of the social and behavioral sciences. The undergraduate program in Psychology offers the student a well-rounded liberal arts education. In addition, the program provides excellent training for qualified students who wish to pursue graduate work in such disciplines as Clinical, Cognitive and Neural Sciences or Industrial Psychology, Education, Gerontology, Counseling, Management, Medicine, Law, and other human service programs. The undergraduate major emphasizes the breadth of psychology while allowing the student some electives to pursue in-depth a particular aspect of the field.

Mission

The curriculum for a Psychology degree from USFSM prepares graduates for the many occupations (e.g., human services, community or public relations, administration, and advertising and market research) and post-graduate degree programs open to Psychology majors. By the time our majors are ready to graduate, they are equipped with two vital skill sets. First, our majors are familiar with numerous factors influencing behavior and mental processes, and the interactions between them. These factors range from physiological processes to socio-cultural influences. Second, our majors have developed the critical thinking skills necessary for the consumption, production, and application of psychological research. These skills include writing and familiarity with how ethics apply to psychological research and practice. Our majors will have the opportunity to take a capstone course that allows them to demonstrate these competencies.

Intended Learning Outcomes

  • Knowledge and Application: Understand and apply concepts and theories in multiple areas of psychology (e.g. cognitive, perception, physiological, learning, motivation, developmental, abnormal, industrial, social, and personality).
  • Diversity: Recognize the impact of human diversity (gender, race, ethnicity, socio-economic status, sexual orientation, culture, age, religion, disabilities) on behavior and mental processes.
  • Ethics: Demonstrate knowledge of professional ethics in the use of research subjects.
  • Critical Thinking: Ability to critically evaluate various research methods and designs by formulating vital questions; gathering relevant articles; identifying their strengths, weaknesses, and implications for psychological inquiry; and developing an integrative conclusion.
  • Communication: Write effectively by producing work in the APA style and standards.

Policies

Students majoring in Psychology must meet all degree requirements of USFSM and the CSM, as well as the following:

  • To continue in the program, students must have a GPA of at least 2.00 in PSY 2012, PSY 3204, and PSY 3213.
  • Consistent with USF system policy, a total of 42 upper-level credit hours are required of all undergraduate psychology majors.

State-Mandated Common Prerequisites

The following courses are prerequisites for the major in Psychology:

State Prerequisite USFSM Course Offering
 Course Number  Course Number Credit Hours
PSY XXXX Or any other lower level Psychology class within the Psychology Inventory (i.e., CLP, DEP, EAB, EXP, INP, PCO, PPE, and PSB prefixes) DEP 2004, INP 2101  3
PSY X012 PSY 2012 3
STA XXXX STA 2023 3
BSC X0XX or BSC X20X or ZOO X010 Biology BSC 1005, BSC 2010/L, or BSC 2011/L 3 or 4

Program of Study

The following 34 upper-level semester hours are required of all undergraduate majors in Psychology although students can elect to take more.

Required Degree Core (13 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)

3000-Level Core Courses

PSY 3204 Psychological Statistics 3 PR: PSY 2012 Should be taken in the first term of upper-level course work. Students are strongly encouraged to take STA 2023 prior to enrolling in PSY 3204.
PSY 3213 Research Methods in Psychology 4 PR: PSY 3204 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 or QMB 2100, with a grade of “C” or better Should be taken in the first term of upper-level coursework,

4000-Level Core Courses

CLP 4433 Psychological Tests and Measurement 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
OR
PSY 4205 Experimental Design and Analysis  3 PR: PSY 3213 with grade of “C” or better
PSY 4938 Pro Seminar 3 PR: PSY 3213; Area I and Area II requirements complete; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC; Should be taken as late in program as possible, ideally in the final term.

Courses in Cognitive/Neural Sciences – Students must choose at least two (2) courses from the following (6 credit hours):

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
EXP 4204C Perception 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4404 Psychology of Learning 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
PSB 4004C Physiological Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4304 Motivation 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4680C Cognitive Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better

Courses in Social/Applied Psychology – Students should choose at least two (2) courses from the following (6 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
INP 4004 Industrial Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better SMLE
SOP 4004 Social Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
DEP 4053 Developmental Psychology 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
PPE 4003 Personality 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better

Required Electives (9 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
DEP 4135 Psychology of Language Development 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
PSB 3444 Drugs and Behavior 3 None
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 None
SOP 4751 Psychology Applied to Law 3 PR: PSY 3213
PSB 3842 Sleep and Dreams 3 None
EXP 4640 Psychology of Language 3 PR: PSY 3213
SOP 4777 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 PR: PSY 2012, PSY 3204, STA 2122 and a General Biology course USFSM considers STA 2023 to be equivalent to STA 2122
PSY 4931 Selected Topics: Seminar 3 PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better; Junior or Senior Standing, Psychology Majors only May be repeated with different titles
PSY 4913 Directed Study 1-3 PR: PSY 3213 No more than three (3) credits may be applied toward the major

Electives and Minors

The requirements for the Psychology degree allow for electives outside the major. Students are encouraged to use these credits to pursue a minor that will broaden and enrich their major studies. Students may elect to pursue any minor; however, the following minors at USFSM would well complement a Psychology degree:  Applied Statistics, Biology, Criminology, Gerontology, Leadership Studies, or Sociology.


 



 


Applied Statistics

The minor in Applied Statistics (APSM) consists of a minimum of 6 courses (20 credit hours). The four required core courses (14 credits) will establish the foundation for statistical learning and knowledge of discrete and continuous distributions. This will lead to the implementation of the two elective courses (6 credits from the list of elective courses) which will further strengthen the ability to apply statistical knowledge to various disciplines. This minor requires admission as an undergraduate student to the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee. Students who enroll in this minor program will be required to take 6 hours of the elective courses at the University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee campus. The required GPA is at least a 2.0 average across all University level coursework.

Requirements (20 credit hours)

Required Courses (14 credit hours)

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
MAC 2311 Calculus I or approved equivalency 4 C (2.0) or better in MAC 1114 and C (2.0) or better in MAC 1140, or C (2.0) or better in MAC 1147, or SAT Math score of 650 or better, or ACT Math score of 29 or better, or College-Level Math CPT score of 90 or better, and knowledge of trigonometry or approved equivalency 6AMM
MAC 2312 Calculus II or approved equivalency 4 C (2.0) or better in MAC 2311 or approved equivalency 6AMM
STA 2023 Introductory Statistics I 3 C (2.0) or better in MAT 1033, or SAT Math score of 440 or better, or ACT Math score of 19 or better, or Elementary Algebra CPT score of 72 or better 6AMM, SMMA
QMB 3200 Business & Economic Statistics II 3 MAC 2233 Minimum Grade: C-, or MAC 2241 Minimum Grade: C-, or MAC 2311 Minimum Grade: C-, or Calculus AB Minimum Score: 3, or Calculus BC Minimum Score: 3, or Calculus AB Subscore Minimum Score: 4, or MAC 2281 Minimum Grade: C- and QMB 2100 Minimum Grade: C-, or STA 2023 Minimum Grade: C-, or STA 2122 Minimum Grade: C-
or
STA 3024 Introductory Statistics II 3 STA 2023 or approved equivalency

Electives Courses (6 credit hours)

Choose two courses from the list below.

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
ISS 3311 Applied Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 STA 2023 (or approved equivalency)
MAT 4906 Independent Study 3 None or CI; S/U only Note: this course requires that the student will use statistical software and programming packages to analyze data and determine statistical problems.
PSY 4205 Experimental Design and Analysis 3 PSY 3213 with minimum grade of C (or approved equivalency)
STA 4930 Selected Topics in Statistics 3 STA 2023 (or approved equivalency) This course will be offered in the fall and spring terms.

 


Biology

The minor in Biology (BIOM) consists of a minimum of 24 credit hours.

The following six (6) courses are required (12 credit hours) plus 12 credits of any upper-level courses with the prefixes BOT, BSC, MCB, PCB, or ZOO:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I 3 PR: 550 SAT Quantitative score or completion of MAC 1105 College Algebra with a C
or better AND one year of high school chemistry or completion of CHM 2023 with a grade of C or
better
 SMNS
CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 CP: CHM 2045 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent
BSC 2010 Cellular Processes 3 CR: BSC 2010L  SMNS
BSC 2010L Cellular Processes Laboratory 1 CR: BSC 2010
BSC 2011 Biodiversity 3 CR: BSC 2011L  SMNS
BSC 2011L Biodiversity Laboratory 1 CR: BSC 2011

 


Psychology

A minor in Psychology (PSYM) consists of a minimum of six (6) courses (19 credit hours)
The following three (3) required courses (10 credit hours) plus any three (3) upper-level psychology courses, except PSY 4913, with the following prefixes: PSY, PPE, PSB, INP, SOP, DEP, EXP, CLP (9 credit hours) Statistics and Research Methods are prerequisites for all electives:

Course Number Title Credit Hours Requisites (KEY) Notes (KEY)
PSY 2012 Introduction to Psychological Science 3 None SMSS
PSY 3204 Psychological Statistics 3 PR: PSY 2012
OR
STA 2122 Social Science Statistics  3 None
PSY 3213 Research Methods in Psychology 4 PR: PSY 3204 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 or QMB 2100, with a grade of “C” or better Should be taken before upper-level electives; may be taken after or with Statistics

 


 


Undergraduate Course Descriptions

S
U
B
J
N
U
M
FULL TITLE CR C
O
L
D
E
P
T
DESCRIPTION REQUISITES
Key
CODES
Key
ACG 2021 Principles of Financial Accounting 3 BA ACC Study of basic accounting principles including the recording and reporting of financial activity. The preparation and interpretation of financial statements. None
ACG 2071 Principles of Managerial Accounting 3 BA ACC A study of the accountant’s role in assisting management in the planning and controlling of business activities. PR: ACG 2021 with a grade of C- or better
ACG 3006 Professional Topics in Accounting 2-3 BM ACC The course will develop an in-depth understanding of the theoretical frameworks used in financial reporting and use this understanding to analyze and solve complex analytical problems in financial reporting. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of C or better
ACG 3074 Managerial Accounting for Non-Business Majors 3 BA ACC The study of the uses of accounting data internally by managers in planning and controlling the affairs of organizations. Does not count towards major or CPA requirements. Not available for credit for Business majors
ACG 3103 Intermediate Financial Accounting I 3 BA ACC Theory and methodology underlying financial reporting, including the FASB’s conceptual framework, the accounting process, financial statements, accounting changes, present value applications, and current assets. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; CP: ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-. ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3103.
ACG 3113 Intermediate Financial Accounting II 3 BA ACC Continuation of ACG 3103. Topics covered include property, plant and equipment, intangibles, current liabilities, long-term debt, leases, tax allocation, statement of cash flows. PR: ACG 3103 and ACG 3341 or ACG 3401 or TAX 4001 with a grade of C or better, not C-
ACG 3341 Cost Accounting and Control I 3 BA ACC Deals with cost accounting systems for different entities, cost behavior patterns, cost-volume-profit analysis, relevant information for decision making, and budgets and standard costs for planning and control. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; CP: ACG 3103 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-. ACG 3103 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3341.
ACG 3401 Accounting Information Systems 3 BA ACC This course provides students with a basic understanding of well-controlled information systems in a variety of technological environments with added emphasis on the collection, processing, and reporting of accounting information. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071 with a grade of C or better, not C-; CP: ACG 3103 with a grade of C or better, not C-. ACG 3103 can be taken concurrently with ACG 3401.
ACG 4123 Intermediate Financial Accounting III 3 BA ACC Theory and practice underlying stockholders’ equity, dilutive securities and EPS, derivatives, revenue recognition, post-retirement benefits, error analysis, full disclosure, and other current accounting topics. PR: ACG 3113 with a grade of C or better, not C-.
ACG 4351 Cost Accounting And Control II 3 BA ACC Application of the material covered in ACG 3341 with specific emphasis on cost allocations, performance measurements, analysis of current cost accounting systems and accounting in today’s environment (giving consideration to the influences of the international environment). PR: ACG 3103, ACG 3341 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ACG 4501 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting 3 BM ACC Application of financial and managerial accounting, and auditing, principles and theory to both governmental and not-for-profit entities. PR: ACG 3113 with a grad of “C” or better
ACG 4632 Auditing I 3 BA ACC This course provides a sound conceptual foundation of basic auditing process from the perspective of the public accounting profession. Professional standards, ethics, legal responsibilities, and the utilization of technology are addressed. PR: ACG 3113, ACG 3401
ACG 4642 Auditing II 3 BA ACC Further development of material covered in ACG 4632, with special emphasis on additional reporting topics and audit techniques not previously addressed. PR: ACG 4632 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ACG 4931 Selected Topics In Accounting 1-3 BA ACC The course content will depend on student demand and instructor’s interest.  None
ACG 5205 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 BA ACC Accounting for business combinations, preparation of consolidated financial statements, home office/branch relationships, foreign operations and transactions, partnerships. PR: ACG 3113 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ACG 5375 Valuation of Closely Held Businesses 3 BA ACC Prepares students to assess how a firm can increase its value. Students develop an understanding of the principles behind business valuation and learn how to use these principles to assess a company’s value through a case study PR: ACG 2021
ACG 5505 Governmental/Not-For-Profit Accounting 3 BA ACC Application of financial and managerial accounting, and auditing, principles and theory to both governmental and not-for-profit entities. PR: ACG 3113 CR: ACG 4632
ACG 5675 Internal and Operational Auditing 3 BA ACC The objective of Internal and Operational Auditing is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about the theory and practice of internal and operational auditing and to apply relevant audit principles and techniques to selected audit problems. PR: ACG 3113, ACG 3401 CR: ACG 4632
AFA 4931 Selected Topics in Africana Studies 1-3 AS AFA Topics offered are selected to reflect student needs and faculty interests. In depth study in such areas as the Black Student and the American Educational Process; the Black Experience in the Americas; European Expansion in Africa to 19th century; Contemporary Economic Problems in Africa. None
AMH 2010 American History I 3 AS HTY This class is an introductory survey of American history from Columbus and “First Contact” to Reconstruction. None SMSS, HP
AMH 2020 American History II 3 AS HTY A history of the United States with attention given to relevant developments in the Western Hemisphere from 1877 to the present. None SMSS, HP
AMH 3130 The American Revolutionary Era 3 AS HTY Emphasis on the causes of the American revolution, the nature of Constitution-making, and the establishment of the federal system. Also examines the significance of loyalism, violence, and slavery in American society from 1750-1789. None
AMH 3140 The Age of Jefferson 3 AS HTY A comprehensive study of American society and political culture from 1789-1828. Focuses on demographic trends, party systems, expansionism, Indian policy, labor, and ethno-cultural conflicts. None
AMH 3201 The United States, 1877-1914 3 AS HTY A study of America from the end of Reconstruction to World War I. Ranging over political, social, and international developments, the course covers industrialization, immigration, unions, reform, feminism, race relations and imperialism. None
AMH 3231 The United States, 1914-1945 3 AS HTY The United States from World War I to the end of World War II. Covering political, social and international developments, the course examines the lives of Americans, including minorities and women, during war, prosperity, and the Great Depression. None
AMH 3421 Early Florida 3 AS HTY A history of colonial Florida under the Spanish and English. Florida as an area of discovery, colonization, and imperial conflict; the emergence of Florida within the regional setting. None
AMH 3423 Modern Florida 3 AS HTY An historical survey of Florida from the territorial period to the modern era. An examination of the social, political, and economic changes occurring in Florida between 1821 and the 1980s. None
AMH 3562 American Women II 3 AS HTY A study of women in the evolution of American society from 1877 to the present. Women’s roles in the family, economy, politics, immigration, wars, religion and reform movements will be examined. None
AMH 3571 African American History to 1865 3 AS AFA This course surveys the history of people of African-descent in the U.S. from the beginning of the Atlantic Slave Trade to 1865. Major topics include the rise & fall of slavery, ethnic & racial identities, resistance, gender, culture, and community. None HP
AMH 3572 African American History since 1865 3 AS AFA This course explores the history of African Americans since 1865. Major topics include the struggle for equality, class and gender dimensions of the Black freedom struggle, and the varied approaches in the fight against oppression and inequality. None HP
AML 3031 American Literature From the Beginnings to 1860 3 AS ENG A study of representative works from the period of early settlement through American Romanticism, with emphasis on such writers as Cooper, Irving, Bryant, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Thoreau, and Poe, among others. None
AML 3032 American Literature From 1860 to 1912 3 AS ENG A study of representative works of selected American Realists and early Naturalists, among them Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Dreiser, Wharton, Robinson, Dunbar, and Johnson. None
AML 3051 American Literature From 1912-1945 3 AS ENG A study of poetry, drama, and fiction by such writers as Pound, Stein, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Porter, Toomer, Cummings, Williams, Anderson, Steinbeck, Wright, West, Stevens, Henry Miller, and others. None
AML 3604 African American Literature 3 AS ENG A study of black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W.E.B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. None  SMCD
AML 3630 U.S. Latino/Latina Literature in English 3 AS ENG This 3000-level literature course surveys American English literature by Latino/Latina writers (with Spanish American ancestry). Authors may include Piri Thomas, Sandra Cisneros, Esmeralda Santiago, Luis Valdéz, Tomás Rivera, Oscar Hijuelos, etc. PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102 SMCD
AML 4111 Nineteenth-Century American Novel 3 AS ENG A study of the American novel from its beginnings through 1900, including such novelists as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, James, Twain, Crane, and Dreiser, among others. None
AML 4121 Twentieth-Century American Novel 3 AS ENG A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1900 to the present, including works by such writers as Hemingway, London, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Mailer, Bellow, Ellison, Donleavy, Updike, Vonnegut, and others. None
AML 4261 Literature of the South 3 AS ENG A study of the major writers of the Southern Renaissance, including writers such as Faulkner, Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, McCullers, O’Connor, Warren, Styron, Tate, Davidson, and Dickey. None
AML 4300 Selected American Authors 3 AS ENG The study of two or three related major authors in American literature. The course may include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and Faulkner, James and Twain, Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell, etc. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. None
AML 4931 American Literary Movements and Genres 3 AS ENG Looks at a movement or genre in American literature (19th-century novel, Harlem Renaissance, Puritan sermons, etc.). Building on skills from survey courses, class requires heavy but focused reading, familiarity with literary scholarship, and writing. PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
AML 4933 Studies in American Literature and Culture 3 AS ENG This course examines a particular topic or theme, varying with individual selection, in the American literary tradition. PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
AML 3604 African American Literature 3 LM ENG A study of black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W.E.B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni. None SMCD
ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 AS ANT The cross-cultural study of the human species in biological and social perspective. Surveys the four major branches of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and cultural anthropology. None SMSS, SS, AP
ANT 2410 Cultural Anthropology 3 AS ANT Students are exposed to methods and concepts for cross cultural study of the world’s peoples. Case studies demonstrate variations in human adaptation and encourage an understanding of and appreciation for diverse cultures and their values. None SMSS, SS
ANT 3005 The Anthropological Perspective 3 AS ANT Presents the basic concepts of anthropology as they are relevant to contemporary life. Aims at enabling the student to understand the anthropologist’s cross-cultural view of the human species as adapting through biosocial means to life on this planet. For non-anthropology majors only. May not be counted for credit toward an anthropology major. AP
ANT 4241 Anthropology of Religion 3 AS ANT The cross-cultural study of the social and cultural aspects of religion will be explored. Religious activities in traditional and modern societies will be discussed. Ritual behavior, religious practitioners, and symbols of belief will be considered. PR: ANT 2000, ANT 2410.
ANT 4302 Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective 3 AS ANT Examines roles of women, men, other genders and social, economic, and political aspects of sex and gender, from a biocultural, 4-field anthropological perspective, emphasizing non-Western societies and cross-cultural comparison in past and present. An anthropology or a women’s studies class. MW
ANT 4316 Ethnic Diversity in the United States 3 AS ANT Special concerns include ethnic diversity in American society, historical and contemporary diversity in values, experiences, and lifestyles, and an examination of policies and problems affecting ethnic groups in the United States. PR: ANT 2410; DPR MW
ANT 4401 Exploring Cross-Cultural Diversity 3 AS ANT This course will address a variety of challenging issues related to the general topic of cross-cultural diversity in contemporary American life. None MW
ANT 4432 The Individual and Culture 3 AS ANT The relationship between the individual and society is studied cross-culturally. Main themes include child-rearing practices, psychosomatic illness and curing. Discussion of theories and models of personality development with special reference to their applicability to the emerging field of cross-cultural mental health planning. PR: ANT 2410; DPR MW
ANT 4462 Health, Illness, and Culture 3 AS ANT The study of health and human behavior in cross-cultural perspective. Main themes include: the impact of disease on the development of human culture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical systems in their relationship to ideology. Emphasis on understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of both practitioners and patients in modern societies. PR: ANT 2410; DPR
ANT 4586 Prehistoric Human Evolution 3 AS ANT A survey of the fossil record from the early primates through the ascent of Homo sapiens sapiens, focusing on the human lineage. Biosocial patterns and cultures of the past are also covered. PR: ANT 2511; DPR
ANT 4905 Individual Research 2-4 AS ANT Individual guidance in a selected research project. Contract required prior to registration. DPR; S/U
ANT 4930 Special Topics in Anthropology 1-3 AS ANT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. Variable depending on topic; DPR
ARH 2000 Art and Culture 3  LM ART This course offers students an enhanced appreciation and understanding of art.  Student will critically evaluate a broad range of imagery, media, artists, movements and historical periods in the visual arts. None SMHU, 6ACM
ARH 2050 History of Visual Arts I 3 FA ART Survey of World Art to AD 1300. Introduction to problems of analyzing and interpreting the art of various cultures without making the Western perspective a privileged one. None HP, FA
ARH 2051 History of Visual Arts II 3 FA ART Survey of World Art since 1300. Introduction to problems of analyzing and interpreting the art of various cultures without making the Western perspective a privileged one. None HP, FA
ARH 4930 Art History: Selected Topics 1-3 FA ART Lecture/discussion course designed to offer areas of expertise of visiting scholars or specific interests of resident faculty. None
ASL 2140C Basic American Sign Language 4 BC CSD Introduction to American Sign Language (ASL) as used in the deaf community. General discussion of ASL structure and introduction to various manual communication systems and philosophies. Emphasis on building a basic vocabulary. One hour of laboratory coursework is included. Open to all majors. DPR
ASL 2150C Intermediate American Sign Language 4 BC CSD A continuation of the basic course which expands the student’s signing skills and introduces American Sign Language (ASL) idioms. Provides a greater opportunity for skill development in ASL structure and idiomatic usage. One hour of laboratory coursework is included. PR: ASL 2140C; DPR
AST 2002 Descriptive Astronomy 3 AS  AST An introductory and overview of astronomy course. It is designed to introduce a broad range of topics in astronomy that will be discussed in greater detail in more advanced classes. None SMNS
AST 3033 Contemporary Thinking in Astronomy 3 AS AST Seminar designed to assist the layman, with no scientific background, in comprehending contemporary developments in Astronomy. Necessary background material is provided by the instructor and a text. Topics covered in recent years include the space program, pulsars, x-ray astronomy, black holes, extra-terrestrial life, interacting galaxies, cosmology. Junior or Senior Standing; CI NS
BCH 4033 Advanced Biochemistry I 3 AS CHM Introduction to the chemistry and intermediary metabolism of biologically important substances. PR: CHM 2211, BSC 2010
BOT 3152C Field Botany 3 AS BIN A field course emphasizing identification and classification of native and naturalized flowering plants of Florida including historical, climatic, and floristic aspects of plant communities. Fieldwork required. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046 and MAC 1105 or higher level MAC course or STA 2023
BOT 3850 Medical Botany 3 AS BIO Study of agents that are produced by plants and that are toxic or psychoactive in human beings or are useful as remedies. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2210, and MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
BSC 1005 Biological Principles for Non Majors 3 AS BCM A comprehensive introduction to living systems, including the scientific basis
of biology, cell structure and function, genetic mechanisms, human anatomy and
physiology, and ecological and evolutionary processes
None SMNS
BSC 2010 Cellular Processes 3 AS BCM This course deals with biological systems at the cellular and subcellular levels. Topics include an introduction to biochemistry, cell structure and function, enzymes, respiration, mitosis and meiosis, genetics and gene expression. CR: BSC 2010L SMNS, NS
BSC 2010L Cellular Processes Laboratory 1 AS BCM Laboratory portion of Biology I Cellular Processes relating to cellular and
subcellular structure and function. Mitosis, meiosis, and Mendelian genetics
will be stressed
CR: BSC 2010
BSC 2011 Biodiversity 3 AS BCM Biodiversity is an analysis of biological systems at the organismal level:
evolution, speciation, history of life, and ecology
CR: BSC 2011L SMNS
BSC 2011L Biodiversity Laboratory 1 AS BIN Laboratory portion of Biology II Diversity relating to organismal structure and function. Microscopy, as well as, plant and animal development will be stressed. CR: BSC 2011
BSC 2093C Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 AS BIN Basic biochemistry, cell structure and function, tissues, anatomical terminology, anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045
BSC 2094C Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 AS BIN Anatomy and physiology of the autonomic nervous, endocrine, circulatory, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive, excretory, and reproductive systems. Lecture and Laboratory. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, BSC 2093C, CHM 2045
BSC 3312 Marine Biology 3 AS BIN A survey of the marine environment, the types of organisms found inhabiting a variety of marine habitats, and the adaptations of the organisms to those habitats. Emphasis is placed on shallow water Florida environments. Lecture only. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046,  MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023
BSC 3453 Research Methods in Biology 3 LM BIO This course utilizes a hands-on, application-oriented approach to enhance student understanding of: framing scientific questions based on scientific literature; experimental design; data analysis; writing technical reports; and presenting seminars. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, STA 2023
BSC 3848 Scientific Communication 1 MM BIO This course will be taken in conjunction with an upper level biology lab course. Students will work on developing and communication research questions and experimental designs with peers in both written and oral formats. Requires an upper-level lab co-req. PR: ENC 1101 with at least a grade of “C”, ENC 1102 with at least a grade of “C”
BSC 4052 Conservation Biology 3 AS BIN This course provides an extensive introduction to current models and empirical study in conservation biology, including substantial hands-on experience with programming methods for study of data and models. PR: PCB 3043, BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2045, CHM 2046, Calculus (MAC 2241/2281/2311)
BSC 4057 Environmental Issues 3 AS BIO Study of biological, economic, ethical, legal, political, and social issues relating to current environmental problems. None SMCD
BSC 4905 Independent Study 1-3 AS BIO Specialized independent study determined by the student’s needs and interests. The written contract required by the Department of Biology specifies the regulations governing independent study. May be taken by majors for free elective credit; S/U
BSC 4910 Undergraduate Research 1-4 AS BIO Individual investigation with faculty supervision. Written contract by Department is necessary prior to registration. S/U only. Junior standing and 3.0 GPA required. PR: CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher MAC course or STA 2023;  CP:  PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 or CHM 2211
BSC 4933 Selected Topics in Biology 1-4 AS BIO The course content will depend on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
BSC 4937 Seminar in Marine Biology 2 AS BIN Course focuses on developing the student’s understanding of contemporary research in the field of Marine. Background information presented and assigned reading will vary according to instructor. PR: BSC 3312C, CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712 and CHM 2211
BSC 4938 Biology Capstone 3 MM BIO This course is intended to provide advanced undergraduates with a “capstone” experience in biology and provides the opportunity to synthesize and apply learning from other courses as they explore a specific topic, which will vary. Senior Standing in Biology SMCC, 6ACM
BUL 3320 Law and Business I 3 BA GBA This course covers the nature of legal and societal institutions and environments, and major aspects of public, private, UCC and related business law. None
BUL 5332 Law and the Accountant 3 BA ACC A comprehensive study of commercial law as it affects the practice of accounting. PR: BUL 3320
CAP 4790 Data & Security Analytics 3 BM EIT The course provides a detailed understanding of Data as a valuable asset of the organization and the need to secure it. Data also requires analytics to provide insights into trends and context of technical, economic, and social and environments. None
CCJ 3024 Survey of the Criminal Justice System 3 BC CJP An introduction to the structure and operation of law enforcement, prosecution, the courts, and corrections. Also includes brief coverage of major reported crimes. None SS
CCJ 3117 Theories of Criminal Behavior 3 BC CJP Provides a basic understanding of the complex factors related to crime, with concentration on principal theoretical approaches to the explanation of crime. PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 3336 Prisoner Reentry and Recidivism: When Inmates Come Home 3 BC CJP Students will study prisoner reentry and recidivism in the U.S. by working with local organizations to understand the challenges facing ex-inmates and assist those attempting to combat these challenges and ease an ex-inmate’s reintegration into society. None SMCD
CCJ 3621 Patterns of Criminal Behavior 3 BC CJP Reviews the nature and extent of the crime problem. The course will concentrate on major patterns of offender behavior including crimes against the person, property crimes, violent crimes, economic/white collar offense, syndicated (organized) crimes, consensual crimes, female crime, political crime, and will examine criminal career data. Junior Standing
CCJ 3644 White Collar Crime 3 BC CJP This course is designed to introduce you to the topic of white-collar crime, including crime that is committed in or by corporate and other types of organizational entities. None
CCJ 3670 Women & Crime 3 LM CJP Women and Crime is designed to provide an overview of the roles of women in society and how those roles affect the treatment of women in the criminal justice system as victims, offenders, and employees. PR: CCJ 3024 with a grade of “C” or better
CCJ 3701 Research Methods in Criminal Justice I 3 BC CJP Introduces the student to some of the fundamentals of knowledge-generating processes in criminal justice.  PR: CCJ 3117 with a grade of “C” or better, not a C-; Junior Standing
CCJ 4450 Criminal Justice Administration 3 BC CJP This course is designed to provide an in-depth examination of both the practical and theoretical aspects of the administration of criminal justice agencies. The major focus will be on law enforcement and correctional agencies. PR: CJE 4114 or CJT 4100; Junior Standing
CCJ 4604 Abnormal Behavior and Criminality 3 BC CJP A systematic introduction to the relationship between mental illness and criminality, with focus on psychiatric labeling of deviant behavior and its implications for the handling of the criminal offender. PR: CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 BC CJP (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrangements with a faculty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course.(b) A minimum of four 4 CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment.(c) First consideration will be given to Criminology majors.(d) Individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. No more than six hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major. This course is specifically designed to enable advanced students the opportunity to do in-depth independent work in the area of criminal justice. Each student will be under the close supervision of a faculty member of the program. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
CCJ 4910 Directed Research 1-3 BC CJP (a) Students wishing to enroll must make arrangements with a faculty member during the semester prior to actually taking the course.(b) A minimum of four 4 CCJ courses must have been completed satisfactorily prior to enrollment.(c) First consideration will be given to Criminology majors.(d) Individual faculty members may add additional requirements at their discretion. No more than six hours of CCJ 4900, CCJ 4910 or any combination of the two will be accepted toward the minimum number of hours required for the major. This course is designed to provide students with a research experience in which they will work closely with faculty on the development and implementation of research projects in the area of criminal justice. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3621; Junior Standing; CI; S/U
CCJ 4930 Critical Issues in Policing 3 BC CJP Focuses on some of the most critical issues in law enforcement today including: understanding and controlling police use of deadly force; police deviance; police prejudice and discrimination; violence-prone police officers; substance abuse by police officers; and administrative review of alleged police brutality. PR: CCJ 3024 or CJE 4114; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4933 Selected Topics in Criminology 3 BC CJP Lecture course. Topic varies and is designed to address a wide variety of issues in criminology and criminal justice. Open to non-majors with CI. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CCJ 4934 Seminar in Criminology 3 BC CJP These variable topic seminars are used for the in-depth study and discussion of the relationships among culture, gender, ethics, age, society, and criminal behavior. Such examinations may include the options the criminal justice does (or does not) have to deal with these interactions, and the ethics and efficacy of the system’s response. Open to non-majors with CI. PR: CCJ 3701 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; Senior Standing MW
CCJ 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar 3 LM CJP This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the American criminal justice system and crime theories, and show competency in research methods, critical thinking, and scholarly writing. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117, CCJ 3701 SMCC, 6ACM
CCJ 4940 Internship For Criminal Justice Majors 3 BC CJP The internship will consist of placement with one or more of the agencies comprising the criminal justice system. This course will enable the students to gain meaningful field experience related to their future careers. The three-hour block of credit will require a minimum of ten hours of work per week during a fall or spring term, fifteen hours per week in summer, within the host agencies in addition to any written work or reading assignments. See requirements for the B.A. degree in Criminology for the number of hours required. PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3621, CCJ 3117; Senior Standing; S/U; No more than 9 hours of CCJ 4940 will be accepted toward the elective hours required for the major
CCJ 4955 Intro to Crime Mapping with ArcGIS 3 LM CJP This course is designed to cover the basic concepts and applications of mapping with ArcGIS to explore or explain crime or crime-related issues or outcomes.
CCJ 4956 Environmental Criminology 3 LM CJP This course is designed to explore issues related to the crime hot spots and the relationship between crime hot spots and environmental factors.
CCJ 4957 Crime Prevention 3 LM CJP This course is designed to provide an exploration of the various theoretical bases and their approaches to reducing crime in settings such as neighborhoods, parking lots, retail stores, and social media.
CDA 3101 Computer Organization for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Elements of the computer are discussed in terms of the physical and conceptual design of memory, processors, busses and I/O elements. Organization of the system is cast in a meta-language that captures the logical and physical nature of the computer. PR: CGS 3303; CI
CEN 3040 Integrated Development Environments (Eclipse) 3 BM EIT This course focuses on the use of the Eclipse IDE for developing Java applications. Students will also learn how to take advantage of the plug-in architecture of Eclipse. PR: COP 2250
CEN 3722 Human Computer Interfaces for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Human-Computer Interface is the study of people, computer technology and the ways these influence each other. The basic foundations of HCI in terms of psychology, computer systems and their integration into design practice are discussed in the course. PR: COP 3515
CEN 4020 Software Engineering 3 EN ESB An overview of software engineering techniques for producing high quality software. Student will participate in a software development team. PR: COP 4530
CEN 4031 Software Engineering Concepts for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Concepts associated with production of high quality software through the use of software engineering concepts and practices are covered. In addition to conceptual presentations, students are required to participate in software development team projects. PR: EEL 4854; CI
CGS 2100 Computers in Business 3 BA QMB A study of the use and impact of computers in all areas of business organizations. Course includes hands-on experience and the use of software packages for business analysis. None
CGS 3303 IT Concepts 3 EN EIT An introduction to the various facets of the field of Information Technology.  Topics such as operating systems, networking, programming, hardware, and computation theory will be overviewed. PR: CGS 1540
CGS 3373C Data Networking & Communications 3 BM EIT The course is a breadth-first view of computing technology fundamentals & networking concepts. Major concepts are presented so as to make clear the “big picture” of the discipline. Course is one of several that form the foundation of the BSCyS&IT degree. CyS&IT Majors Only
CGS 3374C Architecture & Operating Systems 3 BM EIT The course provides a comprehensive and integrated understanding of computer functions. It combines both computer hardware organization and supporting operating systems structures to enhance the students’ problem solving skills. PR: CGS 3373 with a grade of “C-” or better
CGS 3845 Electronic Commerce 3 EN EIT An overview of how E-Commerce evolved, what EC is; how it is being conducted and managed; its major opportunities, issues, and risks. Discussions include: The Internet, intranets, firewalls, etc. Exercises will use various Web and software and packages. PR: COP 2510 or equivalent
CGS 3847 Portal Development and E-Commerce 3 BM EIT This course familiarizes students with challenges associated with e-commerce and its business models, by exploring underlying technologies used to implement e-commerce systems and web portals.  Includes portal management and SAP portals development. PR: GEB 3016; CP: COP 4834
CGS 3850 Web Development: JavaScript & jQuery 3 BM EIT JavaScript is used to develop interactive Web pages/sites. OO language, with its dynamic functionality, is quickly inserted into a Web page. Used on WWW it is the most popular programming language worldwide & is the basis for the jQuery Library. PR: CGS 3853
CGS 3853 Web Systems for IT 3 EN EIT Examines how web sites are developed. Focus on client-side and server-side scripting including HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. A substantial project requiring the design and implementation of an online web site is required. PR: CEN 3722
CGS 4858 Web Design and Development 3 BM EIT The course covers using HTML (HyperText Markup Language), CSS (Cascading Style Sheets), and JavaScript to produce powerful interactive Web content. PR: COP 3817 with at least a grade of “C-“
CGS 4855 Intermediate Web Development (jQuery) 3 BM EIT This course provides more practical and professional tools for working with Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and JavaScript using the jQuery and the jQuery UI (User Interface) libraries. PR: CGS 3850
CGS 4856 Intermediate Web Design (HTML5) 3 BM EIT This course continues from the first courses in Web Design and Web Development to add the new concepts and capabilities of HTML5. PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, CGS 3853, CGS 3850
CGS 4857 Android Web Applications (w/HTML5, CSS3, JavaScript) 3 BM EIT A mobile web application is one built with core client web technologies.Students
will learn to develop designs for mobile devices; these will also work as
desktop web apps if the browser uses the same versions of technologies (HTML5,
CSS3, JavaScript).
PR: CGS 3853, CGS 3850, CGS 4856
CHM 2020 Chemistry for Liberal Studies I 3 AS CHM This course is designed for liberal arts students to learn basic chemical principles. Students will learn about reactions, energy and the scientific method. The course will have an emphasis on the chemistry of global climate change. None SMNS
CHM 2045 General Chemistry I 3 AS CHM Principles and applications of chemistry including properties of substances and
reactions, thermochemistry, atomic-molecular structure and bonding, periodic
properties of elements and compounds
PR: 550 SAT Quantitative score or completion of MAC 1105 College Algebra with a C or better AND one year of high school chemistry or completion of CHM 2023 with a grade of C or better. SMNS
CHM 2045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 AS CHM Laboratory portion of General Chemistry I.  Introduction to laboratory techniques; study of properties of elements and compounds; synthesis and analysis of natural and commercial materials. CP: CHM 2045 with a grade of “C” or better or equivalent
CHM 2046 General Chemistry II 3 AS CHM Principles and applications of chemistry including solutions, chemical thermodynamics, kinetics, equilibria, aqueous chemistry, electrochemistry, and
nuclear chemistry.
PR: CHS 2045 or CHM 2440 with a “C” or better or Chemistry with a minimum score of 4 SMNS
CHM 2046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 AS CHM Laboratory portion of General Chemistry II. Continuation of chemistry laboratory. PR: CHM 2045L or CHS 2440L with a “C” or better or Chemistry with a minimum score of 4
CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 3 AS CHM Fundamental principles of organic chemistry. Lecture. PR: CHM 2046, CHM 2046L with a C or better
CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 2 AS CHM Laboratory portion of Organic Chemistry I. Introduction of organic laboratory principles and techniques. Lec.-lab. CP: CHM 2200 or CHM 2210
CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II 3 AS CHM Continuation of organic chemistry. PR: CHM 2210 with a C or better
CHM 2211L Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 2 AS CHM Continuation of organic chemistry laboratory. PR: CHM 2210L CR: CHM 2211  SMLE
CHM 2414C Science of Cooking 3 MM CHM An active, experiential-learning environment of interdisciplinary explorations of science as a process, information, and techniques underlying contextually interesting topics pertaining to delicious substances. None SMNS
CHM 4932 Selected Topics in Chemistry 1-3 AS CHM The course content will depend on the interest of faculty members and student demand. None
CHS 4411 Chemistry and Microbiology of Beer 3 MM A series of investigations into the chemistry and microbiology underlying the various aspects of beer, its brewing process, and its pairings with food. PR:  CHM 2045
CIS 3201 Laws and Legal Aspects of IT 3 BM EIT The course provides an overview of rights, responsibilities, and liabilities
associated with IT systems today. Statutes, case histories, regulations, etc.
will be discussed, to understand and control risk. Research topics will be
assigned to students.
PR: CIS 3360 with a grade of B- or better
CIS 3303 Unified Modeling Language 3 BM EIT The Unified Modeling Language (UML) is a world-class visual language for analysis and design of object-oriented systems. This course examines the various graphical tools and their applications in the context of extended case studies. Working knowledge of an Object-Oriented programming language (not Visual Basic).
CIS 3360 Principles of Information Security 3 AS EIT Board review of Information Security and related elements. Includes terminology, history of the discipline, overview of information security program management. Suitable for IS, criminal justice, political science, accounting information systems students. None
CIS 3362 Cryptography and Information Security 3 AS EIT This course examines classical cryptography, entropy, stream and block ciphers, public key versus symmetric cryptography, one-way and trap-door functions, plus other specific tools and techniques in popular use. PR: MAD 2104; CI
CIS 3367 Architecting Operating System Security 3 AS EIT This course examines tools and techniques for securing Windows and Linux operating systems. Students will acquire knowledge and skills to perform audit assessments and implement enterprise-wide operating system security. PR: CIS 3360; CI
CIS 3615 Secure Software Development 3 BM EIT Information is power. It also has value. Thus, there is an incentive for unscrupulous individuals to steal information. This course covers a number of different techniques to help developers to build enterprise-level systems that are secure and safe. PR: COP 3515 with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 3932 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 AS EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CIS 4203 Cyber Forensics & Investigations 3 BM EIT Teaches the methods of acquiring, preserving, retrieving, and presenting data that have been processed electronically and stored on computer media for use in legal proceedings. Focus on MS Windows systems. PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104
CIS 4204 Ethical Hacking 3 BM EIT Provides an understanding of computing, networking, exploitation techniques, used for IT security. In testing, a legal ethical hacker tries to penetrate a system, finds its weakest link and analyzes ways to correct security flaws. PR: COP 2030, MAD 2104
CIS 4216 Aggressive Hacking: What Hackers Do 3 BM EIT Commonly known as Red Teaming, the course provides an understanding of computing, networking, programming concepts, and exploitation techniques, related to computer security. Focus of the course is to legally break-test into systems to improve security. PR: CGS 3373, CGS 3374, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4253 Ethics for Information Technology 3 EN EIT This course covers the professional code of ethics and a survey of ethical issues in computing such as intellectual property, security, privacy, and copyright. Class discussions cover ethical responsibilities of IT professionals and issues that are shaping our society. Senior Standing; Basic computer skills SMLE, MW
CIS 4342 NoSQL Databases 3 BM EIT This course covers various types of unstructured data management technologies, also known as NoSQL databases, such as Columnar, Key-Value, Graphic and Document databases; their schema-free characteristics (ACID) for storage, retrieval and data quality. PR: COP 2250
CIS 4344 Big Data Architecture with Hadoop 3 BM  EIT This course provides students with necessary skills and knowledge to develop practical Big data solutions based on the Hadoop eco-system. Topics include fundamentals of Hadoop 2.x, the HDFS, MapReduce, Spark, Data Analytics using Pig, Hive and YARN. PR: COP 2250
CIS 4361 Information Assurance and Security Management for IT 3 EN EIT The CIANA model, information security management techniques, and security concerns are presented. Topics include access control systems, network security, security management practices, cryptography, disaster recovery planning, and others. PR: COP 3515; Junior or Senior Standing
CIS 4365 Computer Security Policies and Disaster Preparedness 3 EN EIT When an organization’s functioning is interrupted by disasters, accidents, or natural events, a loss of data and/or productivity may occur. The impact on the organization is determined by how prepared it is for dealing with these disruptions. PR: CIS 3360
CIS 4368 Database Security and Audits 3 BM EIT An in-depth look at database security concepts and auditing techniques. Hands-on approach when examining security techniques. Examines different security strategies and advancements in implementation as well as problem solving. PR: COP 3718
CIS 4369 Web Application Security 3 BM EIT This is a comprehensive overview of Web applications and their common vulnerabilities. Web Goat will be used to give students pseudo practical experience with penetration testing tools and to give them concrete examples of the concepts of the class. PR: COP 3718 and CGS 3853 both with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4387 Mobile and Wireless Security 3 BM EIT Mobile/wireless systems provide untethered network connectivity anywhere/anytime. Securing these systems have unique challenges due to travels outside physically protected spaces and limited battery & processing power. This course addresses these issues. PR: CGS 3373, CGS 3374, and COP 2250 or COP 2030 all with a grade of “C-” or better
CIS 4412 Information Technology Resource Management 3 EN EIT An overview of the information resource management function, with emphasis on information systems management, is covered. Topics include planning, organizing and controlling user services, managing information system development process, and the fundamentals of EDP auditing. Junior, Senior, or Graduate Standing
CIS 4510 IT Project Management 3 AS EIT This course covers the general aspects of project management and emphasizes the important, special considerations which apply to information technology projects. Supporting software is used extensively CI
CIS 4512 Agile Risk Management 3 BM EIT This course addresses the risks associated with the IT/Business environment. Risk Management plays a key role in the successful development and implementation of IT projects. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4514 Requirements-Led PM/PM Software Tools 3 BM EIT This course focuses on an innovative approach to using project requirements to
manage the project development life cycle.
PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4515 Managing Global Teams w/Agile 3 BM EIT Global/telecommuting teams deal with tough issues like isolation, lost emails, miscommunication, time zones, lack of face-to-face interactions, travel budget restrictions, and cultural differences which potentially impede productivity and effectiveness. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4518 Quality & Testing w/Agile in Project Management 3 BM EIT This course explains concepts & principles of tenets of quality management
& practical methodologies to implement them. It covers little q & big Q;
addresses thinking, misconceptions & alternative theories, focusing on big Q
to build a case for change.
PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4524 IT Project Schedule & Cost Control 3 BM EIT Students will develop fundamental skills in estimating, scheduling, cost control, and reporting, essential for successful information technology projects. PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4525 Contract Management & Negotiations 3 BM EIT Today’s dynamic performance-based work environment requires partnerships and alliances to obtain a marketable mix of skills, tools and business practices. The course covers key aspects of contract negotiation planning, documenting and closing contracts PR: CIS 4510
CIS 4900 Independent Study In Computer Science 1-5 EN ESB Specialized independent study determined by the needs and interests of the student. PR: COP 4530, CDA 3201; CI; S/U
CIS 4916 Cyber Security and IT Capstone Project 2 BM EIT This course introduces students to the process of research and systematic inquiry and facilitates the mastery of research skills needed to complete projects where an understanding of research methods is critical. Senior in BSAS CyS&IT SMCC, 6ACM
CIS 4930 Special Topics in Computer Science I 1-3 EN ESB  Special topics in computer science and computer engineering. PR: COP 4530, CDA 3201; CI;
CIS 4932 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CIS 4935 Senior Project in Information Technology 3-5 EN EIT This course is the capstone project for IT majors. Students are required to design, implement, and deliver a complete IT solution to a problem leveraging discipline-specific, critical thinking, and communication skills acquired in this major. Senior Standing in CyS&IT SMCC, 6ACM
CJC 4010 American Correctional Systems 3 BC CJP Analysis of the different treatment philosophies and techniques currently in use in the field, with special attention to experimental and demonstration programs. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJC 4166 Alternatives to Incarceration 3 BC CJP This course explores a variety of alternatives to imprisoning the offender, including probation, parole, diversion, and other community-based intervention and treatment approaches. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 3650 Introduction to Forensic Science 3 AP CJP This course provides students an appreciation of ‘real life’ forensic science and its role in the justice system. The class introduces students to the scientific techniques employed by the forensic science community. Not restricted or repeatable. None
CJE 4010 Juvenile Justice System 3 BC CJP Provides coverage of the juvenile and family courts, their clientele, and the complex of human services agencies and facilities that contribute to efforts at juvenile correctional intervention. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJE 4610 Criminal Investigation 3 BC CJP Covers the major components of criminal investigation, with special attention to the scientific aspects of criminal investigation and the management of major cases. PR: CCJ 3024 or CCJ 3117; CI
CJL 3110 Substantive Criminal Law 3 BC CJP Examines the historical basis of the American criminal law system, the substantive elements of the crime, and court procedures.  PR: CCJ 3024, CCJ 3117; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 3502 Introduction to Courts 3 AP CJP Offers understanding of process & functions of US court system. Define & identify different aspects of law & crime; examine aspects of Federal & State court systems; trial process; examine roles of court workers; sentencing. Not restricted or repeatable. None
CJL 4115 Environmental Law and Crime 3 BC CJP The course provides students with an introduction to issues in the area of environmental crime and environmental law.  PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
CJL 4410 Criminal Rights and Procedures 3 BC CJP Emphasizes the Constitutional issues and rules that are applied and enforced by the courts while processing criminal cases. PR: CCJ 3024; Junior Standing; CI
CLP 4143 Abnormal Psychology 3 AS PSY Descriptions, theoretical explanations, research evidence, and treatment of maladaptive behavior. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
CLP 4414 Behavior Modification 3 AS PSY Introduction to behavior analysis, and application of learning principles, behavioral measurement, research designs, and interventions in treatment settings. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
CLP 4433 Psychological Tests and Measurement 3 AS PSY A consideration of the instruments for intellectual and personality assessment including their applications, development, and potential abuses. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
CNT 4403 Network Security and Firewalls 3 EN EIT This course surveys network security standards and emphasizes applications that are widely used on the Internet and for corporate networks. This course also examines Firewalls and related tools used to provide both network and perimeter security. PR: CNT 4104
COM 3014 Communication, Gender, and Identity 3 AS SPE Examines the communicative origins and implications of gender roles. None
COM 3110 Communication for Business and the Professions 3 AS SPE Identification of communication situations specific to business and the professions. Analysis of variables related to communication objectives and preparation of oral presentations in the form of informational reports, conference management, persuasive communications, interviews, and public hearings. None
COM 4022 Health Communication 3 AS SPE Application of communication theory and research to the health context including provider-patient communication, health information campaigns, and health beliefs and behavior. Special attention to the value issues in health communication. None SMCD
COP 2030 Programming Concepts I 3 BM EIT This course covers basic programming concepts using the Python language for implementation and developing problem solving skills. None
COP 2250 Object-Oriented Programming (Java SE) 3 BM EIT This course introduces students to object-oriented programming concepts using Java but via a specially designed Integrated Development Environment (BlueJ). This enables students to directly create objects of any class to interact with their methods. None
COP 2700 Database Systems Basics 3 BM EIT Database systems are described with particular emphasis on Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS). SQLite is the target RDBMS. It is programmatically driven with the Python language and OpenOffice base. PR: COP 2030
COP 2930 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Special topics course. None
COP 2931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Special topics course. None
COP 3259 Advanced Programming in JAVA 3 BM EIT The focus of this course is the comprehensive Java 6 SE specification which defines the advanced Java language features and capabilities. PR: COP 2250
COP 3375C Data Structures and Algorithms w/Python 3 BM EIT

The course provides a comprehensive understanding of the various data structures used to store and retrieve data, and which structures to use when. It integrates theoretical study with hands-on programming to enhance students’ problem solving skills.

PR: COP 2030 with a grade of “C-” or better
COP 3415 Data Structures and Algorithms 3 BM EIT This course is intended to be a first course on data structures and algorithms, implemented using the Python language. As such it deals with abstract data types and data structures. It also deals with writing algorithms and problem solving. PR: COP 3375
COP 3515 Advanced Program Design for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Covers problem solving with an emphasis on the creation of programs to be developed and maintained in a variety of environments from small to large IT organizations. Concepts relating to program efficiency are studied. PR: COP 2512 or equivalent; CI
COP 3718 Database Systems Design 3 BM EIT This course provides an in-depth treatment of working with Relational Database Management System (DBMS), with particular reference to MySQL. It also shows how to interface with MySQL using both PHP and Java languages. PR: COP 2700
COP 3722 Database Systems Design 3 BM EIT This course presents contemporary data modeling and database design techniques in a vendor-neutral manner. Students will learn to create conceptual, logical, and physical data models, specialized techniques for handling temporal and analytical data. PR: COP 2700
COP 3931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
COP 4260 Systems Programming: Java EE 3 BM EIT This course covers Java EE, the Enterprise Java Platform. Java EE is a super-set of Java SE. This platform has matured to a degree where it can be both complete and lightweight, while, at the same time incorporating many new and enhanced tools. PR: COP 2250
COP 4376 Java-Based Python (Jython) 3 BM EIT Focus is on the Python language as used with the Jython (Java-based) interpreter
in a Java EE environment – Python enables the best of two worlds by bridging
between the elegant, expressive code of the Python world and the “”enterprise
ready”” Java world.
PR: COP 3259, COP 3375
COP 4610 Operating Systems for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Introduction to concepts and practices of modern operating systems. Topics include process, parallelism, memory management, resource allocation and file systems. Algorithms are used to understand many of the concepts associated with operating systems. PR: EEL 4854; CI
COP 4610L Operating Systems Laboratory for Information Technology 1 EN EIT Implementation and evaluation of models discussed in the lecture part of the course. Students implement operating system algorithms in stand-alone mode, and modify real operating system code. Students implement and test algorithms in a lab environment. PR: EEL 4854; CI
COP 4663 Mobile Applications Development 3 BM EIT This course provides the beginning programmer with a strong foundation necessary to build mobile applications for Android devices. PR: COP 2030, COP 2250, COP 3375
COP 4703 Database Systems for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Fundamentals of database management systems are presented, covering relational, CODASYL, network, hierarchical, and object-oriented models. Topics include basic design concepts, analysis of efficiency as well as actual implementations of such systems. PR: EEL 4854; CI
COP 4710 Database Design 3 EN ESB This course covers the fundamentals and applications of database management
systems, including data models, relational database design, query languages, and web-based database applications
PR:COP 3331; CP:  COP 4530
COP 4814 Web Services 3 EN EIT The Web services model, based on the Open Standards of SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI, is studied and applied. CI
COP 4816 XML Applications 3 EN EIT This course introduces extensible Markup Language (XML), a technology for exchanging structured information over the Internet, and examines a sampling of its many applications. Completion of prerequisites for admission to CyS&IT program; CI
COP 4834 Data-Driven Web Sites 3 EN EIT This course builds on students’ knowledge of Web development and databases by adding server-side scripting using the PHP language to interact with the mySQL database system to build transaction processing and report generating systems over the Internet. Completion of prerequisites for admission to CyS&IT program; Junior or Senior Standing; CI
COP 4854 Rich Internet Applications 3 BM EIT This capstone course introduces needed technologies in the context of applications to explain links with one another. A number of tools (captured under Rich Internet Applications) are needed to make all of these existing technologies work together. PR: CGS 3850, CGS 3853, COP 4816
COP 4930 Information Technology Seminar 1-3 EN EIT A survey of current Information Technology topics are covered to keep the IT student abreast of the variety of domains associated with their major. Speakers with a wide variety of IT experience will give seminars to senior IT students. Senior CyS&IT Majors Only
COP 4931 Special Topics for Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
CPO 2002 Introduction to Comparative Politics 3 AS POL Comparison and analysis of representative European and non-Western political systems. None SS
CPO 4034 Politics of the Developing Areas 3 AS POL An analysis of the ideologies, governmental structures, and political processes of selected nations of the non-Western world. None
CTS 3165 Linux Essentials 3 BM EIT This course describes installation and configuration of Ubuntu Linux as a powerful desktop workstation capable of competing with the leading desktop operating system, but at a much lower cost. A wide variety of applications are installed to cover many areas. None
CTS 4348 Linux Administration 3 BM EIT The course provides the breadth and depth of material necessary to effectively implement and manage Linux servers in real-world business environments. PR: CTS 3165 Request permit for waiver of prerequisite
CTS 4805 Web Development Tools 3 EN EIT This course builds on web design concepts and extends them to build and maintain complete Web Sites using the current de facto industry-standard integrated web site development environment/applications. CI
DEP 2004 The Life Cycle 3 BC GEY An examination of individuals and the physical, cognitive, personality, and social changes which occur throughout the entire life span. None SMSS
DEP 4053 Developmental Psychology 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in the study of human development. CP: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
DEP 4135 Psychology of Language Development 3 MM PSY This course explores the course of and the processes that underlie language acquisition. Theories and current research surrounding the development of phonological, semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic skills will be presented. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of C or higher
DSC 3013 Terrorism & Homeland Security 3 BC CJP This course will introduce you to the phenomena of contemporary terrorism and extremism. Emphasis will be placed on extremism as a foundation for terrorist behavior, types of terrorism, and how governments and law enforcement agencies respond to terrorism. None
DSC 3594 Introduction to Intelligence Analysis 3 BC CJP This course is designed for understanding how the intelligence community’s history, structure, procedures, and functions affect policy decisions. It will explore challenges facing the intelligence community by examining NSA and CIA programs. None
ECO 1000 Basic Economics 3 AS ECN Survey of economic principles and issues. Scarcity, choice, markets, prices, the monetary system, unemployment, inflation, international trade and finance. No credit after completing either ECO 2023 or ECO 2013 SS
ECO 2013 Economic Principles (Macroeconomics) 3 AS ECN ECO 2013 introduces students to basic economic terminology, definitions and measurements of macroeconomic data, simple macroeconomic models, fiscal and monetary policy, and international macroeconomic linkages. None SMSS, SS
ECO 2023 Economic Principles (Microeconomics) 3 AS ECN Introduction to the theory of price determination. How an economy decides what to produce, how to produce, and how to distribute goods and services. None SMSS, SS
ECO 3101 Intermediate Price Theory 3 AS ECN The price system and allocation of scarce resources between competing uses. May not receive credit for both ECP 3703 and ECO 3101. PR: ECO 2023, MAC 2233 or MAC 2311 or equivalent
ECO 3203 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 AS ECN Determination of income, employment, prices, and interest rates. Aggregate demand and aggregate supply. PR: ECO 2013, ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with a grade of “C” or better
ECO 3703 International Economics 3 AS ECN Role of international trade in the U.S. economy. Gains from trade, balance of payments, exchange rate determination, balance of payments stability, and international commercial policy. PR: ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ECO 4400 Game Theory and Economic Applications 3 AS  ECN This course is an introduction to game theory, the study of strategic behavior among parties having opposed, mixed or similar interests. PR: ECO 2013, ECO 2023
ECP 3203 Labor Economics 3 AS ECN Determinants of wage and employment levels; occupational, industrial and geographical wage differentials; union and public policy effects on labor markets; the economics of discrimination; inflation, and unemployment. PR: ECO 3101 or ECP 3703 with a grade of “C” or better SMLE
ECP 4006 Economics of Sports 3 AS ECN This course teaches economics using sports as a backdrop. Topics covered include the economics of labor markets, exploitation, discrimination, monopoly, monopsony, game theory, bargaining, and cartels. No particular knowledge of sports is required. PR: ECO 3101 or ECP 3703
EDE 4223 Creative Experiences for the Child 3 ED EDE Provides students with critical understanding of visual arts, music, movement, and drama in K-6 curriculum. Students will develop knowledge and strategies to incorporate creative expression into integrated curriculum. Restricted to majors. Not repeatable. School of Education Majors Only
EDE 4302 The Learning Environment 3 LM EDE This course covers the practical, theoretical, and ethical aspects of the learning environment, including the current knowledge of best practices of a variety of management strategies and methods appropriate for a diverse elementary classroom setting. PR: EDE 4947, RED 4310, EEX 4084, MAE 4310; CR: EDE 4948
EDE 4323 Planning for Instruction of Diverse Learners 3 LM EDE This course will explore various theoretical and philosophical beliefs regarding effective instruction. Students will plan rigorous, integrated lessons inclusive of national & state standards & benchmarks while meeting diverse learners’ needs. PR: EDE 4223, EDF 3604, EDF 3122, TSL 4240, all with a minimum grade of C-
EDE  4947 Clinical Education I 3 LM EDE Students will work in an elementary classroom for 3 hours per day of student contact time throughout the semester, learning to plan and instruct pupils and begin to understand the structure and operation of the school. PR: EDF 3122, TSL 4240, both with minimum grade of C-; CR: EEX 4084 Must apply for and be approved by Coordinator of Clinical Education
EDE 4948 Clinical Education II 6 LM EDE Students will teach in an assigned elementary school for 14 weeks. Candidates/mentors assess their teaching abilities and personal attributes necessary to the profession through a process of dialogue and reflection. PR: EDE 4947, EDE 4323, MAE 4310, RED 4511; CR: EDE 4302; CP: RED 4310; DPR Field Experiences are to be approved by the Dean or designee
EDE 4949 Clinical Education III 9-12  LM EDE The teacher candidate is required to demonstrate professional competencies during one semester of full day internship in a public elementary school.  Candidates are expected to perform all teaching duties and responsibilities including a weekly seminar. PR: EDE 4948; DPR; S/U Must have all required state tests and applicable programmatic requirements completed
EDF 2005 Introduction to the Teaching Profession 3 ED EDC Introductory survey course required for admission into the College of Education. A broad overview of the history, sociology and philosophy of education in the United States focuses on education as a field of study and teaching as a profession. Includes lecture and field experience. None  SMEL
EDF 2085 Education, Diversity, and Global Society 3 ED EDC The course explores the role of formal and informal education within an increasingly diverse and global society. The course covers sociocultural approaches to education with a focus on immigration, race, gender, language, sexuality, and ability. None  SMEL
EDF 3122 Learning and the Developing Child 3 ED EDF Preadolescent child growth and development, learning theory, and behavioral analysis applied to instruction and to the organization and management of classroom. PR: General psychology; School of Education Majors Only
EDF 3604 Schools and Society 3 ED EDF Social, economic and political context within which schools function and the values which provide direction for our schools. Junior or Senior Standing SMCD, MW
EDF 3802 Dynamics of Unity 3 LM EAP The conflicts of our time call for individuals who know how to foster authentic unity at all levels of experience. Students will examine multidisciplinary research on the dynamics of unity building and explore their role as leaders in this process. None SMLE
EDF 4430 Measurement For Teachers 3 ED EDQ Concepts and skills related to designing and developing classroom tests; evaluating tests, instruction, and student progress; and communicating student achievement. Including application of performance assessment techniques and computer applications for measuring and assessing pupil progress. School of Education Majors only
EDG 4909 Directed Studies 1-4 ED EDC To extend competency in teaching field. Senior Standing; DPR Offered only as a scheduled class
EEL 4782 Computer Information Networks for Information Technology 3 AS EIT The course covers concepts of computer networks. Physical and logical structures are presented. Physical media, circuit switching, data flow, high-level protocols, and the ISO model are discussed. Bus, ring, star, and wireless topologies are presented. None
EEL 4782L Information Networks Laboratory for Information Technology 1 AS EIT The lab section of this course will allow students to apply hardware and software concepts discussed in the lecture portion of the class. Special isolated networking labs provide both software and hardware tools for student experimentation. PR: COP 4610; CI
EEL 4854 Data Structures and Algorithms for Information Technology 3 EN EIT Representing data for manipulation by the computer is studied. Design and analysis of well-known data structures and algorithms to manipulate them, are studied. Program efficiency, clarity and speed are considered in various structures and algorithms. PR: COP 3515; CI
EEX 4084 Instruction for Exceptional and Diverse Students 3 LM EDE Teacher candidates will review the concepts of differentiated instruction, universal design for learning, and inclusionary classroom practices for exceptional and diverse students with an emphasis on using arts integration. PR: EDE 4223 with a minimum grade of C-; CR: EDE 4947  School of Education Majors only
EME 2040 Introduction to Technology for Educators 3 ED EDK Designed as an introduction to computer technology and its role in teaching and learning processes. Topics include educational software, ethical and social issues, hardware, interactive multimedia, models for integrating technology into instruction, productivity tools and telecommunications. None  SMEL
EML 3022 Computer Aided Design and Engineering 3 EN EGR This course is intended for developing graphics design concepts in undergraduate students. Learning engineering drawing fundamentals, design views, design and analysis of mechanical engineering power transmission components using computer aided software. None
EML 3035 Programming Concepts for Mechanical Engineers 1 EN EGR Solution of engineering and science problems using programming language such as Visual Basic or Maple. Topics include fundamentals of programming, controlling program flow and arrays. Restricted to majors; not repeatable for credit. PR: MAC 2281, PHY 2048
ENC 1101 Composition I 3 AS ENG This course helps prepare students for academic work by emphasizing expository writing, the basics of library research, and the conventions of academic discourse. College level reading and writing 6ACM, SMCO, EC
ENC 1102 Composition II 3 AS ENG This course emphasizes argument, research, and style. As students engage in creative and critical thinking, they learn to support assertions based on audience and purpose; students apply library research, strategies for revision, and peer response. PR: ENC 1101 or the equivalent, i.e. passing the CLEP exam 6ACM, SMCO, EC
ENC 2210 Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Effective presentation of technical and semi-technical information. Will not
count toward the English major
PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMEL
ENC 3241 Scientific Writing and Presentation 3 MM BIO A course designed to give students the skills necessary to prepare professional materials for science writing assignments, presentations, or publication. PR: ENC 1101 with a grade of C or higher, ENC 1102 with a grade of C or higher; Bio majors only
ENC 3242 Technical Communication for Majors 3 AS ENG The study of the range of possible careers for technical communicators with special emphasis on the issues that professional writers face in various workplace contexts and on the skills needed in word processing. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122 SMLE
ENC 3246 Communication for Engineers 3 AS ENG Focuses on writing concerns of engineers. Deals with the content, organization, format, and style of specific types of engineering documents. Provides opportunity to improve oral presentations. None
ENC 3250 Professional Writing 3 AS ENG The course is an introduction to the techniques and types of professional writing, including correspondence and reports. It is designed to help strengthen skills of effective business and professional communication in both oral and written modes. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 3310 Expository Writing 3 AS ENG This is a course that teaches the techniques for writing effective prose, (excluding fiction), in which student essays are extensively criticized, edited, and discussed in individual sessions with the instructor and with peers. PR: ENC 1101and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and  ENC 1122 SMCD
ENC 3416 New Media for Technical Communication 3 AS ENG The study and production of digital media with special emphasis on emergent and evolving applications. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and ENC 1122
ENC 4212 Professional & Technical Editing 3 LM ENG This course helps students meet professional and technical editing challenges in the workplace. Assignments concern research, interviewing, writing, editing, and the technology needed for successful results. Unrestricted to majors, not repeatable. PR: At least one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4260, ENC 4906, ENC 4946, ENC 4268, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4218 Visual Rhetoric for Technical Communication 3 AS ENG The study and production of visual rhetoric with special emphasis on print and digital document design and technical graphics. PR: ENC 1101 and ENC 1102 OR ENC 1121 and 1122
ENC 4260 Advanced Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Advanced Technical Writing is a course designed to develop writing skills of a high order: technical exposition; technical narration, description, and argumentation; graphics; proposals; progress reports; physical research reports; and feasibility reports. PR: ENC 2210, or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4264 Managerial Communications 3 LM ENG This course is designed to strengthen written, oral, and non-verbal skills in the context of managerial communication tasks. The course presents communication skills as integral to management strategy and as vital to workplace success. Non-restricted to majors. PR: Any one of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4311, ENC 4260
ENC 4268 Senior Seminar in Professional & Technical Writing 3 LM ENG This course helps students consolidate learning from previous Professional and Technical Writing courses to
prepare for professional employment by performing advanced assignments guided by professional mentors and instructor.
PR: ENC 4946; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC
ENC 4311 Advanced Composition 3 AS ENG Instruction and practice in writing effective, lucid, and compelling prose, with special emphasis on style, logical argumentation, and critical thinking. PR: ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4906 Professional & Technical Writing Independent 3 LM ENG This course focuses on such individually chosen topics as communications crisis
management and PR strategy through written assignments, selected readings, and in-person or online meetings. Not restricted to majors; may be repeated for credit.
PR: Any two of the following: ENC 2210, ENC 3250, ENC 3310, ENC 4209, ENC 4212, ENC 4260, ENC 4264, ENC 4311; CI
ENC 4931 Selected Topics in Professional and Technical Writing 3 AS ENG Focus of the course will be determined by student demand and instructor interest. Topics to be covered may include legal writing, the conventions of business writing, writing in the medical fields, and writing for the social sciences. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. PR: ENC 3250, ENC 2210, or ENC 3310; CI
ENC 4946 Professional & Technical Writing Internship 3 LM ENG This course is a custom-designed internship for those students enrolled in the Professional and Technical Writing major.  Students work with a company or organization on real-world communications assignments under the guidance of a supervisor. PR: ENC 3242 with a grade of C or higher; Approved application and formal internship agreement; PTC majors only
ENG 3014 Introduction to Literary Methodology 3 AS ENG This course prepares English majors and minors with the basic critical and technical skills and understanding for subsequent literary study in 3000- and 4000-level courses towards the major. Substantial writing. Required of LIT majors. Recommended during first 2 semesters of LIT major. PR: ENC 1101, ENG 1102
ENG 4013 Literary Criticism 3 AS ENG A study of the works of major literary critics from Aristotle to the present, with emphasis on their meaning, their implied world view, and their significance for our own time and literature. Required for Literature majors. Recommended before 4000-level literature courses. None
ENG 4060 History of the English Language 3 AS ENG The evolution of language from Anglo-Saxon through Middle English to Modern
English. Development of the English lexicon. Changes in the pronunciation,
syntactic, and semantic systems; discussion of the forms which influenced them.
None
ENG 4906 Individual Research 1-4 AS ENG Directed study in special projects. None
ENG 4907 Directed Reading 3 AS ENG Readings in special topics. None
ENG 4934 Senior Literature Seminar 3 LM ENG The Senior Literature Seminar will be the capstone course for literature majors, emphasizing the degree-program outcomes. Students will develop and synthesize the knowledge and skills gained in the literature major, as they will explore a specific topic, which will vary. This is a required course for English majors. PR: ENG 3014; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC
ENG 4940 Internship in English 1-4 AS ENG Supervised field experience in a writing and/or reading oriented position relevant to the English major. Restricted to majors. Non-repeatable. English Majors only
ENL 3015 British Literature to 1616 3 AS ENG A survey of representative prose, poetry, and drama from its beginnings through the Renaissance, including such poems and figures as “Beowulf”, Chaucer, Malory, More, Hooker, Skelton, Wyatt, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, and Jonson. None
ENL 3016 Studies in 17th and 18th Century British Literature 3 AS ENG This is a topics course focusing on 17th and 18th century British literature. It satisfies a historical distribution requirement for the English major, LIT, and may be taken more than once for credit. None
ENL 3230 British Literature 1616-1780 3 AS ENG A survey of 17th Century and Neoclassical Literature, including such figures as Donne, Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, Marvell, Milton, Pope, Swift, Johnson, Boswell, and Goldsmith. None
ENL 3251 British Literature 1780-1900 3 AS ENG The poetry and poetics of the Romantic figures, with attention to the continuing importance of Romantic thinking in contemporary affairs and letters; a survey of representative figures of the Victorian and Edwardian periods, including poetry, prose, and drama. None
ENL 3273 British Literature 1900-1945 3 AS ENG Survey of poetry, drama, and fiction of such writers as Eliot, Yeats, Thomas, Conrad, Shaw, Joyce, Lawrence, Huxley, Woolf, Forster, Waugh, Owen, Auden, O’Casey, and others. None
ENL 3331 Early Shakespeare 3 AS ENG A study of from five to eight of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and early tragedies, ending with Hamlet. Special attention to developing the student’s ability to read and interpret the text. None
ENL 3332 Late Shakespeare 3 AS ENG A study of from five to eight of Shakespeare’s problem plays, major tragedies, and late romances. Special attention to developing the student’s ability to read and interpret the text. None
ENL 4122 19th Century British Novel 3 AS ENG Study of the 19th-century British novel, including works by novelists such as Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Trollope, and others. Analysis of the characteristics of the novels and their historical, social, cultural, and political contexts. None
ENL 4132 British Novel: Conrad to the Present 3 AS ENG A critical study of British fiction from 1900 to the present, with emphasis on such writers as Conrad, Lawrence, Joyce, Woolf, Huxley, Orwell, Burgess, Murdoch, Golding, and others. None
ENL 4303 Selected British Authors 3 AS ENG The study of two or three major figures in British Literature. The course may include such writers as Fielding and Austen, Keats and Yeats, Joyce and Woolf. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics. None
ENL 4311 Chaucer 3 AS ENG An intensive study of “The Canterbury Tales” and major critical concerns. None
ENL 4338 Advanced Studies in Shakespeare 3 AS ENG Intensive study of selected plays of Shakespeare, with special attention to significant critical issues and to the Elizabethan and Jacobean cultural setting. PR: ENL 3331 or ENL 3332; CI
ENL 4341 Milton 3 AS ENG Study of the poetry and major prose of John Milton, with special emphasis on “Paradise Lost.” None
ENL 4501 Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Literature 3 AS ENG This course will examine specific eras, genres, and authors within medieval and early modern literature. None
ENL 4930 Selected Topics 3 AS ENG This course examines a specific literary movement or genre in British literature (ie, Shakespearean genre, Romanticism). PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
ENL 4931 Studies in British Literature and Culture 3 AS ENG This course examines a particular topic or theme, varying with individual selection, in the British literary tradition. PR: ENC 1102
ESE 4322 Classroom Management for Diverse School & Society 3 ED ESE Focuses on classroom management in secondary schools including classroom climate, specific strategies to address management issues, school safety, violence, diversity, ethics, and educational law. None
ETG 4930 Special Topics in Information Technology 1-3 EN EIT Topics to be chosen by students and instructor permitting newly developing subdisciplinary special interests to be explored. None
ETG 4931 Special Topics in Technology I 1-3 EN ESB Special Topics in Technology. None
EUH 2011 Ancient History I 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH 2011 treats the ancient Near East, Egypt and Greece from the origins of civilization to the Hellenistic kingdoms following the death of Alexander the Great. None HP
EUH 2012 Ancient History II 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of ancient history. EUH 2012 deals with Rome through the Regal, Republican, and Imperial periods, from the beginnings of civilization in Italy to the division of the Roman Empire, A.D. 285. None SMSS, HP
EUH 2022 The Medieval West 3 AS HTY An introductory survey of medieval history. EUH 2022 examines the European and Mediterranean worlds, exploring the evolution and transformation of beliefs, institutions and social structures, ca. 500-1500. None HP
EUH 2030 Modern European History I 3 AS HTY A thematic survey of Europe in the modern age. EUH 2030 treats the period from
the Renaissance to the French Revolution.
None HP
EUH 2031 Modern European History II 3 AS HTY This course explores the social, political and economic forces which have shaped Europe over the past two hundred and fifty years. None HP
EUH 3142 Renaissance and Reformation 3 AS HTY A history of Europe from the Renaissance to the Thirty Years’ War (1400-1618). The cultural, social, and economic characteristics will provide the framework for artistic, philosophical, religious, and political developments. None
EUH 3181 Medieval Culture 3 AS HTY A survey of thought, culture, and art in the Middle Ages. Medieval attitudes as manifested in literature, art, philosophy, education, and religion; with emphasis upon Medieval man’s changing perception of himself and his world. None
EUH 3188 Medieval Society 3 AS HTY A study of the daily life and attitudes of the medieval nobleman, peasant, townsmen, and the agrarian-urban economy and society which affected their lives. None
EUH 3189 Medieval Politics 3 AS HTY An inquiry into the nature, distribution, and use of political power during the Middle Ages, in such institutions as feudalism, monarchy, cities, and the church. None
EUH 3202 History of 17th and 18th Century Europe 3 AS HTY A history of Europe from the beginning of the Thirty Years’ War to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Political and intellectual developments will be assessed in the light of society and the economy. None
EUH 3205 History of Nineteenth Century Europe 3 AS HTY A comparative study of economic, political, social, and intellectual developments in nineteenth century Europe. None
EUH 3401 Classical Greece 3 AS HTY A study of ancient Greece focusing on the brilliant period following the Persian Wars, but embracing as well the formative Bronze, Middle and Archaic ages, and the decline culminating in the conquest of Greece by Philip II of Macedon in 338 B.C. None
EUH 3402 Age of Alexander 3 AS HTY A study focusing on the career of Alexander the Great and on the Greek and Macedonian conquest of Imperial Persia. Also treated are the great hellenistic kingdoms prior to Rome’s conquest of the eastern Mediterranean. None
EUH 3412 Roman Republic 3 AS HTY A study of the Roman Republic from 509 B.C. to the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B. C., with a prelude treating Rome’s early development under royal rule. Political growth and change provide the framework for the treatment. None
EUH 3413 Roman Empire 3 AS HTY A study of Imperial Roman from the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C. to the death of the emperor Constantine in A.D. 337. Emphasized is Rome’s government of a vast Mediterranean empire including much of the near East and Europe. None
EUH 3501 British History to 1688 3 AS HTY A study of major developments in British history from the 15th century to 1688. None
EUS 3022 Russia 3 AS INT Area study courses are multi-disciplinary in nature and deal with one or more countries of a region. Each course combines some measure of political, economic, historical, religious, geographic, anthropological, and sociological analysis in dealing with salient features and current problems. None SS, AP
EVR 2001 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 AP ESP An introductory lecture course linking the human and physical/biological world. The course will develop an understanding of population and resource interactions. None SMNS, NS
EVR 2001L Environmental Science Lab 1 AS ESP A laboratory course linking the human and physical/biological world. The lab will develop an understanding of population and resource interactions and complement the lecture course. Field trips. None
EVR 2861 Introduction to Environmental Policy 3 AS ESP An introduction to environmental policy using class lectures, student projects, and independent readings. Emphasis will be placed on understanding basic policy mechanisms and major policy actions relating to environmental issues at the local, national and international level. None
EXP 4204C Perception 3 AS PSY Topics include sensory and physiological bases of perception and how people process relevant information in their environments. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4304 Motivation 3 AS PSY A survey of motivational processes and mechanisms from physiological and psychological viewpoints. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4404 Psychology of Learning 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations in conditioning and instrumental learning. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
EXP 4640 Psychology of Language 3 AS PSY Historical survey of relations between psychology and linguistics leading to the emergence of psycholinguistics as a field of study. The current status of theory and research in the field will be covered. PR: PSY 3213
EXP 4680C Cognitive Psychology 3 AS PSY Survey of methods, empirical findings, and theoretical interpretations of human learning, information processing, verbal learning, and judgment and decision-making. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better
FIL 1002 Introduction to Film Studies 3 AS HCS Students will be introduced to key concepts and techniques of Film Studies, including the history of film; an examination of film genres; an overview of foreign cinema; and the study of issues of class, race, gender, and sexuality. None SMHU, 6ACM
FIN 2100 Personal Finance 3 BA FIN Survey of the problems and techniques of personal financial planning. Includes consumer credit, insurance, home ownership, and personal investing, with attention given to current economic and legal constraints. Not available for credit to upper-level students who have been admitted to the College of Business. May not be counted toward major requirements in FIN or GBA.
FIN 3233 Money and Banking 3 BA FIN Examines the structure and operations of the U.S. monetary system, commercial banking, central banking, money, and capital markets, and provides an introduction to monetary theory and policy. PR: ECO 2013
FIN 3403 Principles of Finance 3 BA FIN Study of the processes, decision structures, and institutional arrangements concerned with the use and acquisition of funds by a firm. Includes the management of the asset and liability structure of the firm under certain and risky situations. The financial decision process will include and recognize the international as well as domestic aspects of financial management. PR: ACG 2071, ECO 2013, ECO 2023
FIN 3604 International Finance 3 BA FIN Study of factors affecting international business, assessment of risks, international managerial finance, institutions and instruments of international business finance. PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of C or better
FIN 4303 Financial Institutions and Markets 3 BA FIN A study of financial institutions and their roles in the capital markets; includes the savings allocation, investment, and financial decision making processes. PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of C or better
FIN 4414 Advanced Corporation Finance 3 BA FIN An examination of the financial policies of corporations, with special reference to dividend policy, financial structure, capital expenditures, acquisitions, mergers, and reorganizations. PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of C or better
FIN 4443 Financial Policies and Strategies 3 BA FIN A senior seminar for majors in Finance. Primarily a case course examining financial policies and the application of financial analysis to alternative strategies. PR: FIN 4414 or FIN 4504 with a grade of C- or better
FIN 4453 Finance Modeling and Analytics 3 BM FIN Students develop an understanding of the data and computer technology resources available for use in analyzing financial markets. Traditional financial models and theories are examined and evaluated via statistical and regression analysis. Non-majors ok. PR: FIN 3403
FIN 4461 Financial Statement Analysis 3 BA FIN Provides an understanding of the relationship between financial statements produced in accordance with GAAP and the informational content such statements provide. After completing the course, the student should have a better understanding of the usefulness of published financial statements to various users in a variety of circumstances. PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of C or better
FIN 4504 Principles of Investments 3 BA FIN Survey of the risks and returns of investment media in relation to the investment objectives of individual and institutional investors. Includes an examination of the capital markets, information flows, and analytical techniques in terms of their impact on the valuation process. PR: FIN 3403 with a grade of C or better
FIN 4514 Advanced Investment Analysis and Management 3 BA FIN A comprehensive study of security analysis and portfolio management. The course will utilize a quantitative approach to investment selection and management. PR: FIN 4504
FIN 4915 Independent Research 1-3 BA FIN The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson
FIN 4934 Selected Topics in Finance 1-3 BA FIN Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson on pertinent finance issues. None
FRE 1120 Beginning French I 4 AS WLE The first course in the study of elementary French. Emphasis on the development of basic skills in comprehension, speaking and reading. None
FRE 1121 Beginning French II 4 AS WLE A continuation of FRE 1120. PR: FRE 1120 or equivalent.
FRE 4392 African Images in Francophone Film 3 AS WLE This is a film based course and technologically enhanced course which will look at cultural, socio-economic, political and gender issues in French speaking Africa. Course materials will be available in English and French. None HP, AF, SS, AP
FRT 3140 French Literary Masterpieces in English Translation 3 AS WLE A survey of the major literary works of France, tracing not only literary but also intellectual and cultural history from the Middle Ages to the present. ENC 1101, ENC 1102 or their equivalent; Junior or Senior Standing LW
FSS 3231 Introduction to Food Production Management 3 HM HRM Food preparation, standards and techniques in commercial food production and service. Factors affecting the quality of food, practical experience in food production and service, in accordance with food standards, sanitation & safety and cost control. None
GEB 2011 Introduction to Business 3 BM An introductory course on business, is a class designed to help students develop a basic understanding of business principles, processes, practices, and strategies. The course will enable students to use business theories and concepts.  None SMSS
GEB 3016 Business Enterprise Management 3 BM EIT This course provides an overview of various business aspects of an enterprise, including Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Management, Production and IS, and how they are integrated and implemented through an Enterprise Resource Management System.  None
GEB 4890 Strategic Management and Decision Making 3 BA GBA This capstone course focuses on helping students develop a top-level executive perspective on managing a business, and requires students to integrate the theoretical and functional area concepts, principles, and skills learned in previous coursework. PR: FIN 3403, MAN 3025, MAR 3023; Senior Standing 6ACM, SMCC, MW
GEB 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BA GBA Specialized independent study determined by the student’s needs and interests. CI; S/U
GEB 4941 Internship 1-3 BP GBA The business internship class is designed to oversee and guide students internship experience. The course is a practical application in a clinical setting of knowledge acquired in the classroom. Junior Standing, DPR, S/U
GEO 3602 Urban Geography 3 AS GPY Spatial analysis of urban areas; growth, location, spacing, and size. Development, site, situation, internal structure, and hinterland are considered. PR: GEO 2400; CI
GEO 4340 Natural Hazards 3 AS GPY Examination of the physical, social, economic, political and cultural forces that create the phenomena of natural hazards. Case studies from around the world will include floods, droughts, tornadoes, hurricanes, freezes, heat waves, wild fires, earthquakes, tsunami, and volcanoes. Junior or Senior Standing
GEY 2000 Introduction to Aging Sciences 3 BC GEY This course is designed to be an introduction to the study of aging. The aging process is viewed from a multi-disciplinary perspective including the biological, psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. None SMSS, SS, AP
GEY 3323 Community Resources for the Older Adult 3 BC GEY This class is designed to introduce students to services available to older adults and to careers in the field of aging services. Content includes theoretical and practical issues, as well as exposure to opportunities for service and employment. None SMCD
GEY 3601 Physical Changes and Aging 3 BC GEY A survey of normal and pathological physical changes occurring from middle age through older age. Course emphasis will be on basic age-related changes and their implications for behavior in older age. None
GEY 3625 Sociological Aspects of Aging 3 BC GEY Consideration of human aging in a broad sociocultural context. Course emphasis will be on historical, philosophical, and demographic aspects of aging, theories of social gerontology, attitudes toward aging and the aged, and cross-cultural perspective. None SS, AF, AP
GEY 4322 Care Management for Older Adults 3 BC GEY This course examines the role and function of case management in meeting the needs of  older adults. All aspects of care management practice are covered, including the elements of the case management process as well as ethical and legal issues. None
GEY 4360 Counseling for Older Adults 3 BC GEY An introduction to the study of the major mental health problems of older adults. Current approaches to counseling older adults in community and institutional settings are discussed. None
GEY 4608 Alzheimer’s Disease Management 3 BC GEY This course will provide instruction on effective approaches for providing care to persons with Alzheimer’s Disease and related disorders in residential and home care settings. The major dementing disorders and typical behaviors presented by patients are presented along with strategies for successful behavior management. Building a dementia program and building dementia care teams are also covered. PR: GEY 2000 or GEY 3326; CI
GEY 4612 Psychology of Aging 3 BC GEY A comprehensive overview of psychological aspects of aging. Topics will include age-related changes in sensation/perception, cognition, and personality, as well as application to late-life psychopathology. None SS
GEY 4641 Death and Dying 3 BC GEY A broad overview of the basic concepts and psychosocial issues relating to the meaning of loss and death, the process of death, and the experience of grieving. Health care practices are considered along with community resources. None SS
GEY 4647 Ethical and Legal Issues of Aging 3 BC GEY A consideration of the major ethical and legal issues in aging and their implications for policies, priorities, and services. None SMLE, SS, MW
GEY 4692 Professional Development and Engagement in Aging 3 LM GEY The intent of the capstone course is threefold: (1) to enhance professional development in
gerontology; (2) pragmatically engage students in the field of practice; and (3) demonstrate mastery of core knowledge/skills gained in the gerontological courses.
PR: GEY 3601, GEY 3625, GEY 4612 6ACM, SMCC
GEY 4900 Directed Readings in Aging 1-3 BC GEY A reading program with topics in aging conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. CI
GEY 4917 Directed Research in Aging 1-4 BC GEY This course will provide undergraduate students with an opportunity to engage in an agreed upon research project under the supervision of a professor. The course is open to any major and is repeatable for credit. CI
GEY 4935 Special Topics in Gerontology 3 BC GEY Courses on topics such as preretirement, mental health, human services organization, nursing home administration, the older woman, and elder abuse will be offered. None
GIS 3006 Computer Cartography 3 AS GPY An introduction to the concepts underlying modern, computer-based mapping and to the collection and storage of digital spatial data. None
HFT 2930 Special Topics in Hospitality 3 HM HRM Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson for pertinent Hospitality Management issues. Focus is especially on introductory professional hospitality topics. None
HFT 3003 Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism 3 HM HRM An overview of the hospitality industry, including all of its related fields: restaurant; lodging; meetings, conventions and expositions. Also featured are the applications of the general marketing, human resources, leadership, and management. None
HFT 3263 Restaurant Management 3 HM HRM Management of food and beverages as they relate to planning, production, supervision and cost control in restaurants and catering food services, with emphasis on techniques of food preparation, menu merchandising, food safety, bar services and wine list. PR: HFT 3003, FSS 3231
HFT 3423 Hospitality Information Systems 3 HM HRM The study of management information systems in the hospitality management industry. The students will evaluate software and hardware computer systems and application software being used in the hospitality industry and develop selection strategies. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3424 Cost Control in Hospitality Operations 3 HM HRM The objective of this course is to learn basic cost control techniques and apply them to a foodservice industry. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3503 Hospitality Marketing and Sales 3 HM HRM Principles of marketing and sales and practical application in hospitality marketing philosophies; the marketing mix; product differentiation; market targeting and target communication. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 3603 Hospitality Industry Law & Leadership Ethics 3 HM HRM The course will integrate ethics and ethical decision making with law and legal doctrine in the hospitality industry. None SMLE
HFT 3700 Tourism Management 3 HM HRM Introductory course to the world of travel and tourism. Topics covered are cultural tourism, eco-tourism, sociology of tourism, tourism components and supply, tourism development, the economic role of tourism demand, and the marketing of tourism. None
HFT 3770 Cruise Line Operations and Management 3 HM HRM Overview of the cruise industry: its history and evolution, operating and marketing procedures, career opportunities, ship profiles, itineraries, and ports of call. None
HFT 3803C Restaurant Operations: Advanced Food & Beverage Management 3 HM HRM Operations of food & beverage establishments as they relate to production, supervision, & cost control in restaurants & catering food svcs, with emphasis on hands-on planning, real time creative thinking, post-event analysis & understanding of financials. FSS 3231 and HFT 3003 with a grade of “C” or better
HFT 3861 Beverage Management 3 HM HRM An introduction to the identification, use and service of wines, spirits, and other alcoholic beverages. An in-depth analysis of beverage operations to include selection/storage, inventory, purchasing, sales/promotion/merchandising, profits and bar management. None
HFT 3864 Introduction to Beer Science 3 HM HRM The Introduction to Beer Science is a series of investigations into the science underlying various aspects of beer, its brewing process, its pairings with food, and brew pub operations. None
HFT 3894 International Food & Culture 3 HM HRM This course explores cuisines with a focus on the geographic, historic, cultural, religious, and economic influences that shape food availability and consumption.  Students will examine how diversity shapes cultural food patterns. None SMCD
HFT 4221 Human Resources Management 3 HM HRM Designed to educate new managers and supervisors in the complex issues involved in a comprehensive human resource program and its importance to hotel and restaurant business. Workmen’s Compensation, ADA, training, unions, EEO and discrimination issues. PR: HFT 3003, MAN 3025
HFT 4243 Issues in Hospitality Management 3 HM HRM The objective of this course is to discuss how hospitality managers should deal with a variety of situation that include interactions with clients, coworkers and managers. None
HFT 4253 Lodging Management 3 HM HRM Principles, practices, procedures of managerial functions; operating procedures & competencies in the lodging industry.  Students gain knowledge on ownership, franchise, revenue mgmt., front office, housekeeping, & other major depts. in hotel properties. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4277 Club Management 3 HM HRM  This course surveys the operation and management of private city, country and athletic clubs. None
HFT 4295 Hospitality Leadership & Strategic Management 3 HM This course serves as the capstone course and upper level critical thinking/communication pillar course. Students use prior knowledge combined with new leadership & strategic management techniques to analyze a hospitality company. PR:  HFT 3503, HFT 4221 with grades of “C” or better 6ACM, SMCC
HFT 4323 Facilities Management in Hospitality Operations 3 HM HRM Engineering aspects of hospitality establishments, preventive maintenance procedures, energy conservation, waste management, pollution control, life safety systems, and facilities design and layout, air conditioning lighting, sound control. PR: HFT 3003
HFT 4468 Hospitality Revenue Management 3 HM HRM This course is a survey of revenue management related tactics, issues, and trends in the hospitality industry. The course will be taught as a seminar that will include: lectures, class discussions, online sessions and field work time. None
HFT 4471 Management Accounting and Finance in Hospitality 3 HM HRM The objective of this course is to learn management accounting and finance techniques applicable to the hospitality industry. PR: HFT 3003, ACG 2071,ACG 2021
HFT 4757 Event Management 3 HM HRM This course will concentrate on established standards, techniques, and practices of event management. The focus will be on social and business functions, and the management of large scale, independent events, such as catering events. None
HFT 4853 Restaurant Trends and Challenges Seminar 3 HM HRM Advanced level course focusing on contemporary management issues and challenges facing the foodservice and hospitality industries. Topic covered will be applicable to current trends applicable to a variety of situations. Senior Standing
HFT 4930 Special Topics in Hospitality 1-3 HM HRM Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson for pertinent Hospitality Management issues. None
HFT 4936 Hotel Management Seminar 3 HM HRM Advanced level course focusing on current problems and trends in hotel management and the hospitality industry. Senior Standing
HFT 4937 Hospitality Speaker Series 1 HM HRM Hospitality industry professionals deliver lectures on various topics related to the hospitality industry. Students prepare questions, engage in interactive discussions with each presenter, and complete detailed substantive reflections. Repeatable up to 3 times
HFT 4945 Hospitality Advanced Internship 3 HM HRM Coordinated hospitality training combines practical experience with didactic academic analysis. Principles, theory and standard practices applied to operational situations. S/U only. Senior Standing; S/U Students must complete 650 documented working hours in the hospitality industry before taking HFT 4945
HIS 3930 Special Topics 3 AS HTY This course is designed to emphasize a selected historical problem or issue that is meaningful and challenging to the student. A variety of instructional approaches will be taken to the material. Topics will be changed each semester. None
HIS 3938 Major Issues in History 3 AS HTY This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the historical relationship between (broadly) Asia and the West. It offers non-historians the opportunity to understand the dynamic between past and its interpretation. None MW
HIS 4104 Theory and Methods of History 3 AS HTY Introduces history majors to the theories, methods, approaches, and key debates that are central to the modern historical profession.  Develop skills in historical research, reading, writing, and oral communication.  Restricted to majors. History Majors Only; 2.25 History Major GPA required
HIS 4900 Directed Reading 1-4 AS HTY Arrangement with instructor prior to registration. Readings in special topics. CI
HIS 4936 Pro-Seminar in History 3 AS HTY Advanced topics in the various fields of history. Emphasis on discussion of assigned readings and on research and writing of a major paper. PR:  HIS 4104; History Majors Only with 2.25 Major GPA required 6ACM, SMCC, MW
HSC 3301 Health, Safety, Nutrition and Motor Skills for the Young Child 3 ED EDP Provide students with the knowledge to teach developmentally appropriate motor activities; to provide continuous health services; create and maintain a healthy learning environment; and sequence appropriate health instruction for Pre-K through 3rd grade students. None
HSC 3541 Human Structure and Function 3 PH CFH This course is designed to introduce the structural levels of the body beginning with chemicals and progressing through cells, tissues, organs and systems with emphasis on homeostasis, stress and feedback systems. Not restricted to majors. None NS
HUM 1020 Introduction to Humanities 3 AS HCS Analysis of selected works of literature, music, film, and visual art, representing artists of diverse periods, cultures, genders, and races. Especially recommended for students who later take 4000-level Humanities courses. None 6ACM, SMHU
HUM 4938 Major Issues in the Humanities 3 AS HCS The study of an important topical issue in the Humanities. Materials representing diverse views relating to that issue will be read, and works of art in different media that have relevance to the debate will be studied. Available to majors and non-majors. None MW
HUN 2201 Nutrition 3 NR NUR The study of fundamental principles of normal nutrition as they relate to human life and growth from conception through senescence, interpretation of current nutrition information, and application of nutrition knowledge in the establishment of good eating habits. None
IDH 2930 Selected Topics 0-3 HC HON This course is designed to emphasize a selected problem or issue that is meaningful and challenging to University Honors students and special populations. A variety of instructional approaches will be used. Topics will vary each semester. Repeatable for a total of 8 credits. PR: IDH 2010 SMEL
IDH 4000 Honors Program Seminar: Major Works/Major Issues 3 HC HON This course explores major works and major issues in a variety of disciplines. Each section will be devoted to content in a different academic area. PR: IDH 2010
IDH 4910 Undergraduate Research 0-3 HC HON A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. Open to all USF students by application through the undergraduate research coordinator. DPR
IDH 4950 Honors Project 1-4 HC HON A program of independent research or study in areas of specific interest working under the supervision of a faculty mentor. Restricted to Honors College students. None
IDH 4970 Honors Thesis 3 HC HON The development and public presentation of a senior thesis under the direction of a mentor. Course is taken for 2 semesters. Senior Honors Standing
IDS 3947 Cooperative Internship 0-6 US DEA Learning objectives determined by faculty and aligned with experiences in the workplace setting related to student’s career aspiration and/or academic program. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 credit hours. The internship course is open to all majors. None
INP 2101 Applied Psychology 3 AS PSY The application of psychological principles and the functions of psychologists in education, government, industry, and clinical practice None
INP 4004 Industrial Psychology 3 AS PSY Applications of psychological principles to industry. Topics include: selection, training, motivation, job satisfaction, supervision, decision-making. PR: PSY 3213 with a grade of “C” or better SMLE
INR 1015 World Perspective 3 AS PSY An interdisciplinary study of the international system, major world regions and
problems.
None SMSS, SS, AF
INR 2002 Introduction to International Relations 3 AS POL Concepts and analytical tools applied to events such as politics among nations, control of foreign policies, types of actors, war and peace. None
INR 3011 Globalization 3 AS INT Influence of globalization on political-economic and social systems around the world. International organizations involved with globalization processes are studied along with nations benefiting and suffering from the consequences of globalization. None
INR 3018 World Ideologies 3 AS INT A course which details and examines the ideologies of today’s independent countries; analyzing them in their political, social, cultural and historical context. None MW
INR 3033 International Political Cultures 3 AS INT This course will explore ways in which culture influences the nature of government, economic success or failure, and constructive and destructive modes of self and social identification. None MW
INR 3038 International Wealth and Power 3 AS INT Introduction to the relationship between politics and economics, emphasizing the analysis of government policies in response to both domestic and international economic problems. None SMLE
INR 3102 American Foreign Policy 3 AS POL Analysis of the development and scope of United States foreign policy, emphasizing goals and objectives, policy formulation and implementation, themes and issues. None
INR 3202 International Human Rights 3 AS INT This courses explores the evolution of international rights from the Greeks to the present. It examines human rights issues in major regions of the world. None MW, SMLE
INR 3336 Intelligence and U.S. Foreign Policy 3 AS INT An examination of the role of intelligence and the intelligence community in U.S. foreign policy, with emphasis on the period since World War II. None
INR 4035 International Political Economy 3 AS POL Analysis of the development and politics of the international economic system, focusing on questions of cooperation and conflict in trade, aid, and investment relationships. None
INR 4083 Conflict In The World 3 AS INT An interdisciplinary course examining theories of conflict, conflict resolution processes and strategies, theories and peacemaking strategies, and the concept of Early Warning Systems related to the outburst of conflict. Junior or Senior Standing MW; SMLE
INR 4403 International Law 3 AS POL Examines essential components of the international legal system; recognition; succession; sea, air and space law, treaties, diplomats, International Court of Justice; laws of war, etc. Introduces the student to legal reasoning as employed in the international context. None
INR 4900 Directed Readings 1-3 AS INT A supervised program of intensive reading of interdisciplinary materials in areas of specific interest. CI
INR 4910 Directed Research 1-3 AS INT A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. CI
INR 4931 Selected Topics 1-3 AS INT Interdisciplinary studies with course content dependent on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
ISM 3011 Information Systems in Organizations 3 BA QMB An introduction to the language, concepts, structures and processes involved in the management of information systems including fundamentals of computer-based technology and the use of business-based software for support of managerial decisions. PR: CGS 2100 or equivalent
ISM 3113 Systems Analysis and Design 3 BA QMB The course presents concepts, procedures, and tools needed to build computer-based information systems. The objective is to develop project management, data collection, analysis, design, testing and documentation skills. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; CP: ISM 3232 with a grade of C or better. ISM 3232 can be taken concurrently with ISM 3113.
ISM 3115 Business Informatics 3 BM QMB Business informatics is concerned with the use of information technology to
solve business problems. The course will present the methods and technical tools
required to design systems to support managerial decision making.
PR: ISM 3011
ISM 3232 Business Application Development 3 BA QMB Presentation of business application development using an object-oriented programming language. Good program design techniques are emphasized. Business applications are developed. CP: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 3431 Operations and Supply Chain Processes 3 BA QMB This course will provide a contemporary overview of operations management with special emphasis on supply chains and services. Both concepts for successful managers and common tools used to build, manage, and improve systems will be covered. PR: QMB 2100 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 or ACG 2071 with a grade of “C-” or better
ISM 4212 Database Design and Administration 3 BA QMB An introduction to the concepts and principles of database management. Provides potential designers, users and managers of database systems with an understanding of physical vs. logical representations, data modeling, implementation, and data management. PR: ISM 3113 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4220 Business Data Communications 3 BA QMB Fundamentals of data communication, including network architectures, communication protocols, transmission standards, and internetworking. Basic concepts in distributed computing will also be covered. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4233 Information System Interface Design 3 BA QMB An introduction to theories of human-computer interaction and the principles and practices of information system interface design, evaluation, and integration. Students develop programs utilizing various user interface design techniques. PR: ISM 3232 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4234 Object-Oriented Design and Development 3 BA QMB This course presents an object-oriented approach to software development of business information systems. Students will learn to create object models of the business world and to develop information system designs based on these objects. PR: ISM 3232 with a grade of “B” or better
ISM 4300 Managing Information Resources 3 BA QMB Current issues in information systems management focusing on managing computer resources and social issues such as ethics, privacy, and legal issues including intellectual property. PR: ISM 4212 with grade of “C” or better, not C- and  ISM 4220 or ISM 4402 with a grade of C or better, not C-
ISM 4382 Global Information Systems 3 BA QMB Role of information technology in global business organizations and challenges in building information systems to enable global operations. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4400 Decision Support Systems 3 BA QMB Study of quantitative analysis tools and their use in organizational decision making. Emphasis on a structured approach to making common business decisions, demonstrating several forms of mathematical modeling and other management science techniques. PR: QMB 3200 with grade of “C-” or better and ISM 3113 or ISM 3011 with a grad of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4480 Electronic Commerce Systems 3 BA QMB Familiarize students with the opportunities and challenges associated with e-commerce and its business models, to explore the underlying technologies used in implementing e-commerce systems, and to develop the skills needed to manage effective Web sites. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-; MIS Majors Only
ISM 4545 Big Data Processing with R 3 BM EIT This course covers how to process Big Data using an open-source computing platform called R. Fundamental, intermediate and advanced concepts of R are covered.  The course also covers some other computing tools that are currently popular, e.g. SAS, Python. PR:  STA 2122
ISM 4930 Selected Topics in MIS 1-3 BA QMB Selected topics in MIS. PR: ISM 3011 with a grade of “C” or better, not C-
ISM 4950 Independent Research 1-6 BA QMB Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
ISS 3010 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 AS ISS Integrates the range of social science fields into a global interdisciplinary perspective. Views social institutions and issues from perspectives of changing paradigms. None
ISS 3300 Research Methods in Social Sciences 3 LM ISS This course introduces students to the methodologies used in social science research. It covers both qualitative and quantitative research design, sampling, measurement, analysis, and critical evaluation of scholarly literature. PR: ISS 3010 with a grade of “C” or better; CP: ISS 3311 with a grade of “C” or better
ISS 3311 Applied Statistics for the Social Sciences 3 LM ISS This course builds on a basic knowledge of descriptive and inferential statistics and demonstrates the application of statistics in the social scientific research. Students test hypotheses using statistical software and interpret statistical output. PR: STA 2023
ISS 3930 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 1-3 AS ISS Interdisciplinary studies of varying topics, with course content dependent on student demand and instructor’s interest. None
ISS 3931 Selected Topics in the Social Sciences 3 LM ISS Interdisciplinary studies of varying topics, with course content dependent on
student demand and instructor’s interest. The course builds on the knowledge
attained from the Research Methods in Social Sciences course.
PR: ISS 3300
ISS 3937 Interdisciplinary Inquiry 3 LM ISS An in-depth interdisciplinary analysis of students ISS concentration areas combined with a 100 hour internship experience.  Students will integrate social scientific research and insights in the completion of an internship project. PR: ISS 3300
ISS 4910 Directed Research 1-3 AS ISS A supervised program of interdisciplinary research in areas of specific interest. CI
ISS 4935 Seminar in the Social Sciences 3 AS ISS The seminar which caps the interdisciplinary major. Weds personal curiosity with the application of theoretical models to research on salient social issues. PR: ISS 3010; CI; Senior Standing MW
ISS 4939 Senior Capstone Seminar in ISS 3 LM ISS This course facilitates the completion of an interdisciplinary capstone project that showcases the skills students have acquired throughout their course of study in the major. A selected topic is used to illustrate the interdisciplinary research process. PR: ISS 3937 6ACM, SMCC
ISS 4940 Internship in Interdisciplinary Social Sciences 1-4 AP ISS Individual guidance in a selected internship. Restricted to majors. Non-repeatable. ISS Majors Only
LAE 4314 Teaching Writing in the Elementary School, Grades K-6 3 ED EDE The purpose of this course is for students to understand children’s writing development and to design and implement instructional strategies for teaching composition in an integrated Language Arts curriculum. Elementary Education Majors Only; CI
LAH 2020 Latin American Civilization 3 AS HTY This course introduces the principle historical events, trends, conflicts and outcomes that have shaped the Spanish and Portuguese Americas from the Pre-Columbian period (prior to 1492) to the present. None SMEL
LAS 3116 Latin America Through Film 3 AS INT This course will use film, video, selected readings, and lectures to teach the interested student about Latin America. None
LDR 3003 Introduction to Leadership Studies 3 LM LDR This course focus is understanding self and personal leadership. It covers a
broad range of leadership topics from understanding self, group behavior,
teamwork, organizational design, ethics, and change
None
LDR 3263 Community Leadership Practicum 3 US LDR This course involves the transference of leadership theories into practice. It provides a practical forum for students to examine and develop personal leadership skills. PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- 6ACM, SMCC; USFSM considers LDR 3003 as equivalent to LDR 2010; See Advisor
LDR 3331 Leading in the Workplace 3 US LDR Explores the complex challenges of leadership through the examination of leaders and workforce situations. Designed to view leadership as a process focusing on the leader, the followers, and real-world workplace situations. Appropriate for working adults. Junior Standing
LDR 3930 Selected Topics in Student Leadership 0-3 US LDR Course content will depend upon the interest of the faculty member and student demand. Repeatable up to 15 credits. None
LDR 4104 Theories of Leadership 3 US LDR Focuses on historical and modern views of leadership. It is designed to assist students analyzing and understanding the historical, social, political aspects of leadership theories and styles as well as the application of leadership theories in settings. PR: LDR 2010 or LDR 3331 with a minimum grade of C- For USFSM students LDR 3003 can serve as equivalent to LDR 2010; See Advisor
LDR 4114 Survey of Leadership Readings 3 US LDR Survey of historical and contemporary writings on leadership skills and practices. Examines the contextual manner in which the leader functions. None
LDR 4204 Ethics and Power in Leadership 3 US LDR Course reviews arguments for ethics in leadership as proposed by both contemporary and ancient leadership theories. It also examines theories of power and authority, and seeks answers to the apparent dilemmas through applied moral theory and psychology. None SMLE
LIN 3801 Language and Meaning 3 AS WLE A survey introduction for non-specialists to the basic principles of semantics and the way language conveys ideas. This course is also available on WUSF/TV Channel 16 by the O.U. Program. None
LIN 4671 Traditional English Grammar 3 AS ENG A course primarily using the sentence diagram to present a detailed analysis of the parts of speech, verb tenses, sentence functions, and other basic grammatical classifications of traditional English grammar. None
LIN 4680 Structure of American English 3 AS ENG An introductory survey of traditional, structural, and generative transformational grammars and their techniques for the analysis and description of linguistic structure in general, and contemporary American English, in particular. None
LIT 2000 Introduction to Literature 3 AS ENG This course will introduce students to the three major literary forms of prose, poetry and drama as well as to various “schools” of literary criticism. Will not count toward the English major. None 6ACM, SMHU
LIT 2010 Introduction to Fiction 3 AS ENG A study of the short story and novel as literary forms; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any historical period. Will not count toward the English major. None HP
LIT 2030 Introduction to Poetry 3 AS ENG A study of the poem as literary form; approached from an historical perspective though not restricted to any historical period. Will not count toward the English major. None SMHU, 6ACM, HP
LIT 2040 Introduction to Drama 3 AS ENG This course will introduce students to the literary form of drama as well as to the various “schools” of literary criticism. Will not count toward the English major. None HP
LIT 3022 Modern Short Prose 3 AS ENG This course for English majors and minors explores modern short prose in World, British, and American literatures; genres include the short story, the long short story, the short novel, and the essay. Not repeatable. PR: ENC 1101, ENC 1102
LIT 3031 Survey of Poetry 3 AS ENG A chronological sampling of the major poems written in English from the Middle Ages to the present. Recommended as the first literature course in the CRW (Poetry emphasis) Option. None SMCD
LIT 3043 Modern Drama 3 AS ENG A study of such modern and contemporary dramatists as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Shaw, O’Neill, Pinter, Stoppard, Brecht, Beckett, and Ionesco. None SMCD
LIT 3093 Contemporary Literature 3 AS ENG An introduction to the fiction, poetry, and drama written since 1945–American, British, Continental, or Multicultural. Focus may be on one, two, or all three genres or on works from any combination of nationalities. None SMCD
LIT 3101 Literature of the Western World Through the Renaissance 3 AS ENG A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from its beginnings through the Renaissance, including the Bible, Homer, Sophocles, Plato, Euripides, Virgil, Cicero, Dante, Petrarch, Machiavelli, and Rabelais, among others. None
LIT 3102 Literature of the Western World Since the Renaissance 3 AS ENG A study in English of the great works of Western Literature from the Neoclassic to the Modern Period, including such writers as Moliere, Racine, Voltaire, Dostoevsky, Chekhov, Ibsen, Kafka, Gide, Sartre, and Camus, among others. None
LIT 3103 Great Literature of the World 3 AS ENG A survey of world literature including samples from the ancient and modern era, Western and Eastern traditions, male and female writers, and various ethnic cultures. Focus on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None MW, LW
LIT 3144 Modern European Novel 3 AS ENG A study of the Modern European novel in translation as it developed from the nineteenth century to the present, including such writers as Dostoevsky, Flaubert, Kafka, Hesse, Camus, and Solzhenitsyn. None HP
LIT 3301 Cultural Studies and the Popular Arts 3 AS ENG A study of American and international cultures as they are represented in the film, fiction, and other cultural artifacts of various ethnic groups and nationalities. Focuses on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None MW, LW
LIT 3353 Literature, Race, and Ethnicity 3 AS ENG Course examines the intersections of race, ethnicity & literature. Focusing on one or multiple groups, provides a conceptual grounding in how written identities are formed from within marginalized communities & how groups use writing to define themselves. PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
LIT 3374 The Bible As Literature 3 AS ENG Major emphasis on literary types, literary personalities of the Old (Fall semester) and New (Spring semester) Testaments, and Biblical archetypes of British and American literary classics. Focuses on values/ethics, race, ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. May be taken twice for credit with different subject matter. May count once toward the major. None MW
LIT 3383 The Image of Women in Literature 3 AS ENG This course seeks to trace the origins of contemporary views about women, to analyze major Eastern and Western literary portrayals of women, to examine ideas about women’s roles, and to compare and contrast cultural and racial images of women. Will not count toward the English major. None MW, LW
LIT 3410 Religious and Philosophical Themes 3 AS ENG Theological and philosophical ideas, allusions, and symbols in the writings of Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Mann, Joyce, Eliot, Camus, Sartre, among others. None
LIT 3451 Literature and the Occult 3 AS ENG An introduction to the occult tradition as a major ingredient in English, Continental, American, and Multicultural literature. Focuses on values/ethics, race/ethnicity and gender; thinking and writing skills. Will not count toward the English major. None MW, LW
LIT 3513 Literature, Gender, and Sexuality 3 AS ENG Surveys literature from the perspective of gender & sexuality; studying a variety of genres/forms, familiar as well as lesser-known figures; analyze texts aesthetically & rhetorically within various historical, cultural, & theoretical contexts. PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
LIT 3621 Literature of Climate Change: Climate Fiction 3 LM ENG A study of literature about climate change in the new genre of Climate Fiction, including works by Margaret Atwood, T.C. Boyle, Kim Stanley Robinson and the like. None SMLE
LIT 3930 Special Topics in English Studies 3 AS ENG The study of variable specialized areas of literary interest, suitable for
junior and senior English majors. Topics will vary according to student interest
and instructor expertise. May be taken twice for credit with different topics.
None
LIT 3043 Modern Drama 3 AS ENG A study of such modern and contemporary dramatists as Ibsen, Strindberg, Chekhov, Pirandello, Shaw, O’Neill, Pinter, Stoppard, Brecht, Beckett, and Ionesco. None SMCD
LIT 4386 British and American Literature by Women 3 AS ENG Survey of women’s literary tradition in England and America from the seventeenth century to the present. Thematic focus includes self, marriage, sexuality, madness, race and generations. Writing intensive. None
LIT 4930 Selected Topics in English Studies 1-3 AS ENG The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. It will examine in depth a recurring literary theme or the work of a small group of writers. Special courses in writing may also be offered under this title. May be taken twice for credit with different topics None
LIT 4931 Studies in World Literature and Culture 3 AS ENG Course examines how social, political, cultural, economic, and intellectual issues intersect with one particular theme or issue from a global perspective; requires intense reading, a grasp of current literary scholarship, and rigorous written exercises. PR: ENC 1102 with a grade of C- or better
MAC 1105 College Algebra 3 AS MTH Concepts of the real number system, functions, graphs, and complex numbers. Analytic skills for solving linear, quadratic, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic equations. Mathematical modeling of real life applications. College Algebra may be taken either for General Education credit or as preparation for a pre-calculus course. PR:  MAT 1033 with a “C” or better, or SAT Math Score of 490 or better; or ACT Math Score of 21 or better; or Elementary Algebra CPT score of 90 or better, or College-Level Math CPT score of 40 or better; No credit for students with prior credit for MAC 1140 or MAC 1147 6AMM, SMMA, QM
MAC 1140 Precalculus Algebra 3 AS MTH Review of functions and graphs. Analytic geometry including conic sections and rotation of axes, systems of equations including matrix algebra and determinants, sequences and series including Binomial Theorem. PR: MAC 1105 with a “C” or better, or SAT Math Score of 550 or better, or ACT Math Score of 24 or better; CP: MAC 1114
MAC 1147 Precalculus Algebra and Trigonometry 4 AS MTH This is an accelerated combination of MAC 1140 and MAC 1114; this course is best for students who have already seen some trigonometry. See the descriptions of MAC 1140 and MAC 1114. PR: MAC 1105 with a grade of “C” or better, SAT Math Score with a score of 550 or better, ACT Math Score with a score of 24 or better, College-Level Math CPT with a score of 60 or better; No credit for students with credit for either MAC 1140 or MAC 1114 6AMM, SMMA, QM
MAC 2233 Business Calculus 3 AS MTH Linear equations and functions, mathematics of finance, differentiation and integration of algebraic, exponential and logarithmic functions with applications to business, finance and economics. PR: MAC 1105 or MAC 1140 or MAC 1147 with a grade of “C” or better, SAT Math score of 590 or better, ACT Math score of 26 or better, College-Level Math  CPT score of 78 or better; No credit for Mathematics majors 6AMM, SMMA, QM
MAC 2241 Life Sciences Calculus I 3 AS MTH No credit for math majors. Differentiation and integration of algebraic, trigonometric, exponential, and logarithmic functions with applications to life
sciences.
PR:  MAC 1114 or MAC 1147 with a grade of “C” or better, or SAT Math score of 650 or better, or ACT Math score of 29 or better, or College-Level Math CPT score of 90 or better; knowledge of Trigonometry 6AMM, SMMA
MAC 2311 Calculus I 4 AS MTH Differentiation, limits, differentials, extremes, indefinite integral. PR: MAC 1114 or MAC 1140 or MAC 1147 with a grade of “C” or better, or SAT Math score of 650 or better, or ACT Math score of 29 or better, or College-Level Math CPT score of 90 or better; knowledge of Trigonometry QM
MAC 2312 Calculus II 4 AS MTH Antiderivatives, the definite integral, applications, series, log, exponential and trig functions. PR: MAC 2311 with a grade of “C” or better
MAC 2313 Calculus III 4 AS MTH Integration, polar coordinates, conic sections, vectors, indeterminate forms and proper integrals. PR: MAC 2312 with a grade of “C” or better 6AMM
MAD 2104 Discrete Mathematics 3 BM EIT This course covers set theory, logic, proofs, counting techniques, and graph
theory.
None SMEL
MAE 4310 Teaching Elementary School (K – 6) Mathematics I 3 ED EDE Methods for teaching number ideas, computation skills, and mathematical reasoning in elementary (K – 6) classrooms. PR: two college level mathematics courses; School of Education Majors Only
MAE 4326 Teaching Elementary School (K – 6) Mathematics II 3 ED EDE Methods for teaching informal geometry, measurement, probability , statistics, and algebraic thinking for elementary school (K – 6) classrooms. PR: MAE 4310
MAN 3025 Principles of Management 3 BA MAN Examines intrapersonal, interpersonal, group/team, organizational, and environmental (both stakeholder and societal) factors influencing the management task. None SMLE
MAN 3240 Organizational Behavior Analysis 3 BA MAN The course covers research literature relevant to organizational functioning including behavioral effects of power and authority, formal organization, structural variation, leadership, motivation, and communication. PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 3301 Human Resource Management 3 BA MAN To develop a broad exposure to new approaches, techniques, and future trends in the management of personnel. A study of the major functions in personnel including job analysis, manpower planning, selection, performance evaluation, training, and wage and salary administration. PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4282 Organizational Assessment 3 BA MAN The analysis and measurement of factors which influence organizational effectiveness and the quality of work life. Data based cases will be used by students to assess managerial and supervisory skills and to measure organizational functioning and work design. PR: MAN 3240
MAN 4402 Employment Laws 3 BA MAN This course covers Federal and state laws and regulations such as wage and hour laws; EEO; affirmative action programs; employee benefits; insurance; workers’ compensation, safety, health, employee’s personal rights and collective bargaining. PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4430 Seminar in Negotiations and Administration of Labor Agreements 3 BA MAN Case studies in contract negotiation, administration, grievance settlement, and arbitration. Assumes familiarity with industrial relations system. PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better
MAN 4504 Operations Management: A Systems Approach 3 BA QMB Studies the problems of “operations” in all types of enterprises in both the public and private sectors. Emphasis is placed on the application of various decision science methodologies to problem situations. PR: QMB 2100 or STA 2023 or STA 2122 with a grade of “C-” or better
MAN 4600 International Management 3 BA MAN Examines the effects of international cultural differences on business practices within and outside the United States and provides methods to build synergies and establish/enhance competitive advantage via those differences. PR: MAN 3025 with a grade of “C” or better; CI; Senior Standing
MAN 4802 Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management 3 BA MAN Study of the factors involved in starting and managing a small- to medium-sized business. Emphasis on conduct of pre-business feasibility study, start-up of business, successful management of the firm, and options for succession or termination. PR: ACG 2021, ACG 2071, MAR 3023; CI
MAN 4804 Small Business Management Counseling 3 BA MAN Field application in small business settings by (a) analyzing an on-going small business and developing recommendations for making improvements; or (b) conducting a feasibility study for a new enterprise and developing a strategy for implementation if favorable. PR: MAN 4802; CI
MAN 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BA MAN Specialized independent study determined by the students needs and interests. CI; S/U
MAN 4930 Selected Topics in Management 1-3 BA MAN Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson for pertinent Management issues. None
MAN 4931 Independent Research 1-4 BA MAN Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 AS MTH First order linear and nonlinear differential equations, higher order linear equations, applications. PR: MAC 2283 or MAC 2313
MAR 3023 Basic Marketing 3 BA MKT Survey of the marketing of goods and services within the economy. Attention is paid to the impact of marketing on other functional areas of business as well as society. Junior Standing
MAR 3400 Professional Selling 3 BA MKT A study of the stages of the professional selling process, and the role of sales in today’s marketing environment. Emphasis on learning adaptive selling techniques and developing effective interpersonal communications skills. Sales careers are examined. PR: MAR 3023; CI
MAR 3613 Marketing Research 3 BA MKT A study of research methods and techniques applicable to problem solving in marketing. Attention is also given to defining information needs, determining the value of information, interpreting and reporting information for use in marketing decision making. PR: QMB 2100 or QMB 2150 or STA 2014, or STA 2023 with a grade of “C-” or better and MAR 3023 with a grade of “C” or better
MAR 3823 Marketing Management 3 BA MKT An applications oriented study of the marketing function at an intermediate level. Emphasis upon techniques for analysis and problem-solving. Builds upon the principles and concepts learned in MAR 3023, and provides a strong foundation for the remaining courses in the marketing curriculum. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4156 International Marketing 3 BA MKT A study of procedures and problems associated with establishing marketing operations in foreign countries. Includes the institutions, principles and methods involved in the solution of these business problems as well as the effects of national differences on business practices and buyer behavior. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4333 Promotion Management 3 BA MKT A study of the role of promotion in the marketing program of the firm, including the promotional tools available to the marketing manager and the various types of decisions made in the promotional area. Decision making process in development of a promotional program is emphasized. PR: MAR 3023; CI
MAR 4503 Buyer Behavior 3 BA MKT A study of the basic concepts of buyer behavior, including pre- and post-purchase attitudes and behavior patterns, information processing relating to the functional areas of marketing and the buyer’s decision-making process. Managerial applications to marketing are emphasized. PR: MAR 3023
MAR 4824 Marketing Management Problems 3 BA MKT The integration of marketing knowledge applied to decision roles in managing the total marketing effort of firms, and coordination with other major functional areas on specific problems. Restricted to Marketing majors. PR: MAR 3823 and MAR 3613 with a grade of “C-” or better; Senior Standing
MAR 4841 Services Marketing 3 BM FIN The course focuses on challenges of designing, promoting, and managing services while delivering quality service to customers across industry sectors. PR: MAR 3023 with a grade of “C” or better
MAR 4903 Independent Research 1-3 BA MKT Individual study contract with instructor and department chairperson required. The research project will be mutually determined by the student and instructor. CI
MAR 4905 Independent Study 1-3 BA MKT Specialized independent study determined by the students’ needs and interests. CI; S/U
MAR 4933 Selected Topics In Marketing 1-3 BA MKT Topics to be selected by instructor and department chairperson. PR: MAR 3023 with a grade of “C” or better
MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra 3 ED EDO This course provides students with an opportunity to develop algebraic knowledge needed for further study in several fields such as engineering, business, science, computer technology, and mathematics. PR: MAT 0024 with a grade of “C” or better or appropriate score on the Scholastic Aptitude Test, Mathematics (SATM)
MAT 4906 Independent Study 1-4 AS MTH Specialized independent study determined by the student’s needs and interests. The written contract required by the College of Arts and Sciences specifies the regulations governing independent study. CI; S/U Note: this course requires that the student will use statistical software and programming packages to analyze data and determine statistical problems.
MCB 3020 General Microbiology 3 AS BCM Structure and function of bacteria, archaea, viruses, and eukaryotic microbes. PR: BSC 2010, BSC 2010L, BSC 2011, BSC 2011L, CHM 2210, MAC 1105 or higher-level MAC course or STA 2023; CP: PCB 3023 or PCB 3043 or PCB 3063 or PCB 3712
MCB 3020L General Microbiology Laboratory 1 AS BCM The laboratory involves preparation of culture media, staining, pure culture methodology, isolation of microbes from nature, enumeration tec